alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial yet another reason not to imbibe
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
October 19, 2017, 10:15:14 AM *
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Author Topic: yet another reason not to imbibe  (Read 6836 times)
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« Reply #120 on: October 12, 2017, 01:24:22 AM »

Centrifugal brake number two, this time with a clutch.  Started with:

















As mentioned above, I screwed up drilling a hole on the narrowed stand and had to replace the post.





The flange was threaded onto the arbor and a nut was put behind the flange  to lock it in place.

























Several stop latches have been tried but all were too fiddly or in the way.  This works good enough for now.



Works OK.  That black stuff on my fingers is dye rubbing off the cheap Chinese dyneema.  You can't find good 6 thread silk or linen line now.  Wish I could make my own.



-steve
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 02:11:33 AM by oc1 » Logged
mo65
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« Reply #121 on: October 12, 2017, 04:34:23 AM »

   That is one trick little Shakespeare indeed...great work Steve. I hear ya about the cheap line...the red is even worse than the black. Cool
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« Reply #122 on: October 12, 2017, 05:16:30 AM »

    Great !  I love your "additions".....and how you make them work !
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« Reply #123 on: October 12, 2017, 05:38:40 AM »

Steve, I really enjoy seeing you catch fish with your customized antiques.  This thread has taken on a life of its own. 
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« Reply #124 on: October 12, 2017, 12:23:27 PM »

Steve, Very clever and a great result!
Basto
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« Reply #125 on: October 13, 2017, 11:47:48 PM »

Here is a really quick and easy centrifugal break hack for a Horton/Meek Blue Grass 33 tube reel.  It is completely reversible.  Something similar can probably be done with other tube reels like Horton Simplex, Meisselbach Tripart and Takeapart.  This example has had a rough life but they are very sturdy reels and hold their alignment very well.  I've never seen one that did not have good bushings and journals.  They came without a friction break or spool tension knob so it is all thumb until you add the centrifugal brake.













The inside of the screw-off tail plate serves as the race so shine it up some.



You have to remove the clicker, but they were nice enough not rivet the button to the dog so it can be put back later if you want.  The clicker ratchet looks like a pinion and is chewed up on this example.



Cut a little cylinder of brass tubing, solder some wires to it, slide it over the clicker ratchet, lock it in place with a pin.  The pin is just another piece of #15 leader wire that is wedged between the ratchet teeth and the brass cylinder.  You can barely see it in the last photo.  Tune the bamboo brake shoe size to your needs and it's done.







-steve
« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 12:15:11 AM by oc1 » Logged
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« Reply #126 on: October 14, 2017, 06:46:08 AM »

Excellent work, as usual! I have come to look forward to additions to this thread and open first when I find something new has arrived.... 

Not that there is anything wrong with bamboo, but have you tried any other materials to see if you find a noticeable difference?

Sid
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Sid Lehr
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« Reply #127 on: October 14, 2017, 06:56:02 AM »

   Looking forward to the "fishing report" on this one !   Good job !
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« Reply #128 on: October 14, 2017, 12:21:12 PM »

Haven't really tried anything else Sid.  Except, the other day I was fishing and it started feeling like I did not have enough brake.  I think the reel bushings were breaking in and getting faster.  I pulled a little plastic bead off the jig I was using and put it under the bamboo.  That worked.  I once opened an old Shimano Bantam 100 and found someone had been using a small section of electrical cord insulation for a brake block.  I don't know what the early ABU blocks were but they had the feel of phenolic resin. 

I have been trying to figure out when this style of centrifugal brake first appeared.  It may have been in the ABU 5000 beginning in the late 1950's.  Certainly, that is where it became famous.  Patent protection gave the 5000 a solid hold on the baitcasting market for a long time but I cannot find the patent description.

The earliest patent I've found for a centrifugal fishing reel brake was to Edward Gilmore in 1907.  It had an adjustable brake shoe attached to the spool flange.  Apparently, it never caught on.

-steve
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« Reply #129 on: October 14, 2017, 01:47:32 PM »

What an impressive setup.  l'd love to see the looks given by the hillbilly fishermen down at Kingston Steam Plant if they saw that rig in operation.  Shocked
There is something I didn't mention because it is so embarrassing.  But they say catharsis is good for the soul.

With a long limber rod and 3/8 or 1/4 ounce jig the reel is uncontrollable.  If the jeweled spool tension knobs are cranked down enough to get somewhat thumb-free casting it yields no distance.  If the spool tension knobs are backed off and my thumb is perfectly aligned with the cosmos it will throw 3/8 ounce at least 39 yards.  The trouble is, my thumb and the cosmos almost never line up so 95% of the time it either falls way short or ends in a backlash.

The original goal of having a Depression Era period appropriate rig went out the window when the spool was drilled.  So, I magged it to get the spool under control.  I had never magged a reel before and bought the wrong magnets.  They are a whopping half-inch in diameter and the neodymium number is probably low.  Drilling the spool may make the magnets less effective.  The steel clicker ratchet centered between the magnets may make them less effective.  For whatever the reason, I seem to have a lot more magnet under the spool than you would expect for a reel this size.



The magnets were attached with a stick of rod guide hot glue and a hot air gun. The clicker spring was removed to make more room for magnets.  There are four stacks of two magnets in a +-+- arrangement.  For a 1/8 or 3/16 ounce jig all the magnets are used. For a 1/4 ounce jig a magnet is removed from one of the stacks.  For a 3/8 ounce jig two magnets are removed. 

With the spool tension knobs backed off, a 3/8 ounce jig will cast 34 yards, thumb free, every time.  It's a beautiful thing.  1/4 ounce goes 29-30 yards.  3/16 ounce about 25 yards.
-steve
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« Reply #130 on: Today at 01:46:22 AM »

Here are some other easy hacks for adding a centrifugal brake.  First, the Meisselbach Tripart.  In this case, a factory free spool model.  This reel was discussed in another thread but I can't find anything around here.  



Adding a centrifugal brake is not a reversible process with this reel because the clicker button has to be cut off.



Braze the wire to a piece of 15/32 inch brass tube.



Grind the wire out of the middle leaving little nipples to fit between teeth then cut the collar off and press it onto the clicker ratchet.  Polish the wire and the inside of the tube frame where brake blocks will make contact.



An alternative approach would be to yank the clicker ratchet off the shaft.  Drill a small hole the size of the wire through the shaft.  Hammer the middle of the wire to make a flattened or square section and then press the wire into the hole.  Cut the wire to size and polish.

Another reel that would be an easy hack is the Shakespeare Standard or the Standard Professional.  They came in various sizes.  An 80 yard Standard was chopped up earlier in this thread.  These have hard rubber spacers in the head plate and tail plate.



[img width500]http://www.raingarden.us/snap/S80Cb.jpg[/img]







The problem may be finding one of these reels with intact hard rubber spacers.  All of the spacers have shrunk now.  Some were distorted or cracked when they shrank.  Others are still solid and round, just a little bit smaller than they once were.

Again, the clicker is removed.  Also, the clicker thumb dial.  The hard rubber spacer will become the race.  The cut-out where the dial was will have to be filled with something like JB Weld and the inner face polished so the brake block will ride over it smoothly.

There is a little post that the old clicker spring rested against.  It can be twisted out or cut off.  This style clicker never was very good anyway.  The ratchet used with this style clicker is small like a pinion gear.  The centrifugal break wire and collar would be very similar to that of the Horton-Meek Blue Grass above.



-steve
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