alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial D.A.M. Quick 265 Microlite
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
April 26, 2019, 05:52:30 AM *
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Author Topic: D.A.M. Quick 265 Microlite  (Read 5522 times)
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Cubby1973
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« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2019, 07:49:19 PM »

I cleaned and lubed it a couple weeks ago, so it was either never there to begin with or was lost in the clean up. It's a learning process to know what to look for. Now I know for the next time. These are fun and not to bad to work on, I love it! Will be on the look out for more. Have one 265 and two 110's now.

Thanks
Jeff
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foakes
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« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2019, 09:10:49 PM »

Here is what the tiny steel roller looks like —

Think of the German engineering and thought that went into just this tiny aspect of the spool oscillation function...

We have a machined spiral worm pattern on the bottom end of the steel worm pinion gear — which in turn drives a brass worm gear — that then operates the spool oscillation slide.  

The engineers could have just left it at that — 99% of the manufacturers do — and it works just fine.

Instead, the engineers took it a step further by using this steel roller to reduce friction and wear even more.

The more you really study these D.A.M. Quick reels — the more you will understand and appreciate the craft, skill, and engineering that was not just added on when needed — it was built in from the start.

These reels, with their tight tolerances where needed — and loose flexibility when useful — will still work perfectly 100 years from now — if just basically serviced and maintained.

If these Microlites were manufactured today — they would likely be a top seller, and retail for between $200 to $300, IMO.

Just simple, overbuilt, and functional.

Best,

Fred



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« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 09:12:35 PM by foakes » Logged

A young apprentice once asked a Master Carpenter — “what was the most expensive tool you ever purchased, old timer?”

The older man just replied matter of factly —

“The one that didn’t work”...
Cubby1973
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« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2019, 06:49:43 PM »

Check around in the grease, or inside the casing — loose.

If you cannot find it — I will send you one at N/C.

Best,

Fred

I thought I found the roller Fred, but it was to different reel I had parted out. I sure do appreciate your generosity!

Thanks
Jeff
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foakes
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« Reply #33 on: January 16, 2019, 08:34:44 PM »

Dropped it in the mail this morning at the Post Office.

Best,

Fred
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A young apprentice once asked a Master Carpenter — “what was the most expensive tool you ever purchased, old timer?”

The older man just replied matter of factly —

“The one that didn’t work”...
handyandy
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« Reply #34 on: January 31, 2019, 07:13:54 AM »

That is a darn good looking microlite. I have a 1202 that I got cheap a while back because half the original paint has corroded off. I may go through it make some cf drags and strip the rest of the paint like you did to this microlite. May give it to my dad for fathers day since he has moved down to fort meyers FL area now should be a perfect size to use for general fishing of snook, reds, specks, or whatever else he may find on the end of his line down there. Thanks for the inspiration on the bare aluminum finish, I think a light coat of car wax once in a while would really help seal it and prevent corrosion in harsher environments.
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Frank
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« Reply #35 on: March 17, 2019, 04:58:06 AM »

Hi Fred,

What is the smallest of the Quick spinners. The Microlite, 110 and 110N have me confused as far as size goes.

Thanks,

Frank
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Cubby1973
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« Reply #36 on: March 17, 2019, 05:50:44 AM »

I'll try till Fred comes along. The Quic Microlite is the smallest. When it comes to the 110 and 110N the spools are similar in size, but ARE NOT INTERCHANGABLE! Sorry for the all caps, but it's a reminder of a headache you don't want. The body of the 110N is a little longer and the rotor is also a little taller. Hope this helps. I'm kinda new to these myself,but have learned an enormous amount from this site and tinkering with them myself.

Thanks
Jeff
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« Reply #37 on: March 17, 2019, 07:42:51 AM »

Great Jeff, thank you. Just what I needed to know.

Frank
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foakes
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« Reply #38 on: March 17, 2019, 08:03:32 AM »

Yes, Jeff is exactly right...

