alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial First time Building a 10ft stand up shark rod- Need Help...
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
July 19, 2019, 08:28:27 AM *
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Author Topic: First time Building a 10ft stand up shark rod- Need Help...  (Read 1911 times)
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droppedit
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« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2017, 11:01:45 AM »

The questions I have are 1: is this a one piece thru the handle using a gimbal? 2: is it a unibutt? 3: What blank are you using? If you have a 9' 0r 10' blank, using a unibutt then the amount of guides and spacing depend on the trim. Lots of ways to go here. Bottom line is you will be the one using it and a lot of great rods come from modifications of the not so great. Good luck to you and post pictures when you have it done and be sure to post the 1st shark!

Dave
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« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2018, 11:18:31 AM »

It is a through the grip setup. Gatorglass CRB 10ft shark rod 80-130ib class. gimbal on bottom. It will be acid wrapped. Is spine-ing necessary on an acid wrapped rod?
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droppedit
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« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2018, 12:57:26 PM »

Is spine-ing necessary on an acid wrapped rod?

Always spine the rod. Depending on the application and what you want the rod to do is determines the position of the spine. Conventional wrap I always put on top. Now there is a debate on this. If the rod is used for distance casting then the spine may be put on the underside as it will load the cast with more power. Same with a fly rod or spinning. With those 90% of the time is casting, more if you have the luck I do, and the guides are on the bottom so the torque problem is eliminated.
Acid wrap is your call but with the spine on the top and if you get into the fish of the lifetime you'll be glad it's there. Be glad to hear what others say on this.


Dave
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ez2cdave
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« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2019, 08:50:55 AM »

A little more info on "long" shark rods . . .

Tight Lines !


* 003.JPG (233.88 KB, 1023x1014 - viewed 12 times.)

* HARNELL 553 - 1.jpg (59.57 KB, 1000x750 - viewed 19 times.)

* rods-3.JPG (93.84 KB, 976x624 - viewed 18 times.)

* SPECS.jpg (81.37 KB, 581x799 - viewed 11 times.)
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CapeFish
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« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2019, 10:17:19 AM »

I really feel pain when I watch you guys with those rods between legs, can't I send some rod buckets over?  Huh?
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steelfish
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« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2019, 11:43:48 AM »

My Question wasnt what to fish with but how many guides i should put.  .... How many guides should i have on a 10ft rod?

hey amigo, if you read more carefully two good friends already answered your question some post the question for a second time.
check them bellow.




The trick is going to be getting the rod pulled over to some sort of fighting curve when determining your guide spacing.
Hope that helps.
Cheers from sunny Africa.

Don't know what blank you're using so do a static test for guide placement.


as you noticed already this rod builder professional didnt gave you an "spacing formula", the Key is to dont follow any "spacing formula" for your blank, if you find a spacing formula for your blank take it as a recommendation, but if you really want to build your rod correctly you need to do an static test to find where the guides should be installed.


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Cor
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« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2019, 08:37:38 PM »

Is spine-ing necessary on an acid wrapped rod?

Always spine the rod. Depending on the application and what you want the rod to do is determines the position of the spine. Conventional wrap I always put on top. Now there is a debate on this. If the rod is used for distance casting then the spine may be put on the underside as it will load the cast with more power. Same with a fly rod or spinning. With those 90% of the time is casting, more if you have the luck I do, and the guides are on the bottom so the torque problem is eliminated.
Acid wrap is your call but with the spine on the top and if you get into the fish of the lifetime you'll be glad it's there. Be glad to hear what others say on this.


Dave

First time I've seen someone use the spine in the same way I do.
As casting is very important in my game and also using a strong rod I tend to play around with the spine depending on the strength of the blank.

If I feel the rod is too strong for me to load properly i'll put the strong side at the top or visa versa. 

I nearly always tape my guides and reel to a blank and go cast with it and then also test the line along the rod curve under load.   Sometimes this takes the longest time spent on building a rod as I in that process also sometimes decide to lengthen or shorten the blank a bit.

I use conventional reels only.
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Cornelis
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« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2019, 10:49:57 PM »

If you don't identify where the spine of a blank is, you have 359 chances of getting it wrong, as opposed to only 1 chance of getting it right. Even with 'acid wrapped' options, the spine needs to be in the right place to make it work properly.

A while back we were building casting rods for shark with acid wrapped guides, and found that the spine orientation was crucial, especially once the sharks were hooked up.

Cheers from sunny Africa
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oc1
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« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2019, 11:35:51 PM »

I agree with Alex and the static test.  Bend the rod as though there is a fish on and adjust the guide placement to prevent line rubbing on the blank.

For a shark rod you'll need the fork of a tree or a really heavy piece of furniture to bend the rod and tie it off from the tip while you monkey around with the guide placement.

Look at the pictures above with the guys about to be drug through the sand on their behinds.  There is very little bend in their Harnell rods.  This seems to be pretty typical of shore-based shark rods.  

Personally, I think those guys would be more comfortable and they could put more pressure on the fish using slightly lighter rods.  The height of the rod tip and line above the water and the sand bar decreases (gets lower) as the rod bends and that's a disadvantage.  But the length of the fulcrum they are pulling against is effectively shortened too.  With a light enough rod or with a short enough rod they might even stand up and fight.  When they stand up they will get back the loss of effective height of the line above the water and sand bar.

The photos of stiff rods with little bend also show that they do not need so many roller guides on a rod with very little bend under the extreme load.

-steve
« Last Edit: April 16, 2019, 11:36:50 PM by oc1 » Logged
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« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2019, 08:46:01 AM »

I agree with Alex and the static test.  Bend the rod as though there is a fish on and adjust the guide placement to prevent line rubbing on the blank.

For a shark rod you'll need the fork of a tree or a really heavy piece of furniture to bend the rod and tie it off from the tip while you monkey around with the guide placement.

Look at the pictures above with the guys about to be drug through the sand on their behinds.  There is very little bend in their Harnell rods.  This seems to be pretty typical of shore-based shark rods.  

Personally, I think those guys would be more comfortable and they could put more pressure on the fish using slightly lighter rods.  The height of the rod tip and line above the water and the sand bar decreases (gets lower) as the rod bends and that's a disadvantage.  But the length of the fulcrum they are pulling against is effectively shortened too.  With a light enough rod or with a short enough rod they might even stand up and fight.  When they stand up they will get back the loss of effective height of the line above the water and sand bar.

The photos of stiff rods with little bend also show that they do not need so many roller guides on a rod with very little bend under the extreme load.

-steve

Agree on all of this. Just an extra note: spacing changes with different length rods depending on how they are made. Fast, Moderate Fast, Moderate, etc. The spacing needs to keep the line off the blank. I just built a Rainshadow 50 class Stub rod on a curved butt. Only has two Alps roller guides and roller tip. Perfect for this rod. On a 9' spinner I may use 8 guides. On the same blank conventional it may have 12 guides.

Dwight
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