alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Penn Conflict 4000: Service Tutorial and First Look
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Author Topic: Penn Conflict 4000: Service Tutorial and First Look  (Read 65984 times)
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johndtuttle
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« on: March 25, 2014, 12:53:33 PM »

The new Penn Conflict is another in the established lineage of the Sargus and Battle in that it uses nearly the same body plan but refines it just a touch further with a couple of nice upgrades that up the ante a bit. I will admit what got me curious about this reel were some of the good reviews by fans of the Penn Battle finding it a great value and a smooth reel. Not everyone requires a Stella or Saltiga to land their near shore quarry and we'll see if this reel has something to offer that angler and we'll help him prep his reel.

When I do a Service Tutorial I concentrate on how to best service the reel for use in the Salt and as Penn considers this a "from shore" or "near shore" boat reel the possibility of salt intrusion should be in the forefront of our minds as we look at the new reel images and follow along. Of course, as a non-sealed, non-super spinner, this reel is not remotely waterproof and proper preparation and a little elbow + marine grease and anti-corrosion oil will be our allies to keep our little work horse in smooth running order.

In addition, when looking at a new reel we can only make some observations as to design intent as it is only after months on the water that the true reel is revealed. I will let the gentle reader put more mileage on the reel than I am able to right now and only hope to help him prepare his reel. Only time will tell if Penn has done their homework based on their experience with the Battle/Sargus and those reel's reputation for solid value. We will take a look at where the small additional cost was spent and then the individual can decide for himself if this modestly priced reel is likely to meet his needs.

Meet the Penn Conflict 4000:



Basic black with subtle graphics:



A rear view in the guest bedroom/reel repair cave Smiley



Rigged with a Zoom Super Fluke and ready to get wet for Bay Halibut, Fluke or Smallies:



Like pretty much any guy when a new reel is in your hands you give it a spin to see how it feels and if there is any suspect grinding or what have you. I made this little video as I was quite impressed with how free spinning it was ie "smooth" for a reel in this class:



So what does that mean for your fishing? Really only that the reel will be minimally fatiguing when fishing artificials all day and that the drivetrain is well supported which we would expect from an all metal body and sideplate. Energy turning the reel is effort saved and is more energy for that "one last cast" so it is not a completely trivial consideration over a day's fishing.

A close up of the line lay. Not perfect and very much "Battle-like" as they share the same main internals. This should not cause any trouble and small gaps like this with braid are the rule rather than the exception with reels in this class. It will be important to not overfill the spool and per Penn the dimensions of the Spool lip have been increased to further reduce the likelihood of wind knots:



Our schematic can be found here:

http://s7d5.scene7.com/is/content/purefishing/PENN/Manuals/CFT4000%20REV%201%201292952.pdf

Inevitably we start at the top as to disassemble the reel we have to remove the spool and start with the Drag Knob Assembly (52) giving us this image:



The Knob itself can be opened for cleaning and light oil as needed. Being an "assembly" the individual parts are not sold separately to my knowledge:





They should all be kept dry by the seal (on left above) but we can grease those parts and then button it back up:



The top of the drag stack is held in place by the Drag Retaining Ring (51) that is best removed carefully with a probe/pick. Every time you aren't careful and horse it out of there it goes "sproing" and flies into the nether. Ask me how I know this Sad.:



Below that we immediately find the first upgrade that Penn has incorporated in the Conflict and that is the "eared" or "keyed" drag washers:



These are of their "HT-100" material (woven carbon fiber) and extra thick. What the keying does is allow both surfaces of the drag to be used rather than just one making the stack a functionally "4 stack". This increases the drag range over the Battle by a few lbs per reel for the same size. The real gain is not so much that you will necessarily need the extra drag as much as you gain smoothness over the middle of the curve in most cases.



I found these lubed with Penn's general purpose reel grease. A contact at Penn had this to say about their use of a non-teflon grease for the drag washers:

"we’ve tested every grease imaginable, big names, small names, unheard of brands, etc. The PENN grease which is not Teflon based performs as well as anything we’ve tested when used with our HT-100 drag material. Since this is a proprietary lube to PENN and we package it ourselves in Philly, we use this grease everywhere we can."

The idea is always twofold: to reduce startup which makes the drag smoother and to prevent salt from getting in the washers which will promote corrosion and cause a sticky drag.