265 Microlite is the smallest.

110 is next smallest.

110N is the largest of the Microlites.

Here is a photo also of a true Microlite — a Daiwa 500C — also one of my personal favorites.

I have a personal arsenal of about 100 small spinning reels — many are Microlite size.

Best,

Fred


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« Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 08:06:45 AM by foakes » Logged

A young apprentice once asked a Master Carpenter — “what was the most expensive tool you ever purchased, old timer?”

The older man just replied matter of factly —

“The one that didn’t work”...
Frank
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« Reply #39 on: March 17, 2019, 08:24:09 AM »

Thank you, Fred. Pictures too! I wonder why they came up with a 265 as a model number.
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foakes
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« Reply #40 on: March 17, 2019, 09:21:57 AM »

Thank you, Fred. Pictures too! I wonder why they came up with a 265 as a model number.

My theory is marketing more than any sort of numerical meaning...

We need to remember, while D.A.M. Quick had already been in the fishing tackle business in Europe primarily — since the late 1800’s — they had also been through (2) World Wars — the last of which destroyed their manufacturing plant.

As the Allies and the new Germany without the Nazi War Machine — undertook the task of rebuilding the country — businesses still needed to attempt to manufacture products, turn a profit, pay their employees, do capital rebuilding or relocation expenditures, develop new products, R & D, and so much more.

The last thing on their minds — was keeping an orderly and meaningful numerical sequence in place so that we would understand it decades later as we look at our reels.

It was just survival — coupled with turmoil and government export regulations.  They were just trying to make something work.

We need to recall — that after the last War — They brought out the SW68, 250, 260, 228, 238, 248, 240, 245, 280, 285, 270, 275.  Few of these had much basic numerical model continuity.  It was all over the board.

I think the 265 just fit the marketing target when introduced in 1960.  It was considered one of the highest quality Microlite reels of its day.  It was actually a tiny scaled down version of the massive and capable DQ Super 270.  Same engineering — same materials — smaller components to fit a tiny frame.

The next series was orderly, as were all other series up until the time they moved to Asia in the early 90’s or late 80’s.

Even the company was confused as various distributors in different geographical locations, worldwide, promoted their DAM products.

To prove this, I have a boxed 265 Microlite, with full paperwork and accessories.  The box reads Microlite, the model # reads 110 on the box — but pictured is a 265 Microlite.  The owners manual reads “110” formerly the 265 Microlite.  And the manual is very complete and humorous — and is put out and distributed by Gladding Corporation!  All illustrations are of a 265.

Sometimes, if we look and study lots of information — it will still not fit into our idea of proper order.

Sometimes it is just scrambling and disorder that creates order eventually.

Just my opinions...

Best,

Fred
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A young apprentice once asked a Master Carpenter — “what was the most expensive tool you ever purchased, old timer?”

The older man just replied matter of factly —

“The one that didn’t work”...
Frank
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« Reply #41 on: March 17, 2019, 10:48:24 AM »

WOW Fred!!! Thank you for taking all that time to supply me with the answer. Great info there. You really know your stuff.

Best,

Frank
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foakes
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« Reply #42 on: March 17, 2019, 11:27:51 AM »

This is a really unique owners manual —

Distributed by South Bend Tackle Company, a Division of Gladding Corporation in New York.

Best, Fred


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« Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 11:33:37 AM by foakes » Logged

A young apprentice once asked a Master Carpenter — “what was the most expensive tool you ever purchased, old timer?”

The older man just replied matter of factly —

“The one that didn’t work”...
Cubby1973
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Reel and camera collector!


« Reply #43 on: March 17, 2019, 11:34:56 AM »

Great! Now I want to make a little microlite reel guy! Lol!😂
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Frank
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« Reply #44 on: March 17, 2019, 01:07:59 PM »

Now, that's mint condition!
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Frank. Retired. Life long fishing and boating fanatic.
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