alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Saltwater behind the spool
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
June 21, 2018, 05:44:27 PM *
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Author Topic: Saltwater behind the spool  (Read 1018 times)
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grekim
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« on: March 13, 2018, 03:47:03 AM »

I am not sure how obsessive to be about this.  I mainly fish a Longbeach 60 from shore or wading.  If I dunk it, I will pull it apart, clean and rebuild....no question.  But, what about on a normal day when you naturally get a few drops of water from the line that end up getting through the space where the spool meets the sideplates?  Should a service a couple times a season take care of any salt buildup?   Should the reel get dunked in freshwater?  What do you think?
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« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2018, 04:32:17 AM »

Next time you pull it apart, lightly grease the guts, the click spring and tongue, and the sides of the spool. This will keep you going. Any grease is better than none, but Penn blue or a marine bearing grease will work. You can mix it with reel oil to thin if you want to get it even lighter, looks like you do more maintenance than most out there. After than a light spray down and wipe external with Penn reel cleaner, WD40, Ballistol, Corrosion X, or whatever goes a really long way.
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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2018, 05:30:14 AM »

I was reading a thread here lately, where some guys said that in addition to hosing off their reels, they would dunk their well-greased reels in fresh water for several hours.  Sounds a bit extreme to me, but...  If I find the thread, I'll post it back here.
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Keta
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2018, 05:32:27 AM »

I soak my reels in freshwater every time I use them in saltwater.
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grekim
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2018, 06:58:33 AM »

Okay, thanks guys.  So Keta, do you let it dry assembled or do you unscrew a sideplate?  Thanks.
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2018, 07:00:27 AM »

When I do a quick after salt inspection —

On these conventional Penns it is easy —

Pop off the tail-plate, remove the spool, check for any salt buildup or water intrusion within the head or tail sides, wipe it down, regrease.

I use a grease gun with a needle to get a little extra grease around the main, pinion, jack, yoke, eccentric, etc.

Even the top of the bridge gets a light coat of marine grease.

Clamp screws are also greased.

When servicing these reels for myself and clients — for using in salt — the rings get greased underneath, as do the insides of the plates, click spring and clicker, sides of the spool, and every screw thread gets greased as the reel is assembled.  Bearings get grease and TSI321 mixed.

Always have marine grease, TSI321, WD-40, small brush, basic tools, spare screws, and a clean rag inside of a clear plastic container that goes with me wrapped with orange tape.  Occasionally it has come in handy, for others and myself.

Any time the grease has turned a lighter or milkier color — that is a sign of salt water.

Best,

Fred

« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 07:01:54 AM by foakes » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2018, 06:40:08 PM »

Okay, thanks guys.  So Keta, do you let it dry assembled or do you unscrew a sideplate?  Thanks.



Usualy just shake them out, let them air dry and then store them uncovered.
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Bill B (Tarfu)
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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2018, 07:00:38 PM »

All my Reels have been given a pre-service with grease on all internal parts.  After a salt water trip all rods with attached reels go into the shower with me for a god warm water rinse.  Then outside for a drip dry.  Then a once a year full service for heavily used reels.  Bill
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2018, 07:25:58 PM »

Lol......Bill, I think I've said this one before, but when we do our annual SD trip in July everyone always asks why there are rods in the shower after I do a couple of 1/2 day trips! Then outside to dry, and either Ardent reel clean or automotive spray was....teardown after I get home 😁
Brett
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« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2018, 03:45:48 AM »

The only thing I would add is I also tighten the drag before rinsing in fresh water. Shake of the excess. Then loosed the drag and leave to air dry. I'm still unsure if that really makes any difference to the drag Undecided
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grekim
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« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2018, 04:02:54 AM »

Okay, thanks.   After soaking, I would worry a little about fresh water not being able to escape from under the rings, but maybe life is too short.  I have a few LB 60's now and I fish the one that is in worst condition (which is actually quite good), so I will soak and it will probably last 30 more years anyway.  The other reels that I fish in saltwater are Mitchell 302's, 306's, and 402's so I guess the same would apply to them.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 04:03:30 AM by grekim » Logged

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Keta
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« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2018, 05:54:09 AM »

The only thing I would add is I also tighten the drag before rinsing in fresh water. Shake of the excess. Then loosed the drag and leave to air dry. I'm still unsure if that really makes any difference to the drag Undecided

Yup!
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« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2018, 06:37:37 AM »

Lee - is that 'Yup' it does make a difference - or 'Yup' your not sure either Grin
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Keta
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« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2018, 07:04:23 AM »

Yup, it helps keep water off the drag stack.
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« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2018, 11:00:48 AM »

As you say, it is inevitable that seawater will get behind the spool despite whatever is done to make it water tight.  If you have free spool then you have water access.  The quick and easy way to deal with the seawater is to flush it out with freshwater.  

So, why not embrace the inevitable and make drain holes and flushing holes in the side plates?  Or, just perforate everything?  Not a Penn, but you get the idea:

-steve
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 11:02:02 AM by oc1 » Logged
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