alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Penn International II 80 TW Rebuild/ Repaint
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
July 26, 2017, 10:51:55 PM *
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Author Topic: Penn International II 80 TW Rebuild/ Repaint  (Read 2350 times)
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alantani
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« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2017, 07:55:33 AM »

Thank you!
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UKChris
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« Reply #16 on: May 15, 2017, 08:02:13 AM »

Looking good! Love the spool.

Is the paint hard when dry?
I ask because I was planning to restore and re-paint a Mitchell fixed spool reel. Someone had said use heat-resistant engine paint but there was a reply to say that such paint needs the heat to make it set hard. I note you have used wheel paint not engine paint.
I was planning to try Humbrol spray enamel. I once used it on the bodywork of an old car I had and the paint was tougher than the steel!

Keep up the good work.
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PennDaddy
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« Reply #17 on: May 15, 2017, 05:30:14 PM »

Thank you!

No. Thank you. This site has helped me so much. I would have never braved a reel tune up let alone a rebuild without your tips, tricks and tactics listed here. We owe you a debt of gratitude!
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PennDaddy
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« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2017, 05:38:56 PM »

Looking good! Love the spool.

Is the paint hard when dry?
I ask because I was planning to restore and re-paint a Mitchell fixed spool reel. Someone had said use heat-resistant engine paint but there was a reply to say that such paint needs the heat to make it set hard. I note you have used wheel paint not engine paint.
I was planning to try Humbrol spray enamel. I once used it on the bodywork of an old car I had and the paint was tougher than the steel!

Keep up the good work.


Thank you.  I thought the paint was hard after 2 hours, and turned it over and laid it on a towel for some pictures. When I flipped it back over, the towels impression was left into the paint. Well that just added another day of sanding. I will update you on the hardness as I resanded and sprayed it again. It doesn't say anywhere that it needs heat to cure. I believe it has heat resistant properties, so that it won't peel or change colors from the exposure.

I am going with matte black and two colors of gray for a military plane type look. The spool looks great and the other plates are coming along. I'm getting nervous about the reassembly as it is a lot of parts.  Shocked
« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 05:54:33 AM by PennDaddy » Logged
PennDaddy
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« Reply #19 on: May 18, 2017, 05:51:43 AM »

Thank you!

No. Thank you. This site has helped me so much. I would have never braved a reel tune up let alone a rebuild without your tips, tricks and tactics listed here. We owe you a debt of gratitude!

Update:

I got the final coats on and read the instructions on the can. The VHT paint needs 7 days to harden. Ouch. I have been waiting and it has 3 more days. I'll update when it is finished.
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Rothmar2
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« Reply #20 on: May 18, 2017, 06:39:58 AM »

Top work so far Penndaddy. I have also been down this path refurbishing an old Daiwa 300 (still a work in progress) and can appreciate the effort you have put into this. Please keep us posted. This reel can stop just about anything that swims, and is well worth saving. I hope you get to catch a fish of a lifetime on it when it's completed.
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PennDaddy
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« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2017, 06:23:16 PM »

Thank you. I hope so as well.  Here's a shot of the final coat of base.



Finished side plate. It turned out very good in my mind. There are a few bubbles that turned into dimples. I assume it is from oils not completely removed. I did use brake cleaner, carb cleaner, and also aircraft remover with finally rubbing alcohol prep. Here is the finished side plate.





Here is a picture of the inside with my card board paint shield installed.



Removed. Some dust did get in from sanding so I redid the grease job.



About here is where I started learning a lesson about the tight specs of a penn reel. I will discuss this later. Notice I built up the major corrosion around the screws with the putty and actually attempted to make the screw holes sealed.



Here is the primered right side plate. Again dimples that reappeared after sanding and reprimering. I built up around the clicker where corrosion had borrowed some metal.




The finished right side plate and the tap and die cleaning out all thread holes.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 06:25:12 PM by PennDaddy » Logged
Tightlines666
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« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2017, 06:40:34 PM »

I am following this thread with great interest.  This is something I have often considered doing.  I have had some pretty badly corroded reels accross my bench.  Customers have requested cosmetic and corrosion-arresting refinishing work.  Short of refering them to anodizers, I was (and still am?) hesitant to dive into this kind of work.  Looks like it certainly can be done at home, but is likely (I suspect) time/energy expensive, likely cost prohibitive for customers reels.  Still, I may give this type of thing a try on one if my parts reels (if I am ever looking fir a project).  

