alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Sea Ford Restoration
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Author Topic: Sea Ford Restoration  (Read 22107 times)
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sdlehr
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« on: March 21, 2016, 07:49:46 PM »

Since I got the ORCA Restoration book for Christmas I've been itching to find a project reel and try out some of the techniques I've read about. I found a Penn Sea Ford in pretty rough shape on the big auction site. The head plate bushing had broken out and it was pretty much trashed....



To make it an even uglier prospect, the former owner (I presume), the late John J Bradley, formerly of Washington St., Peekskill, NY, etched his name and address in the head and tail plates. Just to make sure no one stole his reel he put his name on it multiple times...



The surface damage to the side plates would come off with wet sanding; but that head plate with the messed up bushing was going to be a challenge... here's a closer view of the damage.... it also gives another perspective of the surface of the pinion that faces the bushing....



Here  was my plan: I would attempt to rebuild the broken side plate with 5-minute epoxy. I had to think ahead to the final product; the bushing had to be as close to perpendicular to the head plate as possible for reasonable free spool; it isn't likely I'll use the reel, but it would be nice for it to be fully functional as it sits on the shelf. I don't have a great picture of this part, but the part of the head plate that was remaining that would be in direct contact with the bushing retainer was only about 45 degrees around the retainer itself. I found the sweet spot with respect to free spool and placed a drop of super glue on the bushing retainer and it ran down into the area to affix the retainer to the head plate. I held onto the whole thing for a minute or two and let the super glue dry. Step one complete! If you look closely you can see the dried super glue in the next two photos.





For the next several steps I would build up the area around the bushing retainer with 5-minute epoxy. I used the product from Gorilla Glue. I'm sure all 5-minute epoxies will work the same. I learned in the O.R.C.A. book that the addition of bakelite filings to the epoxy would color the epoxy the same color as the side plate. I had picked up a Penn 49 a few months ago, and like almost all the 49's around the plates had swelled and the trim rings cracked. I filed the plates down and installed new trim rings months ago and saved the filings just for this occasion... I was to apply the epoxy in stages and build up the broken side plate. The first stage was just straight epoxy without any filings added.



I took care to pay attention to both sides of my project



When the 5-minute epoxy is first mixed it is pretty fluidy, but it starts to set up pretty quickly. Before it set up I kept moving and tumbling the side plate so that the epoxy would not sag in any one direction. I only had to do that for a minute or so; it sets up pretty quickly.

I ended up adding epoxy in 3 applications on 3 successive evenings. Each event was more preparation than it was actually applying the epoxy and letting it set up. The key was to build up the side plate structure gradually in phases. I added bakelite filing to the second and third applications of epoxy. Here is another view after the first application



The second application really built up a lot of the structure of the new sideplate. This was what it looked like when I left it at the end of the second night.



I forgot to add that I swabbed the surfaces of the bakelite and epoxy with 91% IPA prior to each new epoxy application. It turns out that I didn't add enough filings to the epoxy on the second application; I found out on the third that it takes a lot of filings to really color the epoxy well. This was the end of the the third and final epoxy/filing application; and it sat overnight once again.



Tonight I came home and finished the project; I filed down the built-up area flat to match the original build;



I then took care of the names and addresses etched with great care into multiple places by wet sanding, starting with 320 grit and working my way up to 2000 grit. I have to say that I'm quite pleased with how this turned out, and quite amazed at how easy this really was; the key was to be patient and build up the structure slowly. It didn't come with a handle. I'm in the market, but don't really know which style handle I should put on it... if you have an opinion I'm all ears..... here's a few final shots of the finished product....

















I really enjoyed this project; I tested myself, I did something I had never done before, it turned out really well, and I saved an old Seaford from the trash heap!!! Now, who has a handle for this lady???


Sid
« Last Edit: November 25, 2017, 03:58:52 AM by sdlehr » Logged

Sid Lehr
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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2016, 08:00:12 PM »

Looks great!
You have to look real close to see any repair. I wouldn't notice if you hadn't told me. What is the plan for the spool?
Ron
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cbar45
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2016, 08:10:14 PM »

Spectacular job Sid!

