alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial PENN PICTURE TAIL PLATES
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Author Topic: PENN PICTURE TAIL PLATES  (Read 61642 times)
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Penn Chronology
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« on: December 18, 2014, 07:58:30 PM »

Finding all the Penn picture tail plates is not easy. There are so many. I will start this thread with the standard models and leave the big game models for another day or for anyone that feels they want to add them.

First, this is how is all began in 1934. The first tail plates made by Penn were flat, plain and mostly Black.



This is a tail plate for a 1934 Sea Hawk. In the beginning, all the Penn models were like this. Then in the late 1930's, Penn added a bit of flair to their reels.



This is a 1938 Sea Hawk. All of the plates I mention are on the models I found them on. That is not exclusive, the same pictures were used on other models at times.



This is one of the harder to find plates. This one is on a 1939 Anglesea model.



Here is a common scene found on a hard to find reel, the 1939 Bay Side. This scene is also used on many Long Beach models.



This is a 1939 Model 170. These #170 models are rare but this tail plate was later used on the common Beach Master Model 155



Penn made most of their reels in small 100 and 150 yard sizes and this was the picture plate that was used on the small models.



Here is a 1939 Sea Hawk. This picture I believe is exclusive to this model.



This the 1939 Silver Beach model 97. This is the parent reel of the later Model 99 Silver Beach.



I suspect there are many members familiar with this old Surfmaster model.



And the classic Squidder that kept its picture plate throughout its life span



And now we are growing and I will stop here. This is the large Long Beach model 66, 67 and 68 picture plate used on the first generation molds of these reels.

                  I am sure I missed some plates and I did not even touch on the Big Game reels that have their own picture plates. I hope there are some other to discover.

« Last Edit: October 06, 2017, 07:57:11 AM by Shark Hunter » Logged
Superhook
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« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2014, 12:38:09 AM »



1951 #249 Angler

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« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2014, 12:42:24 AM »

That 249 also goes back to the pre-war era.
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« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2014, 12:52:29 AM »




1940 Long Beach DeLuxe
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2014, 12:58:25 AM »



1939 #49 . Note waffle clicker

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« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2014, 01:04:34 AM »



 1949 #259 Live Bait Caster


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« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2014, 05:43:11 AM »

Great Photos Mike and Superhook! Grin
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« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2014, 08:48:31 AM »

               Oh yes, this is getting good. Now the next step to include in this historical picture study is to decide if each picture is a picture of a real location and what that location is. Obviously, some of the photos may be different angles of the same location but I suspect, Penn based their side plate art on real world locations.
               I believe that some of the Penn catalog cover surf fisherman photos were taken at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Some of the picture plates may be based on the same location, but that is a guess.



               
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« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2015, 07:17:12 PM »

I love the picture plates what models had them?
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« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2015, 09:43:31 PM »

Quote
I love the picture plates what models had them?

Pre WW II from about 1936 to 1942 I would say all Penn models had some kind of picture plate except for the lowest priced models like the Penn 14 and 15.
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« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2015, 10:08:09 PM »

I found this on ebay it has a real unusual handle. It looks like a very early wood know but the handle it self looks home made. What do you guys think.

Dustin

http://www.ebay.com/itm/181638524738?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
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« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2015, 11:16:08 PM »



The handle blade is an over-sized homemade aluminium piece with no safety screw hole. The biggest handle blade Penn made with a counterweight was on the 10/0-12/0 Senators .
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« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2015, 11:20:26 PM »

Quote
I love the picture plates what models had them?

Pre WW II from about 1936 to 1942 I would say all Penn models had some kind of picture plate except for the lowest priced models like the Penn 14 and 15.


   There are models other than senators that continued into the 50's with picture plates. The baymaster series 155, 160, 165, 180 & 190.....by the mid 50's all the baymasters went to a plain tail plate Sad.... I love those small reels.
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« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2015, 10:31:26 PM »

Quote
There are models other than senators that continued into the 50's with picture plates. The baymaster series 155, 160, 165, 180 & 190.....by the mid 50's all the baymasters went to a plain tail plate Sad.... I love those small reels.

Those were all very popular reels but you forgot the best one of the group by collectible standards:



               This ugly duckling of all the Light Tackle models is actually the only one that will bring hefty prices.



                The 170 is the model that is always at the bottom of the reel bucket and is passed by many collectors until it is pointed out.



                 The same picture plate as all the other models you mentioned.


                Dimensionally, the 170 was the same size as the Model 160 or 165. It was the Plain Jane of all the Light Tackle reels, the absolute most unpopular of the bunch in terms of a fishing tool and the one out of the group of Light Tackle Reels that is in the highest demand in today's collectible market because it was such a terrible seller that very few are around.

GO FIGURE???
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« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2015, 10:15:06 PM »

I wonder if this one will become a collector piece because the artist put the A in SENATOR back to front.
The upstroke is always the thin one.
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