Reel Repair by Alan Tani

General Maintenance Tips => General Questions and Trouble Shooting => Topic started by: Sandbar33 on January 14, 2011, 06:33:32 AM



Title: Metal polish
Post by: Sandbar33 on January 14, 2011, 06:33:32 AM
I have been fighting this metal corrosion cleaning issue and losing (lol). Tried vinegar, elbow grease, you name it......I am trying to get the reel frame clean and rid of this saltwater stain that seems to be baked on. Has anybody tried using a dremel and a good metal polish like Blue Magic or would I be just wasting my time? I am probably asking for too much but I am a perfectionist when it comes to this stuff.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Bryan Young on January 14, 2011, 07:08:16 AM
I am probably asking for too much but I am a perfectionist when it comes to this stuff.
I would say probably asking too much.  But I'd say try it and let us know the results.  Please take pics before and after to show us the results.

Thank you,
Bryan


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Phinaddict on January 14, 2011, 07:14:14 AM
You didnt state what type of metal you are trying to clean.  If it is chrome or aluminum, you do not want to use the Dremel. If it is stainless, you might try it but doing it by hand will yield better results.

If the parts are chrome, (like the base and bars of Penn reels), you might be better off looking at parts replacement.

Sometimes, what appears to be corrosion is just stuck on gunk. Always be sure to do a good solvent cleaning before you start on the corrosion.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Sandbar33 on January 14, 2011, 07:26:50 AM
You didnt state what type of metal you are trying to clean.  If it is chrome or aluminum, you do not want to use the Dremel. If it is stainless, you might try it but doing it by hand will yield better results.

If the parts are chrome, (like the base and bars of Penn reels), you might be better off looking at parts replacement.

Sometimes, what appears to be corrosion is just stuck on gunk. Always be sure to do a good solvent cleaning before you start on the corrosion.

The reels are abu garcia 6500c3's.....I am guessing stainless steel?


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Bryan Young on January 14, 2011, 07:29:17 AM
It is probably aluminum or stainless depending on the part.  Aluminum polish like mothers works great, working by hand.  If stainless, buffing will bring out the shine, but if the stains are deep in the pores of the metal, it could very well be permanent.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Sandbar33 on January 14, 2011, 07:31:32 AM
This gunk is typical baked on saltwater corrosion..... and stubborn as hell (lol)


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Fishead on January 14, 2011, 09:18:46 AM
Is this a stain or has the corrosion eaten into the metal?.if its eaten into the metal,you may get most of it but it may be too deep in the metal to get it all.I like a product similar to flitz but a lot easier to use & remove.It is a marine product called Star Clean,you apply it with a wet terry cloth or micro fiber cloth & polish it while wet,then rinse it off & wipe dry.....done.works well on all metals.put a coat of wax on after if you want some extra protection from the elements.beware,once you try it,you will find all kinds of things to clean & polish because it is quick & easy and works so well.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: alantani on January 14, 2011, 10:22:40 AM
yeah, unless it's stainless steel, it's pretty much a loosing battle. 


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: TimH on January 27, 2011, 07:15:34 PM
Would u guys advise using polish on the brass gears?


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: alantani on January 27, 2011, 07:17:32 PM
nothing.  even with a little corrosion, they work fine.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Sandbar33 on January 28, 2011, 03:14:24 AM
As I started looking into the polishing thing I picked 1 reel to experiment with. It is a 6500ssc, my favorite reel and the 1 reel I am most in "tune" with. All I did was polish the inside of the pinion gear, the ends of the spool axle, the brake ring and the brass shims and you can tell a distinct difference in the smoothness of the reel. The axles in my opinion seem to be pretty smooth without polishing but the brass pinion and shims get gunked up easily as can the brake ring.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: alantani on January 28, 2011, 01:00:45 PM
honestly, the answer is to take those old parts, strip off the old chrome and have them re-chromed at a shop that will do a decent job.  i have seen penn chrome literally peel off. 


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: codhead on January 30, 2011, 03:42:34 PM
This gunk is typical baked on saltwater corrosion..... and stubborn as hell (lol)

Anything like this?