Under the spool is a simple arrangement that just needs a brush of grease or Corrosion-X to keep in good order. I do well grease the receptacle for the spool bearing confident that it's fine in the drag as well. For the Click Tongue (48) I use Corrosion-X rather than the factory grease as it attracts less sand:



The Main Shaft Assembly (41) supports a Thrust Washer (60) the Spool Ball Bearing (20D) retained by the Bearing Lock Spring (40) plus any teflon shims that you may have added to improve your line lay:





A note here about the Spool Bearing. All of the bearings in the reel now have rubber seals to increase waterproofness over standard shielded bearings, a small but nice touch. The rubber shields are easily removable with the tip of a hook (really, really easy) and the bearings can be completely packed with grease that way. If you are dealing with a lot of splashes or inadvertent dunks then packing them completely with marine bearing grease (ie Penn grease) will keep them free of corrosion. We'll find them in other places where they are nice to have.



However, to get deeper in the reel and to remove the Rotor (27) the Main Shaft has to be removed in a familiar order. We have to first remove it from the Crosswind Block (43) inside the Housing Assembly (1). This is accessed by removing the Housing Cover Assembly (45) via it's 3 Housing Cover Screws (46).



Don't forget the Rear Cover (226) and it's Screw (226A)



And this is where we find the Crosswind Block Screw (44) to allow removal of the Main Shaft:



A little closer look at the guts. The A) Main Gear (8.) made of Zinc Alloy per Penn, B) another sealed handle Bearing (20) with a small Shim (8A) underneath and not shown, C) the Crosswind Block (43). All was well greased from the Factory.



Close up of the Main Gear. Nothing fancy just cast Alu/Zinc alloy around a Stainless shaft well supported by bearings in the metal Housing and Cover:



A note on that Crosswind Block Screw: This is one of those spots where Blue Loctite might really be useful. It comes with it from the factory and so does not have to be cranked down and removes easily. Conversely, as this is one of those smaller phillips head screws if you went without you would really want to get it tight and then run the risk of stripping it. The whole idea is that you really are less concerned about corrosion rather than keeping it tight. If this one comes loose it could really cause havoc in there.



Once we can slide out the Main Shaft we find the Rotor Nut (38) retained by the Rotor Locking Plate (95B) which in turn is held by the Rotor Locking Plate Screw (38A). Underneath is the Rotor Nut Washer shown still in the Rotor (38D):





A note on this Rotor. In the 4000 and smaller sizes Penn has gone to Carbon Fiber. This was done to save a few ounces over the Battle and is more than tough enough for a reel this size. Per Penn their graphite blend has a  "...higher Glass content so that it’s more rigid than normal “Graphite” and can handle the stress that braided lines put on a rotor".

Under the Rotor we have the Housing and easy access to the Pinion and it's components. The Bearing Retainer (21) is removed via 3 Screws (21A). You can just see the black rubber seal on the Pinion Bearing (20) too:



The Pinion Assembly. From left to right the Clutch Washer (98W), pinion Bearing (20), Clutch/Sleeve Assembly (98C), Collar (21B), Upper Pinion Bearing (20A), and another Shim (8A) with the Pinion Gear (19) below them:



Penn grease is fine for all of these components. As needed the roller clutch can be degreased/cleaned with a plastic safe solvent to protect the springs and re-lubed. One thing I prefer is to use a light oil on the Main Shaft inside the Pinion Gear itself. Grease is a little sticky and the "smoothness" of the reel is improved when the Main Shaft slides freely inside the Pinion.

Once we have them all out we have this image of the bits in all their lightly greased glory:



When it goes back together we have to retrace our steps. First prepare the body to accept the Main shaft by moving the Crosswind Block to the very rear where it seats on a nub on the Crosswind Gear (231). At the top is the Crosswind Block Plate (43A) which is secure by it's Screw (43B). This Plate acts as a "race" or track to maintain the position of the Block:



This clears everything so that the Main Gear can be dropped in and readies us for the Shaft. The Pinion Assembly can be added before or after the Main Gear:



And is dropped into a well greased Housing:



Buttoned up well greased to protect the Pinion Assembly from inadvertent dunks:



Then the Rotor goes on.



We lube up the Main Shaft with light oil and then slide it in:



Which brings us back here:



After which we can button up the Housing with the left side Housing Cover (45) via it's 3 Screws (46). Here it is shown with the Bearing (20) in it's well greased receptacle:



Once the Cover is back on we can replace the Handle Assembly (15) with it's threads well greased:



We want the internals of the Housing and the Bearing well protected from Salt with grease, so we be sure to get some in the receptacle for the handle:



Now that the handle is back on we can give some gentle test cranks to see if everything is properly aligned. If there is any binding or roughness STOP!. You will have to backtrack and be sure the Crosswind Block is properly seated on the Crosswind Gear etc. it should be perfectly smooth like it was before you messed it up Cheesy.

