alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial 3D Printers
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
August 12, 2020, 10:41:04 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 3D Printers  (Read 1384 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Frank
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 448


« on: September 29, 2018, 08:40:14 AM »

I don't no much about these machines but I was wondering if anyone has ever attempted to copy reel sideplates with one?
Logged

Frank. Retired. Life long fishing and boating fanatic.
jurelometer
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 652


« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2018, 10:57:49 AM »

The typical hobby Fused Deposit Modeling 3D printers (these are the ones that feed melted filament through an extruder) have a couple of issues for reel parts.

The best way to describe these machines is  to think of them as a computer controlled cross between a coil fed welder and and injection molding machine.   Special software takes a 3D image and builds a series of 2D cross sections (slices).  The extruder on the printer squirts out threads of melted plastic under light pressure to match the slice.   The  extruder moves up one step and repeats the process for the next slice,  welding the current layer to the previous one.

The welds are are the weakness.   With the right type of plastic,  these printers can make parts that are remarkably strong except on the layered axis.  Layer seperation is the issue.  And due to variations in part size and shape, changes in external temperature, filament diameter, etc.,  inter-layer strength is highly variable and unpredictable.  Thin walled parts are the most susceptible.  

Secondarily,  most of the plastics used in hobby 3D printing are not very UV resistant,  and many of the stronger ones absorb a significant amount of moisture,  possibly enough to make dimensional stability a concern ( not sure if this is significant enough  on  reel sideplates).

For some reels, it should be possible to make a functional sideplate that works for a while, but it is likely to be inferior to the stock plastic or aftermarket aluminum sideplates.

Once you get into higher end printing technology the capability goes way up,  but these machines are too expensive today for personal use.   If you make a software based 3D model, you can web-order printed parts made out of all sorts of materials from nylon to titanium.   There  is usually some sort of sintering involved where heat is used to integrate the layers for prints of functional mechanical parts.  The really fancy technology is already used today to build everything from artificial hips to rocket engines.

Even a garden variety pro print will  be more expensive than  quality machined sideplates from Cortez Conversions or others, and the finish will not be as nice.  Where pro 3D printing really shines in consumer goods is generating prototypes of products that will eventually be molded or die-formed.

There  are lots of other uses for hobby 3D printers for fishing stuff,  especially in the area of facilitating molds for lures.   If you want to get into 3D printing, it is a relatively easy and inexpensive way to get your feet wet in computer aided design and manufacturing.   Even the hobby printers require lots of on-your-own maintenance,  not to mention that you need to learn the CAD software to allow you to design the parts to print.  So it will eat into your fishing time Smiley

-J
« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 12:42:05 PM by jurelometer » Logged
xjchad
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 1417



« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2018, 11:12:01 AM »

I've been using a 3d printer for awhile now. Mostly just for prototyping. There are definitely some that would be capable of making did plates.
Logged

Husband, Father, Fisherman
________________
Chad Bussanich
CJ's Reel and Rig
Reel service, repair, and customizations
cjsreelandrig@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/CJsReelandRig/
Frank
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 448


« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2018, 11:25:29 AM »

Thanks guys. Jurelometer, thanks for taking the time on such a detailed post. I have a much better understanding of the process now.
Logged

Frank. Retired. Life long fishing and boating fanatic.
Dominick
Administrator
Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 8249


San Mateo, California


« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2018, 11:50:08 AM »

Jurelometer that was a very clear and concise explanation of the 3D molding process.  Thanks for that.  Dominick
Logged

Leave the gun.  Take the cannolis.

 Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking beer.
oc1
Sensei
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3355



« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2018, 12:06:52 PM »

It has been done hundreds of times.  Just google 3D printed fishing reel.  Jurelometer described the pitfalls well and most come out looking like a cheap plastic child's toy.  I think CNC milling is a better option for side plates but, again, the quality of the finished product depends the quality of the machine.

One of our sons has a couple of hobby 3D printers and a hobby CNC mill that are just taking up space around here.  Then he got the job he wanted at a place with better equipment so the hobby stuff turned out to be a good investment in the end.  

I had the idea of using his derelict hobby stuff to make reel parts.  Learning to use the software was tough for an old man who has not kept up with technology.  After a month of fiddling with it and making a mountain of plastic scrap I ended up with a part (modified V-Mag 3 head plate) that almost worked but could have been shaped by hand in an hour or so.  Haven't gone back to it despite the best of intentions.
-steve
« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 12:08:05 PM by oc1 » Logged
pjstevko
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 1161



« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2018, 01:13:42 PM »

I often wondered about using these to make lures....Anyone printed any saltwater fishing lures?Huh?
Logged
jurelometer
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 652


« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2018, 01:34:38 PM »

I often wondered about using these to make lures....Anyone printed any saltwater fishing lures?Huh?

I  printed some plugs,   but the best use is mold making.  I used to print and finish a master of the lure, and cast a mold around the master the standard way,  but now I have figured out a method that works for me to print a negative master of the mold halves.  Just pour in some high temp RTV silicone, and its ready to go.



-J
« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 02:16:01 PM by jurelometer » Logged
jurelometer
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 652


« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2018, 02:13:53 PM »

And some hard foam popper fly bodies:

Logged
happyhooker
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1270



« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2018, 05:28:15 PM »

A very informative question/answer session about this relatively new technology, its applications, shortcomings, etc.  Thanks, folks.

Frank
Logged
Frank
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 448


« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2018, 01:23:44 AM »

Thanks for the responses to my post guys. A wealth of knowledge on this site.
Logged

Frank. Retired. Life long fishing and boating fanatic.
pjstevko
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 1161



« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2018, 05:42:02 AM »

I often wondered about using these to make lures....Anyone printed any saltwater fishing lures?Huh?

I  printed some plugs,   but the best use is mold making.  I used to print and finish a master of the lure, and cast a mold around the master the standard way,  but now I have figured out a method that works for me to print a negative master of the mold halves.  Just pour in some high temp RTV silicone, and its ready to go.



-J

Those lures look great! I'll take 6 Cheesy Grin Grin Cheesy
Logged
Reinaard van der Vossen
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 156


« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2018, 09:03:31 AM »

I often wondered about using these to make lures....Anyone printed any saltwater fishing lures?Huh?

Yes, Peter Pakula of Pakula lures has a model, already for years now. The 3D models are printed

Logged
jurelometer
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 652


« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2018, 08:46:57 PM »

Interesting...

Those Pakula heads could be made with a hobby printer.  The layers are pretty thick and the material(ABS) used to be one of the more popular for hobby machines until better options became available.   I would expect that these  3D printed heads would not be as durable as resin heads.

One other thing that is cool about additive manufacturing (the part is built by adding material) like 3D printing, is that complicated internal structures can be built right into the part quite easily.  One example is printing  a whole aircraft landing gear assembly in one shot, instead of a set of parts that need to be assembled.   

In the Pakula lure example,   putting a fancy set of ports into a jet head is trival  for a 3D print, but the options are much more limited when casting or maching the part. Pakula definitely took some advantage of what the technology offers.

-J
Logged
jurelometer
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 652


« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2018, 10:06:42 PM »

More fun with a 3D printer...

A cheap plastic imitation of the Tani bearing packer  Grin



And the bits kept falling out of the holder that came with my Wiha nut driver set, so I made my own.   Much better!



-J
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.203 seconds with 21 queries.