alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial floating line conditioner
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
April 13, 2021, 02:30:26 PM *
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Author Topic: floating line conditioner  (Read 421 times)
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Donnyboat
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« on: March 30, 2021, 06:53:05 AM »

Hi All, as Alan started this trout section up after I was asking several questions, on trout fishing, best I use it, or Alan will sack me.
    I have a used double taper floating line, & not sure how or what conditions it was used in the past
     Would it be a good idea, for me to wash it & maybe coat it with some kind of conditioner.
     If so, what is the best condition to use, as I am down under, what would be the best outlet  to sauce it from, @ the right price, cheers Don.
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Don, or donnyboat
oc1
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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2021, 08:05:38 AM »

Since it is a PVC coating, Armorall should work if you do not find a specialty fly line dressing.
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Tiddlerbasher
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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2021, 08:12:51 AM »

Don, I clean my fly line line(s) after each trip. I don't do the multiple buckets of soap/fresh water (well maybe once a season Undecided).
For the conditioner part (floating line only) I use Rio AgentX - it definitely helps. After each trip (if I remember Roll Eyes) I run the line through a piece of kitchen role (sometimes Rio Wonder Cloth, they work very well particularly with reel cruddy lines) then apply the AgentX.
Scientific Anglers/ Airflo etc all have their version of condioners.
Without the cleaning the line will be like a micro file and put a groove in the tip ring. The groove will then damage the fly line.
This a video describes the whole process in detail:


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Donnyboat
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« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2021, 12:47:08 PM »

Good thanks Chris, I washed it in warm dish washing water, then rinsed it twice, just have to get some dressing, it will be worth it as I will have three reels soon, 2 here & one in the mail, its only a shakespear, but was the right price for me, thanks again Chris & Steeve, cheers Don.
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Don, or donnyboat
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Andy


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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2021, 01:05:43 PM »

Cleaning frequently seems to be the best thing for them.  I have a an old bottle of Cortland line conditioner that I apply sparingly after cleaning. 

Andy
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wfjord
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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2021, 02:43:22 PM »

I sometimes clean my lines in dish detergent water with a soft cloth and a rinse, and sometimes with fly line cleaning pads.  I have bottles of various brands of line dressings / floatant for plastic coated lines, all do about the same thing.  Lots of brands out there --Umpqua, Cortland, Scientific Anglers, Gink, Loon, Rio, etc.  Pure tallow (fat from some types of hovved animals) is said to be very good, too, but I haven't tried it.

Storing lines indoors (as opposed to the garage or car trunk) can extend the life of a fly line indefinitely.  I still have some of my very first lines that are around 40 years old and still in excellent/very good condition. 
« Last Edit: March 30, 2021, 03:02:15 PM by wfjord » Logged
Tiddlerbasher
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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2021, 03:20:44 PM »

As mentioned - tallow can be used. IIRC it used to be used on hair and silk lines as a waterproofer. Personally I would only use one of the purpose made concoctions for modern lines.
You will notice the improvement on a well dressed floating line.
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Donnyboat
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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2021, 05:21:28 PM »

Thanks everone, I was going to ask a few of my mate about this, I am glad I posted it, I am sure many will benefit, from all your info, cheers Don.
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Don, or donnyboat
wfjord
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2021, 05:38:48 PM »

As mentioned - tallow can be used. IIRC it used to be used on hair and silk lines as a waterproofer. Personally I would only use one of the purpose made concoctions for modern lines.
You will notice the improvement on a well dressed floating line.

I think it was mucilin that was used on the old style hair and silk lines --I'm not sure if it's still used for that, but definitely not recommended for plastic lines.
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jurelometer
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« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2021, 09:40:10 PM »

(And now a word from our resident contrarian Smiley  )

Fly lines are a consumable product.  Check for cracks, especially around 15 to 25 feet from the tip. Once the coating is cracked or split anywhere, the line is toast.   Most modern fly line coatings (not the core) are made from PVC.  A few are Urethane.  PVC fly lines go bad goes bad from the plasticizer leaching out over time. PVC is stiff and inflexible without plasticizer.  Plasticizer loss is what leads to cracking.  UV exposure is the main enemy, but heat can contribute too (I am not sure how much heat is damaging, but I wouldn't store my fly lines in a hot car trunk for a long period, as wfjord has mentioned).
 
Overstretching the line does not help for longevity, so try not to hook too many big fish Smiley

Cleaning the fly line by running it  through a soft towel wetted with a a small amount of dish soap and water  is not a bad idea. Rinse and air dry.  Just the way Don did it.

 Fly line treatments can theoretically add a slick coating to make the line shoot faster through the guides, help the fly line float slightly better by making the surface a bit more water repellent, and protect against further UV damage.     If none of these matter for your situation, then you don't need a line treatment.  

A treatment won't introduce new plasticizer. Some fly line treatments will attract dirt in hotter climates.  Best to avoid treatments that leave a wet  or oily feel behind, like Amour-all or organic oils and fats.

The fly line makers are most likely reselling a vinyl treatment product, but they won't tell us what it is so they can sell a tiny bottle for triple the price.   If you want to use a general purpose product that has been rumored to also be used by some of the fly line companies and is popular with lots of fly fishermen, take a look at Aerospace 303 Marine.  Good for the vinyl on your boat too!

Scientific Angler has these little cleaning/buffing pads that are slightly abrasive.  If I feel like carrying more junk with me, I will carry one of these and use on the water if the line is getting grimy.  In addition to removing grime, they smooth out any small scratches.

I rarely use line treatments nowadays, but I am more of a minimalist than most.  I wash my lines when they get too dirty.  I have worn the cork grips out on rods from extended use, but have yet to damage a guide from abrasion.

-J
« Last Edit: March 30, 2021, 09:44:24 PM by jurelometer » Logged
Tiddlerbasher
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« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2021, 10:08:38 PM »

If you fish from a Yak/boat your line wont get so dirrty. I f you fish from the bank it will get filthy - eventuallly.
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