Reel Repair by Alan Tani

General Maintenance Tips => Fishing Antiques and Collectables => Topic started by: basto on September 03, 2019, 07:44:56 PM



Title: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 03, 2019, 07:44:56 PM
Hi Everyone
Would anyone have a photo of the drag washer sequence of a Graeme Takapart conventional reel. Or even a schematic of any kind for this reel?
This reel was made in Australia in 1949.
regards
Basto


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: Gfish on September 04, 2019, 06:50:14 AM
Interesting. Never heard of it. Pictures possible?


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 04, 2019, 03:04:27 PM
Photos are very poor, as I am away from home at present. I will take photos of everything when I pull it apart.
It has a threaded ring on each end of the reel that holds the end plates in position, making it possible to rotate the end plates 360 degrees and also making a very strong frame.
cheers
Greg

(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/graeme%20takapart%201949_zpsnemna2wy.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/IMG_2616_zpsahzbwhdc.jpg) 


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: xjchad on September 04, 2019, 03:12:04 PM
Greg,
That is a very interesting looking reel!
I can't wait to see what it looks like as you take it apart!


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 04, 2019, 03:41:58 PM
Yes, not bad engineering for 1949. The only plastic on it is the handgrip.
The side plates are anodised aluminium.
You could do a very quick spool change from either end of the reel.
Greg


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: oc1 on September 04, 2019, 09:43:36 PM
Interesting; that one Greg. A later-day tube reel with a star drag.  Tube reels usually have excellent alignment because of the one piece frame. I wonder if they died out because there is so much cutting waste?  The frame really did start out as a piece of tubing.
-steve


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 04, 2019, 10:16:40 PM
Yes Steve. There is very little gap between the frame and spool. I think the material waste would be well worth the advantages gained in strength and precise alignment.
Greg

ps....what era were tube reels you mention?


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: oc1 on September 05, 2019, 03:10:11 AM
what era were tube reels you mention?
The Meisselbach Tripart and Meisselbach Takeapart were about 1910 to 1930.  The Horton Simplex and B.F. Meek & Sons Blue Grass reels were about 1920 to 1940.  All can be found at auction today, especially the Tripart.  

In their day, the early tube reels were a little less expensive than the post-type frames.  But, they're almost bullet proof and still cast really well considering the  heavy brass spool.

Their Achilles heel is having a screw-on side plate become frozen in place.  It is very fine thread and does not take much corrosion or debris to seize it.  The Horton Simplex (and maybe some of the others too) have reverse thread on the tail plate so the spinning spool can not vibrate the tail plate loose.  But if someone didn't know it was revere thread and used a lot of force trying to unscrew it in the wrong direction it could become frozen in place forever.

-steve

p.s.  I wonder why one of the star points on your Graeme has that bulbous tip?


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: Crow on September 05, 2019, 04:20:40 AM
I think you're seeing the handle counterweight, Steve.


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 05, 2019, 03:11:49 PM
Yes Steve, that is the handle counter weight.
Thanks for the info about the other tube reels. I will have to look them up.
Greg


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 08, 2019, 04:18:51 PM
Well, she's no beauty queen, but except for making a new drag, everything else seems to be working.

(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/P1060046_zpsrechbqfx.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/P1060044_zps1lcsvimx.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/P1060033_zpsatermu9q.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/P1060025_zps7qpu1yb4.jpg)

The drag is not all there. I found one metal washer and a broken fibre washer and a rusty steel spring.
Some work to do there and if anyone has any ideas about the drag, they are very welcome.
One thing to note is that the gear sleeve is round all the way. No keyway.

(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/gear%20sleeve_zpseoioo7uf.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/drag_zpsbit6qnuy.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/broken%20fibre%20washer_zpsf7gg57fs.jpg)

A few pics of the eccentric setup.

(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/pivot%20and%20eccentric%20slots_zpspjwypwm2.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/eccentric%20lever_zpslcgiefpu.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/back%20of%20right%20sideplate_zpsvx6qfi1o.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/bottom%20of%20headplate_zpsvsgboqt5.jpg)

thanks for waiting
Greg


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: oc1 on September 08, 2019, 09:56:35 PM
A sophisticated Koph clutch.  Very sophisticated.