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4076/4776361359_a7ce734a17.jpg)

That's what I call salt corrosion


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: alantani on January 30, 2011, 06:48:47 PM
and people still ask why i grease the screws on the reel seat......  :-\


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: kamuwela on January 31, 2011, 01:26:19 AM
thats not too bad alan, ive had someone tell me that the grease causes corrosion. :-\


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Bryan Young on January 31, 2011, 06:55:05 AM
There are grease that absorbs water easily and can be corrosive.  There are also some grease that are for use with specific metals that can also be corrosive with other metals through the chemical interaction.  And last is if there are a lot of ridges in the grease, impurities, such as salt, can accumulate on the metal, then degrade the grease at that particular location and will be corrosive.  Regular maintenance is the best option.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Fishead on February 12, 2011, 02:38:50 PM
That whole ugly mess could have been prevented by removing the reel foot when it was new & putting a good coating of tef-gel on it & the screw holes.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: codhead on February 19, 2011, 01:15:02 AM
That whole ugly mess could have been prevented by removing the reel foot when it was new & putting a good coating of tef-gel on it & the screw holes.

Not guilty m'lud.

I bought that reel at a car boot sale (£35 for the Everol 4/0 and a Penn GLS 25). I've just had to get an allen screw head machined out of the gear housing, it was only the head that was seized in, once that was removed, the screw thread came out easily. The Everol was manufactured in the late 60s and I seriously doubt that it has been serviced since it came out of the factory in Italy. Now I've got the gear housing free, I can continue the strip down, Order the required parts from Paolo and then restore it to something like its former glory. One thing's for sure, that old Everol will still be cranking fish long after I've slipped off this mortal coil


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: ChampionShip on April 14, 2011, 10:21:15 AM
After seeing some of those pics I am sooooooo glad I live in the Great Lakes area and don't have to worry about salt corrosion.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: racoonbeast on May 08, 2011, 01:31:08 PM
I will share one of my polishing methods. I have brought back many reel parts, including Bakelite, to a new or better than new condition by using walnut shells impregnated with "jeweler's rouge", which is basically rust, and tumbling the part in a rock tumbler for a week or two. It is an extremely mild abrasive (milder than tootpaste) that can be bought in stick or powder form almost anywhere. You want the powder for tumbling, and the stick for impregnating a wheel on a Dremel for those quick jobs that just need a little help. Crushed walnut shells can be bought in almost any pet store as it is a poplular "lizard litter". It takes patience and time, but there is no danger of going too far or taking too much off. The bigger the problem, the longer the tumble. I have taken a set of Accurate stainless steel gears that worked fine in my Penn 500 rebuild, but sounded like a can of marbles rolling down hill. I gave them a week and a half tumble. When they were done, I could see myself in them, any microscopic burs were gone, and the reel is silent gear-wise and butter smooth. This works real well on brass parts and gears in about half the time.

Its not the solution for every polishing problem, but has solved many of mine. One word of advise. If you are polishing something with threads inside like a post that goes across a Penn or other reel, this stuff really cakes up in the threads and needs a very thorough, careful cleaning before using. Soap and water along with a half a dozen Q tips usually does the job fine.   


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: xaf on May 09, 2011, 01:54:16 PM
What kind/size tumbler are you using.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: racoonbeast on May 09, 2011, 08:02:00 PM
The best answer to the question is one that is too small for large parts of large conventional reels. It is approx 4.5 inches in diameter, and 4.5 inches long. It costs about forty bucks. I did not want to invest too much money in a tumbler until I saw how it worked. I would recommend one twice that size for sideplates, longer handles etc...

The other thing to remember about tumblers that I forgot to mention is that you need to be concious of mixing materials. A Bakelight or aluminum side plate would get pretty messed up if tumbled in the same batch with stainless steel parts.

I am impressed enough with the results to be planning to buy a larger one for the few big pieces that will need a bigger one, but the one that I have now will handle most parts of a large reel except the parts that I have noted and is probably the one that will get the most use. 


