Hardy altex no.2 mk.V Robert Marshall Scott strip and restore

Started by Woodbilly, June 09, 2024, 11:38:38 PM

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Woodbilly

Aquired this Altex no.2 mk.V with a/r switch awhile back. I've been fishing it after a re-oiling and it works good, but the a/r is a bit cricky and upon retrieval, it has a slight catch.

Since I've restored a couple of basket cases, previously, and they turned out great, I think this one is ready for a stripping.

I haven't done one with a/r switch, but feel it isn't impossible and will proceed carefully with lots of pictures for reassembly. I've read the a/r is a bear to get back together, but with total strip, not impossible.

Going to leave all finish, as is, but will polish all brightwork as usually done.

Not sure of the year on this one, but I figure it is a later model, as it has the last version of handle retaining nut..
It needs new fiber drag washer, but other than that, it's complete.

More to come!

Woodbilly

Got the Robert Marshall Scott Altex no.2 mk.V, completely stripped down, today.

This reel is definitely different than the older Altex's I've worked on.

It has 2 slider blocks vs. one on all others I have seen.
It also has 6 bearings vs. 5, in the other's.
The drive gear is also double geared. One for the worm gear and another, on the backside, for the a/r pawl.

It also had one lone screw on body that went to nothing.
Only purpose I could possibly think of was to keep the eccentric arm from rocking internally, by means of the screw stud protruding inside body, acting as a bump stop. ??
Has anyone ever seen an Altex with 2 slider blocks and the screw to nowhere? I have seen zero reels, online, with this.

This one posed a few challenges. Thank goodness for my parts reels. Lol

Disassembly went smoothly until the bail arm/ roller screw had to be removed. It would only come out 2 turns and then seize up. I tried filing the backside in case the stud end happened to be slightly riveted, but still no luck. Had to drill it out and hit the parts bin. Problem solved.

The 2nd slider block screws would not budge. The other block screws came out simply.
I fiddled with them, to no avail and boogered them up badly. I just had to end up drilling and tapping them free.
Again, to the parts bin. Ugh.

I had to remove flier and dust cover, to fully get to the a/r switch and pin. Once dust cover was removed, pin was extracted easily. I can see why this part of the mk.V cannot be serviced without strip down. I assume, virtually impossible to get to from side access opening.

I also had to modify my collet removal tool, as it was to wide to get down into the longer no.2 body. A few passes on the bench grinder and it was good to go. I haven't done a no.3, yet, so I may need a longer one for it. IDK

Well, it's coming along with hiccups, but stripped and ready for cleaning and polishing.

sandbar

Great pictures !
I'm really interested in how the anti-reverse comes together.
I purchased an unfortunate looking older model on EBay recently and am eagerly awaiting its arrival.
Looking forward to attempting a restoration. 
Thanks for your posts.
-Steve

Woodbilly

Quote from: sandbar on June 10, 2024, 12:55:06 AMGreat pictures !
I'm really interested in how the anti-reverse comes together.
I purchased an unfortunate looking older model on EBay recently and am eagerly awaiting its arrival.
Looking forward to attempting a restoration. 
Thanks for your posts.
-Steve

Anytime!
 That's the main reason for my detailed pictures. When I was stripping my first Altex, I went at it blind, as I could really find nothing, as everyone is hesitant to completely strip these Aktex's, which I get.
 Thanks for the words.
Cheers!

Donnyboat

Thanks Billy, very interesting, your pictures tell us how important it is to use the perfect fitting screw drivers, less scratches on the metal, & you can also manage the screws better, some time you need a bit of heat, even if you use a very hot soldering iron, to get the heat to the point, without doing any dammage, good luck, cheers Don.
Don, or donnyboat

Woodbilly

Quote from: Donnyboat on June 10, 2024, 01:44:42 AMThanks Billy, very interesting, your pictures tell us how important it is to use the perfect fitting screw drivers, less scratches on the metal, & you can also manage the screws better, some time you need a bit of heat, even if you use a very hot soldering iron, to get the heat to the point, without doing any dammage, good luck, cheers Don.