We can now take a look at the Handle Assembly and it's Components. Here we find the last of the additional "niceties" that Penn has added to the Conflict in the the EVA grip:



It has a Handle Knob Cap (23A) that we remove by gripping the Knob with protection for the EVA:



And we find the Knob is well supported by more sealed Bearings (35B):





I greased the shaft and the bearings. The only make one turn per cycle of the handle and max protection seemed best.

From the outside the rest got a drop of Corrosion-X:



All we need to do now is finish up the Rotor bits. First we have the Bail Trip mechanism. I am going to let the photos speak for themselves here:









You just have to use a probe to poke them into their respective spots. Its a little painful Smiley.

The Line Roller:



From Right to Left, the Bail Stud Screw (36, note Loctite),  Roller Washer (132), Line Roller Washer (132A), Line Roller (35), Line Roller Bushing (35A) and another Washer (132A):



Note: Again this is an area where Blue Loctite may be preferred to keep everything tight. If you grease the Screw (36) then be sure to have a small screwdriver with you at all times. If Loctite, inspect for corrosion frequently. Sorry! That's just the way it is.

I think Penn has done the right thing here and used Teflon washers and bushings with a chrome plated hardened brass Line Roller. I bathed all of these in Corrosion-X but this is one area that gets more (from the outside) before every outing in the Salt. If you neglect your line roller it will seize on you regardless of the tech inside. This is one of the more "fool proof" ways to go if the reel is expected to have modest drag loads. You really only need bearings for your line roller when fishing for true big 'uns with a super spinner, imo.

Ok, that's it.

Now it's time for the Editorializing  Cheesy.

What have we seen and done? Penn has introduced a number of small upgrades to make an already good reel in the Battle just a little better:

1. They improved the drag high end and midrange smoothness.

2. They sealed all of the bearings in the reel. This is not "fail safe" waterproofness but does protect them longer before you get a chance to service them after a dunk and normal service intervals can be longer.

3. They went to Graphite rotors in the smallest sizes to save weight and startup inertia with no loss in performance.

4. EVA handle knobs with full bearing support.

5. And retained the full metal housing and side plate for best in class support of the Main Gear and Pinion.

Servicing the reel I would sum up as follows: Grease on the inside for durability, light Oil on the outside to prevent corrosion and attract less sand and salt. Don't neglect the pinion assembly, handle receptacle and spool bearing after a dunk. Be sure to use a corrosion resistant light oil on the Line Roller before every outing.



best regards



« Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 09:48:36 AM by johndtuttle » Logged
Ron Jones
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« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2014, 01:49:56 PM »

Great tutorial, I would like something other thatn just an AR, but otherwise looks like Penn really tried hard to make improvements and maintain a price point. I might look into a big one of these. How long do you think before someone uses thin CF sheet and washers to make this a drag monster?
Ron
« Last Edit: March 25, 2014, 01:51:05 PM by noyb72 » Logged

Ronald Jones
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handi2
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« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2014, 04:37:32 PM »

Excellent write up..! Penn is catching up to Shimano with these spinners..

The reel is basically a "Lightweight" Penn Battle without a line roller bearing. Mine came well greased inside and out from the factory. Something Penn should do with all of their models. After going thru all models of Penn reels the ones made in China are getting better than the USA models. I know....
« Last Edit: June 16, 2014, 04:11:47 PM by handi2 » Logged

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Ron Jones
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« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2014, 06:16:11 PM »

After your lube, I wonder if you have improved the time on your spin test?
Ron
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Ronald Jones
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johndtuttle
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« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2014, 07:32:21 PM »

After your lube, I wonder if you have improved the time on your spin test?
Ron

I never measured the time, but originally the lube on the main shaft was Penn Grease and the Corrosion-X freed it up noticeably to my hand. When something moves inside a long tube like that (ie inside the pinion) marine grease can be a little too sticky.

thx for the nice words
« Last Edit: March 27, 2014, 06:58:34 AM by johndtuttle » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2014, 05:12:44 AM »

I just purchased a couple 8000s and 2500s and you saved me the trouble of making a tutorial!  Grin

Nicely done
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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2014, 04:14:26 AM »

John,

Thank you for the tutorial. I agree with you. Smaller spinners only ned a bush in the line roller. Much leass problems. That reel is Pflueger through and through. I have played with one in my local shop and they look very nice
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« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2014, 07:31:46 AM »

John,

Thank you for the tutorial. I agree with you. Smaller spinners only need a bush in the line roller. Much less problems. That reel is Pflueger through and through. I have played with one in my local shop and they look very nice

Yea, there has been much discussion as to the original design of this series of reels however and per Penn this reel has a redesigned body from the original Battle. Regardless, at the end of the day they all stand on their own. Each of them has a few little different choices as to individual parts and materials and I hope that this "first look" lets guys see precisely what they get inside this reel in addition to the Penn standard of customer service to stand behind any issues should they occur.

