alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial old line
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
February 22, 2019, 04:45:08 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: old line  (Read 647 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
milne
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 148


« on: February 09, 2019, 11:27:47 PM »

Hi All,
        I intend on removing the old line on this 1st generation 12 that I recently obtained.
    My thoughts were to leave it off, as this is a display reel only.  I don't know too much about this type of line, all the vintage reels so far
  that I have received that have had line on, has turned out to be in poor condition and rotten.
  This line looks in superb condition,   what has everyone else done in this circumstance ?  put the line back on ? or stored the line separately ?
  It may be just me, but I would prefer, if the spool is in great condition, to display it without....  or am I wrong in that line of thinking ?
  Thanks in advance

 Col


* IMG_1186.JPG (2161.09 KB, 3264x2448 - viewed 8 times.)
Logged
Cor
Cape Town
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 620


I am probably fishing......


« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2019, 12:57:05 AM »

I know nothing about collecting old reels, but to me the line is part of its history and should remain there.
Is this proper fishing line of the time?   Does not look right to me but sure someone will comment.

TRIED TO MAKE MY QUESTION A BIT CLEARER.
I have seen the "cord" used pre war, it would collect water and with every cast the guys got sprayed wet and some wore apron like gear to remain dry.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 04:33:20 AM by Cor » Logged

Cornelis
milne
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 148


« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2019, 02:06:15 AM »

Hi Cor,
         It's the line they used in 1937, mono wasn't available then, so this is what they fished with in the day.
        I have heard them talk of Linen line and a lot of the Pre war ones I bought it still had it on, but was had it well and truly.
       From what I've read, some take it off, clean it and put it back on, where others leave it off.
    So I guess I was after their thoughts on it , what they do with it etc....
         

Col
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 02:09:45 AM by milne » Logged
54bullseye
Firearms Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 480



« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2019, 02:26:47 AM »

You could send it to me !!! I will use it !!  Lol !   John Taylor
Logged
Tiddlerbasher
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 2507



« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2019, 03:16:33 AM »

Remove the line - clean and lube the reel - clean the line (washing machine?), dry it and put it back on the reel - It's part of the history.
Logged
George6308
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 246


« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2019, 03:20:35 AM »

The line appears to be braided Nylon Squidding line from the 60ís/70ís.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 03:23:25 AM by George6308 » Logged
milne
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 148


« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2019, 04:04:57 AM »

Remove the line - clean and lube the reel - clean the line (washing machine?), dry it and put it back on the reel - It's part of the history.

Thanks for that, I wanted to remove it to look underneath anyway, So, I'll do that first, transfer it onto something else
then go from there.
The line appears to be braided Nylon Squidding line from the 60ís/70ís.

I think its that Cuttyhunk linen line ? not nylon braid, and possibly original from the period....
I did the test on it as mentioned here and it's definately not nylon, it burns to an ash, it doesn't melt together as nylon braid would.

I'm picking another 12/0 would be suitable for storing it on, it's not packed on tight at all, it's quite loose on the spool, I'm picking there would
be a few yards of it any way.  It looks really clean, has no smell, unlike the rotten stuff from previous reels. Anyway, I'll get it off and go from there.

Col


Logged
1badf350
Firearms Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 625


-Chris


« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2019, 04:30:18 AM »

Col I would reel that line onto another 12/0 and inspect the spool. I would probably reel it back on, especially if the spool has any issues.
If i decided I didnt want it I would send it to 54Bullseye.
You just have to be careful not to get it in a tangled mess.
Logged

-Chris

"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them."
John Wayne as J.B. Books in "The Shootist"
oldmanjoe
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 423



« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2019, 12:23:14 PM »

 Smiley  You could get a line dryer and store it on the dryer next to the reel   Roll Eyes..
Logged

Grandpa`s word of wisdom......Joey that thing between your shoulders is not a hat rack.....    use it.....
A mind is like a parachute, it only work`s  when it is open.......
oc1
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 2062



« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2019, 12:48:37 PM »

Really beautiful line there Col.  Probably 36-thread but could be 54-thread.  You can count the threads to confirm.  Multiply thread count by three to get the approximate original pound test.  Being a natural fiber, linen will not be as strong now as it was when new.  