Thanks for the tip on using bakelite filings to color the epoxy.

I would have gone the easy route and used marbling pigment, that is if they made something that matches..Wink

Chad

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sdlehr
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2016, 08:10:25 PM »

What is the plan for the spool?
Ron
What would you suggest?

Sid
« Last Edit: March 21, 2016, 08:28:46 PM by sdlehr » Logged

Sid Lehr
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2016, 08:10:50 PM »

Great save Sid . Smiley

 It is a 1936-38 model so you should have the handle with the hard rubber type knob that imitates the early wooden hour glass style.
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sdlehr
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2016, 08:11:50 PM »

Oh, and I forgot to add - over 20 seconds free spool!!!!!!!

Sid
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Sid Lehr
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2016, 08:17:35 PM »

Great save Sid . Smiley

 It is a 1936-38 model so you should have the handle with the hard rubber type knob that imitates the early wooden hour glass style.
That's the information I was looking for! Thanks! Still don't have a handle, but I know which one I need now....

The Seaford was made from 1935 to 1940. What makes this one a 1936-38 model?

Sid
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2016, 08:24:37 PM »

Sid, If I understand correctly, the bushing retainer was entirely loose from the side-plate and re-set using the superglue?

I have an Ocean City (Bay City) with a chipped handle boss that may be a candidate for the type of repair you showed.

Chad
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Tightlines666
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2016, 08:30:06 PM »

Excellent job Sid!  I am throughly impressed.  The logo, stand, and waffle clicker help to age it.  Don't have the book in front of me at the moment to give you the specifics.  I don't think I have the handle you need, but someone must.  May require a donor reel.
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sdlehr
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2016, 08:31:45 PM »

Sid, If I understand correctly, the bushing retainer was entirely loose from the side-plate and re-set using the superglue?

I have an Ocean City (Bay City) with a chipped handle boss that may be a candidate for the type of repair you showed.

Chad
That's right, Chad... I lined it up best I could to get decent free spool, then held it in place as the super glue set.... clearly that was the make-or-break step of the whole project. I lucked out.


Sid
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« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2016, 09:00:33 PM »

Sid,

Yardage on foot started in 36.

Plain Tail pates on most models went to graphics late 38-39 .

If i'm wrong Mike will correct the info .
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alantani
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« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2016, 09:06:00 PM »

ok, now THAT is pretty impressive!!!!!!!  Grin
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« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2016, 09:32:11 PM »

Hey Doc--

Are you sure your not a Dentist -- instead of a Veterinarian?

That is some pretty artistic filling.

WOW!

I have a Seaford or two -- I will check the loose handles against it -- to see if one is correct.

Best,

Fred
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sdlehr
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« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2016, 09:56:15 PM »

Hey Doc--

Are you sure your not a Dentist -- instead of a Veterinarian?

That is some pretty artistic filling.

WOW!

I have a Seaford or two -- I will check the loose handles against it -- to see if one is correct.

Best,

Fred
Thanks, Fred. Veterinary dentistry is my forte. I have a jaw surgery scheduled for tomorrow (I'm the surgeon, not the patient!) I thought several times how similar this project was to working with dental materials. In fact, I used a dental pick to shape the epoxy on the first application. I would very much appreciate the opportunity to purchase a handle for this reel if it happens that you have the proper one...

Thanks.
Sid
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« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2016, 10:07:44 PM »

in japanese, sensei means teacher.  it is truly one of the most revered professions in all of japan.  i have created this new member group and i've given it three stars.  yeah, yeah, i know, that and a dollar and you can ride the bus.  but sid lehr and his epoxy side plate post have earned him the first spot.  i wanted to create this group to recognize members of the website that have made significant contributions that show ingenuity, using the resources that are available at hand, thinking out of the box, finding a new solution to an old problem.  i've asked the moderators to keep an eye out for contributions made in this spirit.  again, thank you, sid, a very nice post!  Grin
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