alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Milling aluminum with drill press
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
May 22, 2018, 11:19:10 PM *
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Author Topic: Milling aluminum with drill press  (Read 1314 times)
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STRIPER LOU
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« Reply #30 on: February 10, 2018, 07:01:27 AM »

Wow, no doubt that would have and impact on anyone! I've been around machinery all my life and presses up to 350 tons.

I have a complete respect for all this equipment.

 One of my friends has been in the business for years and has gotten his younger son in to it too.

Several months ago he was working on a press, got up and really bumped his head on something and this has resulted in some neurological damage.
Truly sad as it has affected his speech, cant walk properly or think. Unfortunately they're having trouble getting to the bottom of this and he's been at Gaylord Rehabilitation Center. There they are working on getting his speech and motor skills back but its going very slowly. I really feel for him and his son. This guy has been thru hell as he lost his wife who was sick for over 10 years. Whenever I would see him it looked as though he had never gotten any sleep.


Take nothing for granted, be careful and always look to the higher power to help protect you.

............Lou
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Reel 224
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« Reply #31 on: February 10, 2018, 10:49:34 AM »

AMEN! Lou that was a sad story.

Joe
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« Reply #32 on: February 10, 2018, 12:59:30 PM »

Take nothing for granted, be careful and always look to the higher power to help protect you.

............Lou

Every one of the guys I apprenticed with have "parts missing" and either bad backs or knees/legs.  Two were killed in industrial accidents.  I am lucky that my back is still OK most of the time but both of my legs and hands are messed up.
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Hi, my name is Lee and I have a fishing gear problem.
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« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2018, 12:32:46 PM »

A past experience causes me to cringe a little any time I hear of some one asking about milling with a drill press. I dont wish for any one to take this wrong. But to take away from it & proceed in as safe a manner as possible. Always thinking ahead. Asking ones self what might go wrong. Is the work peice & all tooling secure enough for the task at hand.   I've worn many hats in my life....  

Through time, & a desire to always learn more I've a pretty good level of proficiency in a few trades. Along the way I've been hurt, had close calls, also witnessed death in these endeavours. Also others getting hurt in a life changing way. In some cases they were lucky to be alive & go on with a lesson learned.
Some times this went with the very natuire of the task at hand. I never accepted it as a rule. But looked at these situations for what ever I could take away & possibly pass on to others

 
I know we are talking of something that appears to be a simple, inexpensive way to reach a desired result. It's now come to something that is close to me.

Live life to your fullest.  Work toward enjoying & cherishing every moment of it that you can with your talents while fullfilling your worth while desires.  Along the way, with everything, dont forget to stop, slow down just for a moments time & give whats in front of you another look... Jeff

 

 
« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 01:50:15 PM by Rivverrat » Logged
steelfish
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« Reply #34 on: February 13, 2018, 12:52:44 PM »


Live life to your fullest.  Work toward enjoying & cherishing every moment of it that you can with your talents while fullfilling your worth while desires.  Along the way, with everything, dont forget to stop, slow down just for a moments time & give whats in front of you another look.

good Call Jeff, everybody needs to stop to a moment and relax a bit


PS: its good to know that pic its only a close call, Im not a handy man so, I dont like to play with big power tools.
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« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2018, 01:51:24 PM »

that's closer than close my friend...hope you mad it through that one in the long term
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« Reply #36 on: February 13, 2018, 02:35:48 PM »

I say close based on my eye still being functional & just a few inches lower could have been my throat ... Jeff
« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 09:30:45 PM by Rivverrat » Logged
Tiddlerbasher
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« Reply #37 on: February 13, 2018, 05:34:32 PM »

 Shocked  Shocked Shocked That is toooo close my friend

From my very early days in a workshop environment a friend spun up a 8" Colchester lathe - Next thing I remember is blood - lotsa blood.
The chuck key had been left in the chuck - spun out and wacked him in the thigh
A femoral bleed, I think it was, is something to behold
A couple of us had St Johns first aid training - but this was a bit different to say the least
A toilet roll was applied and CLAMPED ( I really mean clamped) in place with a tensioner and pallet strapping tape - not standard practice but it stopped a bleed out until the ambulance arrived - phew - the hospital was very close fortunately

Mick if you are still with us, and still into fishing, drop in and say hello my friend - it's been a loooong time

Chuck keys are dangerous, potentially lethal. NEVER leave them in a chuck
I park my chuck key, for the drill stand, on a magnet next to the 'Green' button - no chuck key no press button.
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« Reply #38 on: February 13, 2018, 07:20:11 PM »

Shocked  Shocked Shocked That is toooo close my friend

From my very early days in a workshop environment a friend spun up a 8" Colchester lathe - Next thing I remember is blood - lotsa blood.
The chuck key had been left in the chuck - spun out and wacked him in the thigh
A femoral bleed, I think it was, is something to behold
A couple of us had St Johns first aid training - but this was a bit different to say the least
A toilet roll was applied and CLAMPED ( I really mean clamped) in place with a tensioner and pallet strapping tape - not standard practice but it stopped a bleed out until the ambulance arrived - phew - the hospital was very close fortunately

Mick if you are still with us, and still into fishing, drop in and say hello my friend - it's been a loooong time

Chuck keys are dangerous, potentially lethal. NEVER leave them in a chuck
I park my chuck key, for the drill stand, on a magnet next to the 'Green' button - no chuck key no press button.

Thats a big issue for me.  If I walk by a lathe and see a chuck in it, I lay into who ever ran it last.  If its not in your hand, it doesnt need to be in the chuck, period.  Especially on a lathe where the start/stop is a lever on the carriage.  Someone could be walking by, bump the lever, and sling the chuck key into their face without even knowing the lathe was on. 

Machine tools are dangerous.  Dont play around, and dont do risky stuff.  The power needed to cut metal is enough to cause serious harm to a person in an instant. 
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« Reply #39 on: February 13, 2018, 10:54:14 PM »

I must admit.
I do risky stuff, but the tools I deal with are not likely to maim.
Just hand drills, buffers, sanders and air tools.
I leave the professional part making to the professionals.
I'm just a Hillbilly good with a wrench. Wink
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