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: SierraBob on May 10, 2011, 10:00:01 AM
If no luck cleaning the bad spots ya can always look on eBay for a used reel like yours. Sometimes ya can pick them up for a reasonable price then you can combine the best parts of both reels.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: racoonbeast on May 12, 2011, 10:35:08 AM
Good suggestion. Thanks. I actually have used this approach in the past while building target grade Colt 1911 hand guns. I would usually buy three to five of them, depending on how many I could find at the "right" price, disasemble them into a huge pile of parts. Carfefully mike each part until I got one gun with will all parts matched as closely in tolerance as can be. Build my gun, reassemble the others, sell them, and often get mine for free or pretty close to it. There is no reason this method would not work with reels even better. Most reels and their parts are not serial numbered, thus non-matching serial numbers on parts would not detract from the value to any prospective buyer who cared about such things.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Kurly Kiwi on June 19, 2011, 02:47:02 AM
I've just been reading through this thread and have seen a few interesting comments.
I'm not sure if everyone is awares, but the corrsion that is common to form in the aluminium of your fishing reel, and why screws get stuck etc is because of "galvanic corrosion". The aluminium and stainless steel are electrically different, such that when forced together, ie s/s screw into aluminium body,a current flows, and the aluminium starts to get eaten away. The problem is compounded with salt water which is acting as a very good electrolyte.  (All types of corrosion is electron flow)

A note to ChampionShip - reels in fresh water will still suffer this type of corrosion too, as it's different metals touching each other related - it's just not happening as fast as those is salt water.
Sandbar33 - this stain you refer to sounds like corrosion into the crystal structure of the metal so it will not pollish out - sorry.
As everyone has already discovered - this type of corrosion can be significantly reduced by the application of a coating product, the marine grease works real well, as highlighted by Alan.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: fish4life on July 02, 2011, 12:54:25 PM
There can be two different issues: Discoloration and corrosion. If is it corrosion you are trying to eliminate, then sand paper and high end compounds are the only ways to recreate a flush and smooth surface. If it is discoloration, then you must use the same process, but dig deeper and deeper, although the surface may already be satisfactorily flush and smooth, until the discoloration is removed. Discoloration will have no effect on performance. If it is a coating which is corroded, then you must have it refinished as Alan said.

When it comes to sandpapers and compounds, you must be careful of how coarse of powerful (dremel) your tools and materials are. Otherwise, you will be creating your own set of issues. After refinishing, make sure you protect with a grease as mentioned by others, or the problems will reoccur even faster since the original finish has be removed.

Also, look into some "On Off" http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=2339 (http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=2339). It will completely strip the surface, prepping it well for refinishing, and potentially removing you problem all together. However, keep away from bearing and re-grease and oil after use.

Good luck,

Tony


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: BurningHeart on August 04, 2011, 01:55:44 PM
I've user CLR to take some of the green stuff of of the chrome/stainless stuff. It will also take some of the crusted salt off too.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Rodman on October 31, 2011, 09:18:57 PM
A good advert for cleaning your reel after every fishing trip and also get it serviced more regularly


Ken
Frazorodz
Rodz & Reelz Repairs
Australia


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: inhotpursuit on November 15, 2011, 08:13:17 PM
 Being the clutz that i am ,i take more than one or two tumbles a year hopping over slippery rocks last years damage was to my cherished conquest 201 dc i was playing a decent sized salmon and slipped landing on my reel,i did manage to land the fish even got it on film,
[youtube]ZV5Il2MoAvM[/youtube]

but i bent the drive shaft and scratched/gouged the reel frame quite severly. I used diamond/rubber lapping bits  felt dremel bits and mothers mag and wheel polish , i carefully remove the powder coat with the diamond impregnated lapping bits and i must stress "carefully"then polished the reel with the mothers mag polish,the downside is it has to be polished with a microfibre cloth after each use,heres a pic with a 101dc for comparison and the tools needed

(http://i1017.photobucket.com/albums/af297/inhotpursuit55/SAM_0391.jpg)


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: boghy on November 29, 2011, 08:40:20 PM
A year ago, while i did some snorkeling i found a conventional reel, that appeared to be in the water for quit a while, full with sand, barnacles, rust u name it. The CLR worked excellent. Make sure you wear gloves though - the solution is pretty strong for bear hands.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Alto Mare on November 30, 2011, 03:17:06 AM
A year ago, while i did some snorkeling i found a conventional reel, that appeared to be in the water for quit a while, full with sand, barnacles, rust u name it. The CLR worked excellent. Make sure you wear gloves though - the solution is pretty strong for bear hands.
Lets not give that CLR all the credit. If it's still working, it has to be a Penn......a US made Penn ;D.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Norcal Pescador on November 30, 2011, 07:39:08 AM
A year ago, while i did some snorkeling i found a conventional reel, that appeared to be in the water for quit a while, full with sand, barnacles, rust u name it. The CLR worked excellent. Make sure you wear gloves though - the solution is pretty strong for bear hands.
Lets not give that CLR all the credit. If it's still working, it has to be a Penn......a US made Penn ;D.
;D ;D ;D