Thanks, Don!

For some reason, these particular screws would not budge. I didn't try any heat, but solder gun tip will be kept in mind, in case it's needed next time.
I have full jewelers drive set and split nut removal tool, so that wasn't the issue.
The brass screw pictured are my parts screws and I have yet to tidy them via needle file.
 I'm also saving the drilled screws, as they still have enough meat on the head body to make into allen heads for parts.
All scratches were already present. I'm always careful in that aspect, even with a battle scarred beauty.
These tiny brass screws are very fragile and deform easily, so the correct driver is a must, but I can only vouch for myself. Lol

Woodbilly

Since I have stripped and restored a few Altex reels and left finish original, I have decided to paint the current no.2 that I am working on, now.
Here's the paint I've chosen. Not a perfect match, but i sprayed a bunch and this one was close. Matte in color, but with still a very slight sheen, like Altex original finish.
I don't normally mess with finish, but have several resto's that I left original, so this one I want to see what a new paint job would look like.

Dupli-Color next to dust cover with original finish.
  More to come!

sandbar

I just received a No.2 Mk.V
Not sure who this reel maker is.

sandbar

Just found it.
Robert Marshall Scott
Reel maker from (1916 - 1967)

Woodbilly

Quote from: sandbar on June 12, 2024, 06:50:40 PMJust found it.
Robert Marshall Scott
Reel maker from (1916 - 1967)

 See my title... lol

 If you need any help with this stripping, feel free to ask or see one of my other Altex strip threads.
 Plenty of info and pictures.

Cheers!!

sandbar

Quote from: Woodbilly on June 12, 2024, 08:12:14 PM
Quote from: sandbar on June 12, 2024, 06:50:40 PMJust found it.
Robert Marshall Scott
Reel maker from (1916 - 1967)

 See my title... lol

 If you need any help with this stripping, feel free to ask or see one of my other Altex strip threads.
 Plenty of info and pictures.

Cheers!!

That's why I could never be a detective. :d

sandbar


Woodbilly

Quote from: sandbar on June 12, 2024, 08:19:43 PMIf I need parts I just contact you?

I have no parts for sale, but can help you with any questions.
If I had more parts reels, I'd be happy to sell some parts, but they're just too scarce to get rid of, right now and my parts reels cost $75 a piece,incomplete, but we'll worth it, as there are no aftermarket parts available,  but bail springs.
My best advice is just get proper jewelers screwdriver set, tiny punch which will still need filed smaller, needle files,
and snap ring removal jaws for collet removal tool.
See my Edward Broadfoot thread. It has pictures of collet tool I made. A must have.
Take lots of pictures.

Good luck. With proper tools, not that difficult,  really.

Cheers!

Woodbilly

Back with updates!

Got all the little bits polished up and noticed a few intricacies with this one.

The 2 slider blocks are different thicknesses and mounting screws are different styles.
One pair is tapered head and other pair is flat back head.

This shows the handmade flair of these old reels. No cookie cutter parts anywhere.

I had to use a round needle file and file the inner sleeve of the line roller, to enlarge it, as it was a bit tight on the new stud I pulled off my parts reel, after the original stud had to be drilled out for removal.

Once again, showing hand crafting of these reels.

Eccentric arm is notched on one end. I haven't seen this style before. I think this was done for clearance due to having 2 slider blocks.

The badges on this old girl were some of the most wore down I have seen. I'm thinking this reel has seen alot of service in its life. It's not done, yet, either. Lol

I'll be moving on to working on polishing the flier and spool, next.

More to come!

Gfish

Very interesting construction. I gonna spend some time looking at this one. The gear box is one piece with access plates? Looks strong as can practically be. The handle knob looks to be some kinda rivet with an oil hole?
Thanks for all the detail.
Fishing tackle is an art form and all fish caught on the right tackle are"Gfish"!