alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial USA vs Chinese Penn Jigmaster comparison video
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August 20, 2018, 02:44:54 AM *
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Author Topic: USA vs Chinese Penn Jigmaster comparison video  (Read 1736 times)
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Decker
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One fish, two fish, redfish, bluefish.


« Reply #30 on: May 14, 2018, 12:01:05 PM »

All you folks with those REALLY nice state of the art Yamaha 4 stroke outboards (or motorcycles) might wonder why the company logo is...a stylized tuning fork (reminds me - I need to yell at my kids to practice their piano this morning!). 

Wow, I didn't know that about Yamaha... that their origins come from instrument manufacturing (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamaha_Corporation).   I had a cheap Yamaha classical guitar that sounded good, a few years ago. I wonder what is about the history and culture in Japan that led to so many diverse conglomerate companies.     
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« Reply #31 on: May 14, 2018, 11:06:45 PM »

Coming late to this discussion, I think that the evolution of current Chinese Industrialisation is at the point where, quality is starting to show through, just like post WW2 Japan. To start off with it was low quality, maximum quantity, and then evolved through to quality. Just how many folks now actually go looking for electronics goods, and steer towards Japanese products - because of the quality factor??

To the defense of Chinese fishing tackle manufacturing, they are building products to whatever standard and PRICE, the client is asking for, and here price is certainly a big driving factor.

Not quite in the line of venerable Penn multipliers, but a couple of examples where Chinese manufactured products do feature highly in ranking are the Quantum Cabo range of spinners. Certainly giving the likes of Diawa and Shimano a run for market share and performance at very competitive prices, and some might even say beating the non-Japan manufactured Daiwa and Shimano for quality.

Equally, I have a 1980's Penn Spinfisher, and it is built like a tank and still functioning perfectly with minimal attention or servicing. Where current models would certainly pale into the shadows at the quality of the build. That said, there are some specialist Penn spinners coming through that do have all the makings of becoming cult status reels, because of the quality of manufacture, and made in China.

Give it time, let them develop the quality angle, and the stigma will soon be a thing of the past.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Cheers from sunny Africa

Jeri
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« Reply #32 on: May 14, 2018, 11:55:17 PM »

Aside from Penn, it seems most imported reels are being made in Korea, Malaysia or Indonesia.  Maybe the Chinese are moving on to bigger and better things.  The Japanese have already moved their production off shore.
-steve
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« Reply #33 on: May 15, 2018, 05:33:31 AM »

Aside from Penn, it seems most imported reels are being made in Korea, Malaysia or Indonesia.  Maybe the Chinese are moving on to bigger and better things.  The Japanese have already moved their production off shore.
-steve
Interesting...
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« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2018, 10:34:12 PM »

Aside from Penn, it seems most imported reels are being made in Korea, Malaysia or Indonesia.  Maybe the Chinese are moving on to bigger and better things.  The Japanese have already moved their production off shore.
-steve

Diawa and Shimano still make their very top end reels in Japan. Models like Tiagra, Saltiga, Stella and some others. Basically to have control of the quality levels. The down side is there is a disproportionate jump in the prices of those reels over the 'offshore' produced reels, basically it is down to labour costs. China is also having problems firstly getting the numbers of labour that they need, and secondly their labour costs are rising. That is why some companies ae investigating alternative options for cheaper labour. Vietnam is currently getting a lot of attention from Diawa.
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« Reply #35 on: May 16, 2018, 06:18:51 AM »

I have a Diawa 9000 milliner dx that is in good condition 45years, it has caught a lot of fish and has done millions of casts so I can attest to that reels quality.

Joe   
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« Reply #36 on: May 16, 2018, 06:20:53 PM »

I remember when I was into vintage military firearms, bolt actions.  I read a blow up strength test on a German mauser model 98 and a Japanese Arisaka.  The 98 Mauser action was often recommended for making custom hunting rifles in larger calibers.
When it came to the overloaded cartridge tests, it was the Arisaka that proved the strongest.
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