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: boghy on November 30, 2011, 08:42:48 PM
Actually, that was an Okuma Convector CN 30D - probably that's why the owner didn't want to swim for his reel and rod. Anyway, the reel was 80% recovered, needed new spool and few other small parts. For $30 in parts it came back alive.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Irish Jigger on December 01, 2011, 01:17:46 AM
Recovered Penns are classified as "Treasure Trove" ;)


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: trout250 on December 29, 2011, 03:46:27 PM
once you get the grease off the gears clr in an ultrasonic clr will make gears etc look brand new, it will eat most corrision off , then use dremel toll fitted with a wood arbor/skisk kabob skewer split with a fazor blade abd wrapped with a piece of cape cod polishing cloth or 4ought steel wool then cape cod cloth. you can polish to a mirror finish


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Ken_D on January 01, 2012, 09:15:45 AM
Good tips !!!


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: WeyeFisherCO on February 22, 2012, 07:06:57 PM
I use POL polish on everything and it works great after you remove the heavy dirt.

[I also use it to clean electron microscopes]

It might be tough to find in some places, it's made in Germany by Hohn & Hohn GmbH

Tightlines


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Eatmycatch on April 13, 2012, 08:36:11 AM
Sandbar ~ if you are just looking to upgrade your reel frame posts. There is this guy on ebay who makes stainless steel frame posts for a number of popular penns. His name is "fishingreel79". Go to his store, his frame posts fit perfectly as I have bought them for 3 different reels and the prices are cheap (actually comparable to the cheap chrome over brass prices), the threads are strong, the fits are right on the money and they never rust or corrode. He also makes various other parts handles and such.

He don't make spools however or stands, he does make stand locks but not the stands themselves.

Hope this helps you a little...did you ever notice the harder you scrub off that corrosion it keeps getting more brown looking? ??? That is the brass coming through the crome overlay, all that is happening is the crome is being scrubbed off and the brass is coming through...I say this not only to you in particular in case you already know this...there are probably other people reading these threads who are afraid to ask the question for fear of looking foolish, and this forum is about helping people and being kind to one another.

Regards,

Catch


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Silent Hunter on July 25, 2012, 01:15:27 AM
fishingreel79's name is Tong (Tony) Nguyen and he is one of the "good guys". He accidently sent me the wrong frameposts for an Inter 30 and corrected his mistake instantly when advised and at no charge to me - told me to keep the wrong ones.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: outdoorsaddiction on August 26, 2012, 04:20:47 PM
Have any of you guys ever used Brasso on your metals?  I use it on mine and it cleans and polishes very well.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Norcal Pescador on August 29, 2012, 05:45:01 PM
Have any of you guys ever used Brasso on your metals?  I use it on mine and it cleans and polishes very well.
Yep. Use it often without reservation.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Stuck on December 10, 2012, 10:11:43 PM
A cheap and easy way remove the green growth from chrome work is to scrunch up a ball of aluminium foil, pour a little bit of Coca Cola (the real stuff works best) on it and polish away.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: charliep on February 21, 2013, 06:08:02 PM
I've had pretty good luck getting rid of gunk and mild corrosion on Garcia reel frames with Hoppe's #9 solvent. Let it set for a while and most of the gunk gets pretty loose. Scrub, rinse with naptha, etc. and polish with a good metal polish of your choice. Hoppe's works well on old dried grease too.
charliep


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: SteveA on February 22, 2013, 08:46:32 AM
Did anyone try Nevr-Dull? I think Eagle One is the brand this product is sold under. It comes in a metal can and is like cotton or wool with a chemical on it. I used Nevr-Dull to clean the surface rust on chromed bumpers and rims. It's pretty good - got the rust from brake dust off the chrome. I never tried it on reels but I think it will work. This product is non-abrasive so it will not scratch the finish. Just tear off a piece and rub the area you want to clean - just like when you polish your car. Wipe off the residue with a clean cloth.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Fullstrike on March 11, 2013, 08:21:14 AM
Try this stuff

SHEILA SHINE (http://www.sheilashineinc.com/)

