alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial D.A.M. Quick 265 Microlite
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
August 23, 2019, 03:40:12 PM *
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Author Topic: D.A.M. Quick 265 Microlite  (Read 6545 times)
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festus
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« Reply #45 on: March 17, 2019, 03:28:48 PM »

We need to recall — that after the last War — They brought out the SW68, 250, 260, 228, 238, 248, 240, 245, 280, 285, 270, 275.  Few of these had much basic numerical model continuity.  It was all over the board.

Best,

Fred
With the help of this Alan Tani site with Fred's expertise, we can identify these numbers and get an idea of line capacity, size, weight, etc of these D-A-M Quicks even though they have numerical model confusion.  Also Roland Lindenbergh's site is a tremendous help.  https://home.kpn.nl/roland.lindenberh/index.html

Can't say the same for many other brands.  I see many reels out there on the net for sale I'd buy, but either the seller fails to give any information on said line capacity, size, or weight, or fails to post a good photo with a ruler or something for size comparison.  Examples are Heddons, Compacs, Japanese Pfluegers and Japanese Shakespeares, South Bend, Olympic, and a few more.  A knowledgeable seller will provide more info.

Perhaps there is a chart out there on reel size comparison I'm not aware of?

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nagant
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« Reply #46 on: March 17, 2019, 06:30:42 PM »

really enjoy this forum, everyone is so helpful! i found this link here www.saschas-sammler-homepage but it's in German. just search it and i get google translate option on link. works good and nice site.
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Brice
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Smack dab in the middle of USA - Eastern Nebraska


« Reply #47 on: March 18, 2019, 12:05:03 PM »


Can't say the same for many other brands.  I see many reels out there on the net for sale I'd buy, but either the seller fails to give any information on said line capacity, size, or weight, or fails to post a good photo with a ruler or something for size comparison.  Examples are Heddons, Compacs, Japanese Pfluegers and Japanese Shakespeares, South Bend, Olympic, and a few more.  A knowledgeable seller will provide more info.

Perhaps there is a chart out there on reel size comparison I'm not aware of?


Most eBay sellers don't have a clue about the reels they're selling, let alone the wt or line specs. Sometimes you can find an old dealers catalog online like those Heddons, or maybe even a manual. Advertisements and magazine reviews are also a good way to uncover hard to find info, especially if you have an idea when they were first offered to the public.

Also, paid membership to ORCA gains you free unlimited access to the Research Library.  The knowledge, information and camaraderie obtained there is well worth the minuscule membership fee.     
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

Tommy D (ORCA), NE



Favorite Activity? ............... In our boat fishing
RELAXING w/ MY BEST FRIEND (My wife Bonnie)
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« Reply #48 on: May 06, 2019, 05:30:40 AM »

I don't have anything to add about the 265, but as long as some are sharing their draft stories I thought I tell mine.

My number came up 167. I was getting a college deferment at the time, and they let me finish in May 1971. The draft law had expired by then, so I had a reprieve while Congress debated on what to do about it, before finally re-instating it. I received my notice in November, and went in to the recruiting office to investigate my options. They gave me an "intelligence" test (note the quotes), then told me I qualified for whatever job I wanted if I enlisted for three years. Or, I could accept the draft, serve but two years, but I would go wherever they sent me.

I looked at the list of jobs, and none of them appealed to me. It wasn't until after I told the recruiter that I'd take my chances with the draft that he told me that because of my electrical engineering degree I'd likely get a Science and Engineering assignment, never seeing combat. And that's what happened.

I served with the Walter Reed Institute of Research in Washington D.C. Just a 1-hour flight from home. We were studying the effects of low-level microwave exposure. At the time, the Soviet standard for maximum exposure was 100 times less than the US standard, but the Soviets were beaming low-level microwaves at the US embassy in Moscow. We were trying to find out what they knew that we didn't.

I ran a minicomputer for them, a machine the size of a refrigerator that had considerably less computing power than the phones we give children these days. We never did find anything, at least not in the two years I was there. My personal speculation, with no evidence to back it up, is that the Soviets were trying to make us waste time and money looking for something that wasn't there. The same kind of manipulation the Russians employed during the 2016 election.

In the end. my time in the service paid off. Because I served during a qualifying conflict, I get a 15% break on the property taxes on my house. That's very helpful. Those two years were less than 3% of my life so far, so if you ask me it was a bargain. If only people would stop thanking me for my "heroism" just for putting on the uniform, I'd feel a lot more comfortable.

Sorry to hijack the thread. I return it to you now.
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