Is the main gear, ratchet and the thing that looks like a gear sleeve all one solid piece?  Or, does the gear spin on the sleeve?

-steve


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 09, 2019, 01:39:55 AM
Hi Steve
The sleeve and ratchet spin together ,but the gear spins separately from them.
Greg


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: oc1 on September 09, 2019, 04:27:44 AM
Hi Steve
The sleeve and ratchet spin together ,but the gear spins separately from them.
Greg
So, when the star is tightened it would have to compress the sleeve/ratchet against the main gear somehow?  That's a real puzzle.
-steve


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 09, 2019, 12:32:24 PM
Hi Steve
The sleeve and ratchet spin together ,but the gear spins separately from them.
Greg
So, when the star is tightened it would have to compress the sleeve/ratchet against the main gear somehow?  That's a real puzzle.
-steve


Yes, that is correct and there is a lip that is part of the gear that has some type of hard washer sitting between the ratchet and the lip.
But I cannot see any pin that would enable taking these pieces apart.
Greg


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 09, 2019, 12:57:30 PM
I just noticed a slot in the top of the ratchet. Can't see how these parts come apart though.
Greg

(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/gear%20sleeve_zpsvbufzlzu.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/under%20sleeve_zpslyozoskv.jpg)


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: Crow on September 09, 2019, 01:09:54 PM
Looks like, maybe, a "keyway"....probably a pin, or some other sort of "key, further down on the sleeve. Try "working" the ratchet with a couple thin screwdivers ...knife blads...whatever will get between it, and the gear....one on each side,...with a little penetrating oil...it should loosen up, and start to move "up" the sleeve. The "drag" (friction)washer will be under it, and on top of the gear.....apparently, the spring and washer that was on top of the ratchet,is "transfering" the pressure from the star, to the "ratchet", which pushes the friction washer against the gear.


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 09, 2019, 01:46:05 PM
Thanks for your help Crow. I will see what I can do.
Greg


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: oc1 on September 09, 2019, 02:47:00 PM
Looks like, maybe, a "keyway"....probably a pin, or some other sort of "key, further down on the sleeve. Try "working" the ratchet with a couple thin screwdivers ...knife blads...whatever will get between it, and the gear....one on each side,...with a little penetrating oil...it should loosen up, and start to move "up" the sleeve. The "drag" (friction)washer will be under it, and on top of the gear.....apparently, the spring and washer that was on top of the ratchet,is "transfering" the pressure from the star, to the "ratchet", which pushes the friction washer against the gear.
Smart thinking.  That has to be it.  There is a sizable gap between ratchet and main gear.
-steve


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 09, 2019, 03:32:30 PM
You know guys, this little reel pulls about 5 lbs of drag, which is all it was probably designed to pull, so I am just going to replace the fibre washer and put the rest back, after a good clean, how it was originally.
I am not going to fish it, so it will remain in fairly good condition after a thorough lubrication.

Thanks guys for your help. I am learning all the time.
cheers
Greg


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 15, 2019, 05:57:01 PM
Just can't leave it alone. My curiosity has got the better of me.
So the ratchet is getting separated from the main gear.

(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/step%20one_zpsdrvn5aff.jpg)

The washer between the gear and ratchet is quite hard and is split near the pin on the sleeve.
I think the split in this drag washer is to enable getting it past the pin on the sleeve.

(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/step%202_zpscv07tydb.jpg)
(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/split%20washer_zpspafqmzhd.jpg)

There is also a drag washer under the main gear which also is very hard.

(https://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a601/george8322/drag%20washer%20under%20gear_zpskdtyxhxa.jpg)

Well, that is what the drag looks like.
cheers
Greg



Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: oc1 on September 15, 2019, 09:13:27 PM
So, what are you going to use to replace the washers?  Delrin would be smooth and last forever and nobody would ever have to do it again?  Carbon fiber would give you better stopping power?  I wonder what would be period appropriate?  Leather or felt?  When were "fiber" washers invented anyway and what were they made of?

-steve?


Title: Re: Graeme Takapart
Post by: basto on September 15, 2019, 11:17:48 PM
Hi Steve
Decisions, decisions. From what you said, delrin sounds very attractive, but I do have some 1mm carbontex. hmmmmmm
Greg