bearings

Started by alantani, December 07, 2008, 04:27:21 PM

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Drisse

I've been cleaning and regreasing bearings following Alans steps since I joined this forum. Been using a couple of different waterresistant or marinegreases. Also tried with Cal's. Have tested to mix the grease with different oils to get the grease a bit lighter. But many times I think the bearings feels to sluggish after packing them with grease. After packing pinionbearing and driveshaft bearings the reel isn't that smooth and easy to crank. I can live with it, but others doesn't like it. Any advices or partytrix to avoid this ?

Gfish

You could try; cleaning oiling, then carefully covering the outside only with grease.
Fishing tackle is an art form and all fish caught on the right tackle are"Gfish"!

handi2

Quote from: Drisse on April 11, 2022, 02:13:52 PMI've been cleaning and regreasing bearings following Alans steps since I joined this forum. Been using a couple of different waterresistant or marinegreases. Also tried with Cal's. Have tested to mix the grease with different oils to get the grease a bit lighter. But many times I think the bearings feels to sluggish after packing them with grease. After packing pinionbearing and driveshaft bearings the reel isn't that smooth and easy to crank. I can live with it, but others doesn't like it. Any advices or partytrix to avoid this ?

Are you working spinning reels?
OCD Reel Service & Repair
Gulf Breeze, FL

foakes

Spinning reel bearing requirements are different from conventional reels.

The best result for me on spinners (or conventionals) has been to pop off the shields —- clean with lacquer thinner in a jar using the US cleaner —- rinse with water —- blow dry —- drop the bearing in a Pimento jar of WRL191S synthetic oil as I assemble the rest of the reel —- when ready to install the bearing/bearings, tamp dry the oil with a paper towel —- inject Cal's Purple Grease (it is thinner than the tan grease) into the bearing —- install it.

This recipe seems to hold up so far indefinitely —- and I have been doing this for 7 or 8 years.  The oil naturally mixes with the greased surfaces.

If Conventionals or very large Salt-Water spinners are being serviced —- I use Yamaha Marine in place of Cal's Purple.  Although Cal's purple is salt-resistant —- the heavier viscosity of Yamaha Marine seems to do a better job on the heavier salt reels.

Best, Fred
The Official, Un-Authorized Service and Restoration Center for quality vintage spinning reels.

D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

--------


"Enjoy the little things in Life — For someday, you may look back — and realize that they were the big things"

May your hands always be busy,
May your feet always be swift,
May you have a strong foundation,
When the winds of changes shift.
— "Forever Young," November, 1973, B. Dylan

Drisse

handi2, no only conventional reels.

Drisse

Thanks foakes. Will order Cal's purple the next time. Don't know what WRL191S is, but guess Google can help me. I don't have a bearingpacker. Do you fill the bearing, like if I handpack it, or only a light layer on the outside ?

handi2

Quote from: Drisse on April 12, 2022, 02:22:22 AMThanks foakes. Will order Cal's purple the next time. Don't know what WRL191S is, but guess Google can help me. I don't have a bearingpacker. Do you fill the bearing, like if I handpack it, or only a light layer on the outside ?

If you can remove the shields just pack it by hand
OCD Reel Service & Repair
Gulf Breeze, FL

foakes

#112
https://alantani.com/index.php?topic=27988.15

It is important when mixing grease with oil —- to not use any type of oil that contains any solvents. And a lot of all purpose or specialized oils do contain solvents.

WRL191S is used by many Major organizations such as the railroads, maritime operations, shipping companies, major corporations, the Navy.  This is the go-to oil lubricant for ships and oil platforms that have giant cranes used routinely in  challenging weather and salt conditions.

It was designed for lubricating steel cable that is used in rough weather or at sea.

The oil seeps in to cover the separate strands of steel cables so that they maintain their integrity, last longer, and are safer.

WRL191S stands for —- Wire Rope Lubricant —- and the "S" stands for the Salt-Water application it was designed for.

It mixes well with grease —- and stays in place on reel parts —- but is an easy cleanse and flush with solvents when servicing.

Best, Fred
The Official, Un-Authorized Service and Restoration Center for quality vintage spinning reels.

D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

--------


"Enjoy the little things in Life — For someday, you may look back — and realize that they were the big things"

May your hands always be busy,
May your feet always be swift,
May you have a strong foundation,
When the winds of changes shift.
— "Forever Young," November, 1973, B. Dylan

PacRat

#113
You guys really should try Fred's WRL191S. You don't need to purchase a whole gallon like Fred does. I purchase an aerosol can and a couple of the small pen oilers. A little bit goes a very long way and when your pen oilers are empty, you can refill them from the aerosol can. I find myself using this over almost all other oils and like Fred says, it blends well with grease. I still use 321 for conventional bearings but WRL191S almost exclusively in spinning reels. The WRL191S is also my new oil of choice for folding knives and rust prevention on carbon steel blades.

https://nationalhardware.com/blog/shop/lubricant/jaymors-191s-aerosol-can/

-Mike

Drisse

Will se if I can order it with shipping to Sweden.

dgoldstein78

Fred, Mike, do you use the WRL191S in the one-way bearings?
- Dan -

foakes

Yes, it works well for me on the one-way bearings, Dan —-

Nowadays, I don't do as many of those as I used to.  Trying to just work on 4 or 5 brands of vintage spinners —- and mostly the newer reels have one-way A/R bearings.

I guess I am just an old dog —- that likes old mechanical dogs!

On the traditional main bearings —- I dip them in WRL191S for a few minutes —- then apply grease such as Cal's purple or Yamaha Marine —- it mixes well.

Grease would likely foul up the operation of one-way A/R bearings.

Best, Fred
The Official, Un-Authorized Service and Restoration Center for quality vintage spinning reels.

D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

--------


"Enjoy the little things in Life — For someday, you may look back — and realize that they were the big things"

May your hands always be busy,
May your feet always be swift,
May you have a strong foundation,
When the winds of changes shift.
— "Forever Young," November, 1973, B. Dylan

dgoldstein78

Fred, thanks for that.

My experience with one-way bearings is in radio control model helicopters where a best practice was to use automotive transmission oil  in the bearing and I'd go the extra mile and use 1000-grit sandpaper to create a cross-hatch pattern on the sleeve to aid in better retention of the oil over the surface of that sleeve, instead of it pooling due to gravity/high-g manuevers.
- Dan -

Donnyboat

good point dan, make a lot of sence, cheers Don.
Don, or donnyboat

keithm87

Question on replacing bearings. I have a couple 130's I got used. I was working on them in the spring and replaced 2 bad bearings. At the time I happened on a deal on SS bearings that matched the ones Penn sells (new old stock on eBay for $12 each vs 35 from Penn) fast forward Now and I pulled everything apart after the season and found 1 bearing in a different spot that is in need of replacing. I can't find any NOS ones for reasonable, I can get 10 non-stainless of the same style for $15-20 or i could get sealed stainless for $8 each. Same specs, just sealed not shielded.

Will these work? I'd like to stock up and get 10-15 so I have them as needed as I'm bad with washing gear, after the 3hr drive home from the boat I crash out and sometimes don't get to rinsing gear for 2-3 days.