alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Tackle box plans
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December 06, 2019, 05:20:08 PM *
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Author Topic: Tackle box plans  (Read 1951 times)
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oldmanjoe
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« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2018, 08:55:23 AM »

The trouble with wood boxes is the weight.  Steel tool boxes were lighter than the wood boxes they replaced.  The more refined your woodworking skills, the lighter a wood box can be while maintaining strength.  Not a big deal on boat and you are not having to lug it around much.  These days, Plano boxes in fabric bags seem to be the thing.
-steve

     Smiley  When men were men  tackle box  Grin ;.       17-1/2 long, 7-1/2 wide 8-1/2 deep .   About 3-1/2 pounds empty .


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Alto Mare
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« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2018, 10:03:56 AM »

 Cheesy Cheesy...nice box Joe!


Sal
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foakes
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« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2018, 10:24:16 AM »

My Dad has been gone for almost 35 years now.

But when he surf-fished for Perch around San Simeon — all he ever had was an old steel military surplus ammo box painted insignia orange so he could find it later as he moved around.

It was always a tangled mess — but it worked well for him.

Today, there are thousands of options available to us.

Best,

Fred
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gstours
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« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2018, 09:11:52 AM »

  After watching this question develop,  I do hope you you build a tackle box.  Most of us probably have when we were younger,  its certainly a good use of your time and you will learn some things while its completed.  Wood is softer and quieter than many other choices. 
    And when your done it can be handed down in your family to be enjoyed by another generation,  quite possibly a little fisherperson!
  Thanks for the question,  the size is what you make it.   Learn from your heart.    Happy New Year Smiley
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Reel Beaker
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« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2019, 11:56:29 PM »

Mmm...
Isn't wood a bad choice for a tackle box?
Prone to rot and decay?
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rjones
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« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2019, 02:27:32 AM »

Mmm...
Isn't wood a bad choice for a tackle box?
Prone to rot and decay?

That completely depends on the wood you choose and how it is finished.
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Rob
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« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2019, 06:39:43 AM »

A lot of old boats made of wood,take care of it and it will last a long time.
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oc1
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« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2019, 01:51:47 AM »

Dredging up this thread again, here is another approach to building a box that is strong and light.

Cut the sides and bottom from 1/8" luan plywood, paneling or something similar.  The cuts do not need to be perfect.  Tape the pieces together on the outside to make a box.  I used a few pieces of masking tape.



Mix up some resin with a thickener to get something with the consistency of cake frosting.  Use wood flour as a thickener if you intend to have a natural wood finish.  Otherwise use a something like cabosil (silica powder).  Apply the thickened resin to the inside corners to make a smooth fillet.



Let the resin start to set up, but before it gets hard lay strips of fiberglass tape (fiberglass cloth with a selvage edge) along the seams.



Wet the fiberglass out with neat (not thickened) resin.  After it is wet out, the fiberglass will almost disappear.


It is possible to do this with polyester resin but epoxy resin is easier and safer to work with and will give you a longer pot life before it sets up.  



You can epoxy a piece of nylon strap or webbing to the top and bottom to make a very strong, cheap, and non-corroding hinge.  You will probably have to glue one side and clamp it while it dries, then glue the other side,



Finally, coat all the rest of the wood with resin to make sure the wood never gets wet.  Then start sanding, smoothing and fairing to get a satisfactory finish.  I hate this part and am willing to accept some runs or bumps.  

Epoxy resin needs UV protection.  You can varnish it with polyurethane to maintain the appearance of the wood, or paint it.



You'll be surprised how strong the box is.  I can stand on this one.  If you want it to be stronger, do not use thicker wood, add more fiberglass reinforcing.  It is possible to embed fiberglass or carbon fiber fabric on the outside too, but it's tricky because the fabric will want to lift up along the edges before the resin dries.  It can be held down until it dries by wrapping with plastic or peel ply or by vacuum bagging it.  It's easier to just put the reinforcing fabric on the inside.



I have started fishing from a different canoe and my old Pelican tackle box won't fit anywhere.  This little box has a sloped bottom so it will fit into an oddly shaped spot on the foredeck where I can reach it.  It holds a rain shirt, cap, extra jigs, leader material, reel oil, pliers, etc.  Make the box to fit the need.

-steve

« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 01:59:28 AM by oc1 » Logged
Ron Jones
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« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2019, 06:18:20 AM »

Stitch and glue tackle box, I love it!
Ron Jones
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Ronald Jones
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Bill B (Tarfu)
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« Reply #24 on: April 22, 2019, 07:46:10 AM »

Kind of reminds me of a dive boat I went on in the early 90's out of Long Beach, CA. the cabin bulk head was held together with bailing wire in a running stitch down the corner and fiber glass covering it  Shocked   Got to Catalina Island to find out their air compressor was in-op and they had to ferry our tanks to another boat for filling.....last time I ever went out on that boat.....But not taking way with what you have done Steve, I would feel more comfortable on you canoe than that dive boat....Bill
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SoCalAngler
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« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2019, 08:28:31 PM »

All good info here but I'd like to add a wooden tackle box is not the best to take on boats. Private boats maybe if they have a good place to store it. On sport boats not so much. I have seen many slip, bounced or dropped off the place there they were set just to split open and dump their contents all over the deck. Also they are a bit limited for storage to their overall weight.

Don't get me wrong wooden boxes are cool and have their place for storage at home or on private boats but IMO on a long range style boat I think there is way better options.

I really like Mark's stuff and alike and to build one yourself even better. I'd just hate for anyone to spend all that time on such great work only to have it damaged beyond repair. Back in the day that was the best way to go, but things change like having two speed reels strait from the factory, braided supper lines. carbon fiber drags and fluorocarbon leaders.

I get nostalgia and looking different, heck I do it too but if your going to buy or build a wooden box think about it's use before you set it on a boats tackle box shelves, it's transport or what ever.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 08:30:08 PM by SoCalAngler » Logged
Hamachi
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« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2019, 02:12:09 PM »

A few years ago I got the urge to build a box. My rudimentary google skills found these plans. And finished product. Hidden talent for those who know me.


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