Works great on both SS and aluminum.  Can be purchased on line or a local HD, Ace etc at a very reasonable cost.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Rockfish1 on May 14, 2013, 04:02:27 PM
I've had really good results with Happich Simichrome Polish.  I use it on guns to remove light corrosion without cutting through the blueing and on fishing reels to remove salt crud and stains without wrecking the substrate......seems fine on plated, anodized, and bare metal of just about any kind.  Toughest of all:  It cleans up the "rust" spots on stainless boat rails like a charm!
Fairly pricey - $10 -$12 bucks for a couple ounce tube, but a little goes a LONG way.  Seems to have just about unlimited shelf life - I've got a tube on my gun bench that must be fifteen years old and working fine.  Lots of internet sources and can sometimes be found in hardware stores.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: kapnd on June 23, 2013, 01:34:20 PM
I have some spots on my Penn Internationals that I'd like to polish out, but am not sure if the polish (Mothers) will affect the gold anodized finish?
Some spots look like waterspots, others are pretty obviously fish guck, very well baked into the finish.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Norcal Pescador on June 24, 2013, 09:40:01 AM
I'd try the Simichrome as Rockfish1 recommends. It's made for aluminum. You can also get it at most auto supply stores.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Shark Hunter on August 17, 2013, 02:16:48 PM
I just use regular turtle wax chrome polish. It is cheap and you can find it ant any auto parts store. It works great on my Senators. If the corrosion is through the chrome plating, it won't take it off, but it shines it up and makes it harder to notice. ;D


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: 1bayouboy on October 07, 2013, 07:26:12 AM
Hi everyone,

  I'm knew to this board and to reel wrenching as well.   While I've always pulled the apart to
lube them, I never really looked at them as items ripe for some customization to make them better.
That's changed now....;)   I also do quite a lot of tinkering on guns and there are a lotof products and tools
that look like they apply to reel work.    For polishing metal I use Cratex wheels with a dremel or even drill.
They come in different grits and can put a mirror finish on most metals, especially if you develop a
delicate touch with them.

Darrel


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: T Rad on October 25, 2013, 05:53:02 AM
 :o I know this is somewhat of an old topic but the product Sheila Shine is recommended in a post and I thought I would comment on that. I teach chemistry and physics to high school kids and one of the things I make sure they know how to do is look up and read Material Safety Data Sheets, (MSDS). Any product sold in the US must have one of these sheets somewhere available, usually on the website, and workplaces are supposed to keep them for all products they use. Some workplaces are exempt or keep them in a central office location. The sheet for Sheila Shine is attached. This is a fairly hazardous product with quite a few health warnings. Being an old diabetic who has had cancer and asthma, I tend to pay a little more attention to these things than some folks, ....maybe. Be careful what you  use and how you use it. I worked five years as a plant chemist for a power plant start-up and five years as a chemical sales engineer for Calgon Industrial. Some things are just not worth the risk when a little elbow grease and safer products will do the job. Just my opinion and my 2 cents worth, as they say. Cheers!


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Shark Hunter on October 25, 2013, 06:09:43 AM
Good point T Rad!
Nobody fixed your Avatar yet?


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Hook um on January 23, 2014, 07:23:10 AM
A rod building friend of mine has been using Lime-A-Way to remove corrosion and salt build-up on Chrome/Stainless reel parts, rod guides, and roller tips for many years. It comes in a green bottle and can be found in most hardware stores (Lowes, Home Depot, Etc) 28oz for about $7.00. Just soak or dip the piece in Lime-A-Way for 2 minutes, rinse with water, and wipe dry. You may need a second treatment if the metal is in very bad shape.

I then coat the piece with TSI 321 and most look almost new.
Like others have mention it won’t fix badly pitted metal parts, but this is as easy as it gets!

It does not harm rods, plastic, or threads but DO NOT USE ON ALUMINUM…



Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Maxed Out on May 07, 2014, 05:59:45 PM
This gunk is typical baked on saltwater corrosion..... and stubborn as hell (lol)

Anything like this?

