alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Quick Effective Repairs
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
October 16, 2017, 08:06:53 PM *
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Bryan Young
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« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2014, 08:15:16 AM »

Thanks for the tip Ken.  May be good to have on an extended fishing trip with some spare guides.
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Cheesy I talk with every part I send out and each reel I repair so that they perform at the top of their game. Cheesy
erikpowell
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« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2014, 12:19:39 PM »

Thanks for the tip Ken.  May be good to have on an extended fishing trip with some spare guides.

X2 Bryan. Guys, it would be wise to take that cue from Ken & Bryan. Consider Alan, he's the long range spare parts master.
Ready for any reel problem that may arise... so why not be prepared to save your (or a friends)favorite rod when you're out there.
Spare guides wouldn't be a big investment, nor would the 5min epoxy. Great tip !

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Bryan Young
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« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2014, 12:54:13 PM »

And it beats the use of duct tape.   Cheesy
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Cheesy I talk with every part I send out and each reel I repair so that they perform at the top of their game. Cheesy
Ken_D
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« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2014, 09:03:47 AM »

And it beats the use of duct tape.   Cheesy


Oh, Higher Power, give me strength !!!!   I just did a re-wrap where the sport used duckt tape... he made a strand 1/8 wide, and went for it, about 10 layers. To the size of olives each side of the guide. It took me a very long time to remove the gooey adhesive. Kinda like chewing gum in someone's hair.....But at least he got to keep fishing for the rest of his trip !!
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Ron "Jones
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« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2014, 10:39:59 AM »

One more thing to go in the rod bag!
Ron
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Ronald Jones
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coralsea
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« Reply #20 on: June 28, 2014, 05:30:58 AM »

This is the result of pulling up 17,6LB!!! weight....
Shakespeare tidewater  BTW 60 Sunr 1.83m Medium Heavy (40-130Lb line)...
What i did wrong? I bought this rod 4 or 5 years ago and never used it..Till ..today's test..
Any sugestions how it can be.. repeared?
Thank you...

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no pain-no gain
Ken_D
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« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2014, 07:09:13 AM »

Wow. Unlucky. Any repair at that place on a skookum rod as this, is experimental,, could fail on the first bottom snag, or fish.  The fastest and cheapest way is to install a re-enforced metal ferrule. Measure the blank in both inch and metric....ferrules could be sold in millimeters, or 64's, depending on the supplier.  Today's digital calipers have a dual setting, and can be had for under 10.00 shipped, from the eeb, eh? Invaluable for all phases of rodwork.     The O'Quinn link from the FAOL appears to apply to light duty projects, and may not apply to yours, but it's good info all the same. Unsure if you could find suitable donor bits, which is why I suggested you use a ferrule. Easy peasy lemon squeezy.

http://tinyurl.com/nw4xn2u
http://www.mudhole.com/Rod-Building/Ferrules
http://flyanglersonline.com/features/rodrepair/index.php
« Last Edit: June 28, 2014, 08:46:25 AM by Ken_D » Logged
coralsea
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« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2014, 03:35:09 PM »

Thank you a lot for your information, Ken_D!
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Ron "Jones
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« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2014, 07:18:13 PM »

The only repair I can see for that is a removal of all components and re install on a new blank. If you aren't a wrapper then a new rod would probably be cheaper, but you could end up with a nice rod.
Ron
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Ronald Jones
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coralsea
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« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2014, 11:25:36 PM »

Ok, got it...
My next question to  ALL is simple-how i can be sure, that my  new rod with the line test up to 100LB would easily hold 17lb weight?
p.s i have casting rod  2.10m (6.8' ) 100-400gr. bait test and line test 30LB... It holds 3,31LB weight...But if i add more weight it might be broken.and the weight would be far away from 30 LB..
Thanks..
« Last Edit: June 28, 2014, 11:31:01 PM by coralsea » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: June 29, 2014, 06:11:48 PM »

Looking for a possible replacement..
Penn Overseas Pro 212 (2,10m., 50lb)-will it fit for a fish with the weight 22LB?
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Norcal Pescador
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« Reply #26 on: July 26, 2014, 11:55:44 AM »

Thanks for the tip Ken.  May be good to have on an extended fishing trip with some spare guides.

My portable repair kit (12" long tool box) has reel and rod fixit stuff. The rod fixings are some 5-minute epoxy, 2-hour epoxy, A and D thread,a fly-tying bobbin, spare guides and tiptops, JB Weld and some other goodies.

My brother-in-law was setting out for a trip when he noticed one of his s/s guide rings had a broken weld on one side and barely connected on the other. JB Weld to the rescue! I mixed up some JB Weld, repaired his guide and let it sit overnight. Can't tell it's there (cuz it's gray) and the guide is strong as an ox.  Cool
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Rob

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Dominick
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« Reply #27 on: July 26, 2014, 01:10:13 PM »

I love JB Weld.  Dominick
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 Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking beer.
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« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2016, 11:22:10 AM »

One advantage I've noticed to using "Color Preserver" under the epoxy is if you ever need to repair that spot again, it makes removing the epoxy easier and potentially less damaging to the rod.

I just 'repaired' a rod with 5 out of 6 guides that had rusted out; every one pulled up the rod blank finish when removing the epoxy and thread.      This required filling with 5 minute epoxy and sanding, then a re-finish to make the rod look right, before putting the new set of guides on.

If it had the color preserver under the epoxy, I don't think it would have lifted the finish the way it did.
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