Looking good!

Keep up the good work, and watch those spacing issues on the rebuild/tuning end of things.

John
« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 06:42:00 PM by Tightlines666 » Logged

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PennDaddy
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« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2017, 05:36:07 AM »

Thank you for following. I have learned many lessons which I hope will help others should they venture down this road. I will put these lessons and tips/tricks into a post when I am done. If you're a perfectionist like me, this kind of project will drive you mad. If you have reels that were as bad as this one, with a hourly rate of 10 dollars per hour, it would be cheaper for them to buy a new high end reel. I have some tips to cut some time down, but the corrosion is difficult to combat.

There is definitely spacing issues and I will get into them. I initially wanted to make thin gaskets to go around the end of reel frame, but it would be very difficult. I have painted spinning reels before, but the bigger surfaces of this reel prove to be more difficult to hide flaws. I am a little further ahead on this project than my posts but I'll keep them coming.
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PennDaddy
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« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2017, 05:46:52 AM »

Here is a picture of the refurbished clicker flat black with the bolt painted grey.



All my new parts sorted and ready. I went ahead and replaced everything with the drag as it looked worn out and unreliable.



A lot of my salvaged screws were reconditioned using CLR in a small tupper ware container for about 15 minutes with and occasional shake, followed by the same process using isopropyl alcohol.



Now I start installing hardware back onto the spool making sure to lightly grease surfaces.



I don't have a fancy greaser, so for the screws I dip them into the grease or use a Q tip for application.



First side finished with the reconditioned fully "open" bearings.


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UKChris
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« Reply #25 on: May 19, 2017, 06:05:04 AM »

I'm still loving this thread.

I have an Int. 30W that is just about perfect inside but is pug-ugly because of the corrosion outside on the frame.
I cleaned it up a bit and then painted over the corroded parts with Humbrol enamel paint - gold - which wasn't too bad a match at first. But, on reflection, it is still looking pretty ugly. The craters of corrosion are still there, just a bit golden rather than a bit black.

Do i have the courage to follow in your footsteps, sir? Not sure...
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PennDaddy
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« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2017, 09:47:29 AM »

Thanks Chris. Wait until my last tips post when I'm done and I will simplify it. It can be done. The reason I am doing it is I figured I had nothing to lose. Worst case scenario is having to re strip it down and leave it the way it was.
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PennDaddy
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« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2017, 09:51:19 AM »

On to the other side of the spool.



Here's a close up of the refinished original bearings.



Here is the original drag washers (Top) and the new upgrades (Below).



The other side...



I greased the new drag washers with Cal's. I like to use my finger, and do a rotational pattern similar to vehicle waxing. Then, I reverse the swirls.



Excess grease removed and ready for installation.



Then new drag washer and bellevilles. I will install them using the stock (()) configuration.



And here's a picture of the refinished cam. I used a very gentle wire wheel followed by a polishing wheel.



Side by side drag washers. New on the left and old on the right. The old one had deep grooves and I had to replace it.



Stock Belleville orientation. (())



Installed.





Cleaned and polished drag cap ready for jnstall.



Otherside.



Completed. Ah deep breathe.





Finished left side plate under side.

« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 10:12:10 AM by PennDaddy » Logged
PennDaddy
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« Reply #28 on: May 20, 2017, 07:02:42 PM »

Now it's time to move onto the right side of the reel. I start by lightly greasing the 2 contact surfaces between the right side plate assembly and the bridge and press together.



Then a little more grease on the inside.



Off to the side I put together the cam follower assembly. Lightly greasing everything and packing the bearings.





Now installing the brass cup that I couldn't find a name for. Again lightly greased.



Then the number 60 backing washer. I greased this lightly because it had grease on it upon disassembly.



 On to the preset drag knob installation.





And the cup now screwed into place. These small screws had washers on them.



The clicker now installed, the drag lever, washer and plate set into place.



And then screwed into place.



The refurbished main gear ready for grease and installation.




Greased and Installed with the handle.





And 2 holes that need tap and die cleaned. .

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TARFU
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« Reply #29 on: May 22, 2017, 07:04:29 AM »

Arrrgghhhh....talk about a cliff hanger....Tune in next week, same Bat time, same Bat channel.....you're killing me Smalls... Grin Grin 

Very impressive....Great work brother....Bill
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