alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Painting Newell seats and bars.
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
December 15, 2019, 05:24:46 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Painting Newell seats and bars.  (Read 8754 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
jurelometer
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 439


« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2016, 11:30:44 PM »

Hey Sal,

Powder coated wood window frames is pretty swank stuff.

Just spent the evening reading up a bit on the newer powder coating techniques and coating wood and plastic.  It's  all your fault  Grin   

Some pretty amazing stuff out there now, but  mostly requiring a full-on factory setting.   I suspect that  if the market was large enough there would eventually be a way to do some of this stuff in a small shop environment- esp dye sublimation (sooo cool).    Powder coating of plastic parts is probably something that has to be done when the part is new to get a good finish.

I really want to see if there is a way to powder coat MDF in a small shop.   But the last thing I need is another project!

Getting back on topic- FWIW:  Personally, I would be nervous about any kind of painting of plastic reel parts.  Don't know how good it would look after a bit of use, and the function would be primarily cosmetic.   With aluminum parts there are some reasonable choices. 
Logged
oc1
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 2721



« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2016, 11:54:27 PM »

To get off topic again, I don't think there is any reason to be ashamed of honest cosmetic wear on fishing reels, boats or ford trucks.  It adds character.  Embrace it and your life will be easier.  Besides, a poor restoration usually looks worse than the original patina.

However, if it's for business and that's what the customer wants, then good on you for being market savvy and finding a better finish.

-steve
« Last Edit: June 06, 2016, 11:56:18 PM by oc1 » Logged
mike1010
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 519



« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2017, 09:35:11 AM »

What was the original finish that Newell used on aluminum seats and bars?  I'm guessing it was powder, because it looks too thick for anodizing, at least to my inexpert eyes.  Thanks.

Mike
Logged
reel man
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 262



« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2017, 01:23:14 PM »

The original aluminum parts were anodized then painted with a semi flat black finish that was baked on for a few minutes.  If the parts were hard anodized they were too shiny, and were too dull with stage 1 process.

I've found Krylon semi flat black does a very nice job bringing the finish back to original.  With no baking needed.
Logged
mike1010
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 519



« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2017, 01:26:25 PM »

Thanks, RM.
Logged
plankton
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4


Adelaide, South Australia


« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2019, 03:41:38 AM »

The original aluminum parts were anodized then painted with a semi flat black finish that was baked on for a few minutes.  If the parts were hard anodized they were too shiny, and were too dull with stage 1 process.

I've found Krylon semi flat black does a very nice job bringing the finish back to original.  With no baking needed.

Hey guys, perhaps you've seen my other thread about the 220-F Blackie I'm cleaning up. I'm thinking of painting the seat and bars to give them some better protection and a nicer look.

It doesn't seem like we have Krylon paint over here. Would something like this work?

https://www.bunnings.com.au/dulux-metalshield-300g-satin-black-epoxy-enamel-spray-paint_p1400829

I'd prefer something that doesn't need heating. Is there any way to tell if a paint won't need heating, or how can I tell once I've painted the parts whether they would benefit from some heat?

Thanks.



* 20190810_083416.jpg (1308.88 KB, 2240x1594 - viewed 11 times.)

* 20190810_155919.jpg (808.59 KB, 1464x1046 - viewed 11 times.)
Logged
ez2cdave
Sensei
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1251



« Reply #21 on: August 13, 2019, 09:49:02 AM »

I was just going to recommend an Epoxy paint, but you have already gone in that direction.

Getting all the old finish off and surface preparation, before painting, should be addressed.

Tight Lines !
Logged
oc1
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 2721



« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2019, 11:18:23 AM »

If you paint an old reel, it will look like an old reel that someone painted.  It has a nice experienced look to it now.
-steve
Logged
George6308
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 349


« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2019, 02:06:17 PM »

I have painted several Penn Spinfisher reels with Brownel's Aluma-Hyde. It holds up well in salt water. It is available in flat and semi-gloss black. If should work on Newell parts. It is designed to refinish anodized firearm receivers.
This 710 Greenie was refinished in flat black. The 710Z was done in semi-gloss black.


* image.jpeg (1362.84 KB, 2592x1936 - viewed 10 times.)

* image.jpeg (1238.56 KB, 2592x1936 - viewed 9 times.)
« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 02:12:36 PM by George6308 » Logged
FishNinJay
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2019, 03:09:47 PM »

on a related side-topic.. what about the raised letters and numbers?

Any suggestions on a shiny silver/chrome paint to touch-up the numbers? And likewise, to fill-in the recessed black around it?
Not a huge issue.. just thought of it now while reading this thread.

Thanks..


* 6695A79B-2588-4918-80B7-E81DA03E9E46.jpeg (2015.39 KB, 4032x3024 - viewed 11 times.)
« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 03:15:20 PM by FishNinJay » Logged
Swami805
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 2716


« Reply #25 on: August 13, 2019, 04:56:09 PM »

Those badges will pop out from the side plate. Use black spray paint and let it dry. Stretch some fabric on something flat and put some solvent like lacquer thinner on it and rub the paint off the raised lettering, it won't take off the silver. I used some generic rattle can paint from the big box store. Learned this from Jerry(reelman). Works like a charm. Add a little glue to hold the badge back in, I used some silicone seal so I could get them out again if I wanted. You'll see 2 little "pins" sticking out of the inside the sideplate, push those pins and the badge should pop out.
Logged
ez2cdave
Sensei
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1251



« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2019, 07:44:54 AM »

It has a nice experienced look to it now.

-steve

Steve,

At least you didn't use the word "patina" . . . LOL !

Tight Lines !

Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.363 seconds with 18 queries.