If another of Pure Fishing's brands markets the same or very similar reel with other components and cosmetics then I hope those owner's find this tutorial useful.


regards
« Last Edit: April 08, 2014, 07:08:32 PM by johndtuttle » Logged
vasco venancio
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« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2015, 01:32:01 PM »

I there i wonder the lenght and width of the Penn conflict 4000 Knob shaft
I want to chance the Knob to a small size surecatch round Knob

(http://m.ebay.com/itm/Surecatch-Small-Size-Black-Color-Handle-Round-Knob-for-Daiwa-Spinning-Reels-/171896105384?nav=SEARCH) this round metal Knob is 46mm lenght and 28mm width
I think that is suitable in this model?!
I hope to get an answer from you soon
http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii261/haugusnord/P1020357_zps4c701928.jpg

Best regards
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STRIPER LOU
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« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2015, 02:21:44 PM »

Very nice tutorial JT. Easy to follow! Are the inner workings of the Battle the same or close to the conflict?
..................Lou
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handi2
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« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2015, 03:11:40 PM »

I there i wonder the lenght and width of the Penn conflict 4000 Knob shaft
I want to chance the Knob to a small size surecatch round Knob

(http://m.ebay.com/itm/Surecatch-Small-Size-Black-Color-Handle-Round-Knob-for-Daiwa-Spinning-Reels-/171896105384?nav=SEARCH) this round metal Knob is 46mm lenght and 28mm width
I think that is suitable in this model?!
I hope to get an answer from you soon
http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii261/haugusnord/P1020357_zps4c701928.jpg

Best regards


That knob shown on eBay requires drilling out and removing the original stem on the handle. It states the knob is for 2500 to 3000 sized reels so it would be a good size for your reel.
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« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2015, 03:21:14 PM »

Very nice tutorial JT. Easy to follow! Are the inner workings of the Battle the same or close to the conflict?
..................Lou

Very close. You can essentially use the same tutorial for a Battle 2. The Conflict simply uses a different handle and a different rotor material. the rest is cosmetics.
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johndtuttle
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« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2015, 03:24:02 PM »

I there i wonder the lenght and width of the Penn conflict 4000 Knob shaft
I want to chance the Knob to a small size surecatch round Knob

(http://m.ebay.com/itm/Surecatch-Small-Size-Black-Color-Handle-Round-Knob-for-Daiwa-Spinning-Reels-/171896105384?nav=SEARCH) this round metal Knob is 46mm lenght and 28mm width
I think that is suitable in this model?!
I hope to get an answer from you soon
http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii261/haugusnord/P1020357_zps4c701928.jpg

Best regards


Unfortunately no, as Handi2 has posted above. The critical dimensions are not exterior ones, but the internal dimensions to house the shaft and bushings/bearings. They are not the same as the knob you are curious about as I believe the Penn knob shaft is thicker.
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Live2Fish
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« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2016, 04:52:01 PM »

Awesome tutorial!  I was having problems cranking under any load, found some significant corrosion at the top of the pinion assembly.  Got it all cleaned up.  Over tightening the plate holding down the pinion assembly is too easy, making it difficult to crank also.   That's my only problem with this reel.  The drag is sweet on this thing. 
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johndtuttle
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« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2016, 05:27:12 PM »

Awesome tutorial!  I was having problems cranking under any load, found some significant corrosion at the top of the pinion assembly.  Got it all cleaned up.  Over tightening the plate holding down the pinion assembly is too easy, making it difficult to crank also.   That's my only problem with this reel.  The drag is sweet on this thing. 

Thanks  Wink.

Be sure to get plenty of grease over the top of the pinion assembly. Penn doesn't give you much sealing up there till you get to the Clash. I open up the seal of the top bearing now also and pack it with grease (very easy to do). It will last a very long time that way.



best
« Last Edit: March 25, 2016, 05:28:20 PM by johndtuttle » Logged
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