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4076/4776361359_a7ce734a17.jpg)

That's what I call salt corrosion


Yes that is corrosion under that reel seat, but in this case it is caused by electrolysis from 2 different metals. A big wad of grease in there probably would have totally prevented it from ever happening.

and greasing the screws is a must or you may find it impossible to remove screws later on......looks like one is stuck in that reel pictured. Time for a replacement reel seat.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: the_reel_doc on October 27, 2014, 03:29:18 PM
  There is also a product called Bar Keeper's Friend that works well. It comes in a container like Comet and is usually close by in the store. About $2 for a container. Wet the metal and sprinkle some on, let set for a couple of minutes and use a toothbrush to clean.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Tightlines667 on October 27, 2014, 03:34:46 PM
...using Lime-A-Way to remove corrosion and salt build-up...
It does not harm rods, plastic, or threads but DO NOT USE ON ALUMINUM

Yep.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Eric Hensel on November 10, 2014, 11:58:14 AM
I have some spots on my Penn Internationals that I'd like to polish out, but am not sure if the polish (Mothers) will affect the gold anodized finish?
Some spots look like waterspots, others are pretty obviously fish guck, very well baked into the finish.

I haven't read the entire thread, but the manufacturers do us no favors when naming these products (some cleaners are solvents, some are abrasive).
Simichrome is an abrasive 'polish' that is used to make dull bare-metal shiny. It should not be used on metal with a coating (lacquer, anodising, etc) because it will remove the coating.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: handi2 on November 25, 2014, 05:27:19 AM
I have been using Blue Magic for years but purchased some of the Happich Simichrome Polish on Amazon for $25.95 for a large can. It is amazing..! The shine is much more brilliant than any other stuff I used. It does have the same ammonia smell as the Blue Magic.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Maxed Out on November 26, 2014, 05:40:22 PM
I have tried tons of things thru the years, but hands down the best is Eagle One Nevr-Dull original wadding polish. Easily takes off 60 year old dried on grease, polishes all metals AND it also is the best at cleaning and shining penn sideplates. No mess or toxic odors and same wadding can be re-used. I buy mine at the local auto parts store for $6 or $7 and that can lasts a long time , just keep the lid on or the wadding will dry out.

Ted


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Alto Mare on November 26, 2014, 06:37:51 PM
I have tried tons of things thru the years, but hands down the best is Eagle One Nevr-Dull original wadding polish. Easily takes off 60 year old dried on grease, polishes all metals AND it also is the best at cleaning and shining penn sideplates. No mess or toxic odors and same wadding can be re-used. I buy mine at the local auto parts store for $6 or $7 and that can lasts a long time , just keep the lid on or the wadding will dry out.

Ted
You made me a believer ;) ;D.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Long Enuff on March 09, 2016, 05:27:48 AM
For the really bad "green corrosion" I use very fine steel wool wet with WD-40, makes short work of it.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: RowdyW on March 09, 2016, 06:12:48 AM
For the really bad "green corrosion" I use very fine steel wool wet with WD-40, makes short work of it.

You might want to try a 1/2 hour soak in white vinegar & scrub with an old tooth brush. The vinegar will get into the crevices better & neutralize  the corrosion. Oils will cover the corrosion not neutralize it.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: foakes on March 09, 2016, 08:27:26 AM
For the really bad "green corrosion" I use very fine steel wool wet with WD-40, makes short work of it.

You might want to try a 1/2 hour soak in white vinegar & scrub with an old tooth brush. The vinegar will get into the crevices better & neutralize  the corrosion. Oils will cover the corrosion not neutralize it.

Yep, Rowdy is absolutely right -- plain ole white vinegar -- a gallon is really cheap.

Got to neutralize the Verdigris (Green Corrosion) first -- otherwise it will continue to smolder until there is nothing left -- about 200 years, or so.

If neutralized, the pits will of course still be there -- but that is as far as they will go -- and they will no longer be green. 

I like to use "0000" steel wool afterwards -- then Ted showed us how to use Never-Dull for the finish.

Best,

Fred


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Donnyboat on September 11, 2017, 06:00:35 PM
Yes every one very interesting topic, and I have learnt a lot, thanks, my question is, I have cleaned an alloy reel plate, that I wish to display, if I coat it with marine grease, it will collect dust esetra, is there any product that I can give it a protective coat with, this is alloy, cheers Don, & thanks.


Title: Re: Metal polish
Post by: Tiddlerbasher on September 12, 2017, 01:27:19 AM
Wipe it over with CorrosionX - the ordinary thin stuff - leave overnight - then polish it :-\