If the line was used it will have salts in it and will need to be put on a line dryer and washed.  It looks brand new and unused but it's possible the line was reversed (top to bottom).  You will know for sure when it is removed from the reel.  

I'm not a collector but think having the original line adds a lot to the looks and interest of an old reel.  The ORCA dogma is to remove old line and throw it away so it does not degrade the spool.  They're all idiots.  The looks of a 12/0 Senator has not changed to the untrained eye, but everyone will recognize that it is not modern line.

-steve
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 12:51:38 PM by oc1 » Logged
milne
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 148


« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2019, 08:56:05 PM »

Thanks everyone for your comments, appreciated.
None of the old line I've had on my old reels so far has been in any state to preserve, this is the first that looks in good condition.
Smiley  You could get a line dryer and store it on the dryer next to the reel   Roll Eyes..
Joe, I've not seen or heard of a "line dryer" before, I'll try and search for what they look like, thankyou.
Col I would reel that line onto another 12/0 and inspect the spool. I would probably reel it back on, especially if the spool has any issues.
If i decided I didn't want it I would send it to 54Bullseye.
You just have to be careful not to get it in a tangled mess.
Chris, that's my only 12/0 so far, BUT, I recon that's a good enough excuse to target another !!!!
       I'm hoping that the spool is in as good a condition as the rest of the reel is, If so, I sort of like the idea, especially a big 12/0 of showing it off
       Without line on it,    Have any of yours come with old line Chris ?     and what do you prefer ?

Really beautiful line there Col.  Probably 36-thread but could be 54-thread.  You can count the threads to confirm.  Multiply thread count by three to get the approximate original pound test.  Being a natural fiber, linen will not be as strong now as it was when new. 

If the line was used it will have salts in it and will need to be put on a line dryer and washed.  It looks brand new and unused but it's possible the line was reversed (top to bottom).  You will know for sure when it is removed from the reel. 

I'm not a collector but think having the original line adds a lot to the looks and interest of an old reel.  The ORCA dogma is to remove old line and throw it away so it does not degrade the spool.  They're all idiots.  The looks of a 12/0 Senator has not changed to the untrained eye, but everyone will recognize that it is not modern line.

-steve

Hi Steve,
             I've read your posts on old line with interest and quickly realised you had a lot of konowledge on the topic.  This particular line, has three main "threads" so to speak, then if you rub it between your fingers and open up one of them, it's made up of what looks like at least a dozen tiny strands.
I take it that's what you mean by counting those tiny strands individually to calculate breaking strain ?.
This has sparked my interest now, I'll try and see if I can count them, I'll see if it shows up with a photo and post it.

Thanks guys
Very informative

Col
Logged
milne
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 148


« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2019, 09:26:26 PM »

Ok,  So I have a new Hobby,   involving the dissection of old fishing line  Grin

Steve,   Just so I get a proper understanding,  Below to the left is the original line, with three main Threads,
             To the right, is one of those threads opened up, I counted 13 strands, you might be able to see with my photo, hopefully it came out
            clear enough. So your saying, 13 x 3  =39, that being the pound strength the line was rated at ??
       Hope I understood you properly, please excuse my ignorance if I got it wrong.

Col
                 


* IMG_1219.JPG (1486.9 KB, 3264x2448 - viewed 4 times.)
Logged
oc1
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 2062



« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2019, 10:51:21 PM »

Thirteen is a weird number Col.  39-thread would not be much more difficult to make, but the norm is 24-, 36- or 54-thread.  Whatever, it looks like pristine line.  After a single use it starts to get a bit fuzzy and stained.

39 threads X 3 pounds per thread = about 117 pound test when new.  The rule of thumb used to be to put 24-thread line on a 9/0, 36-thread line on a 12/0 and 54-thread line on a 16/0.  Harnell rods (and perhaps other brands) as well as the double built split bamboo and hardwood rods that preceeded them were often sold as 24-, 36- or 54-thread rods.  The thread count referred to the line so you could match the rod flex to the line strength and, therefore, match the rod flex to the maximum drag setting. They probably used something like the modern formula that maximum drag is 25 or 30% of the line strength.
-steve
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 11:20:39 PM by oc1 » Logged
milne
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 148


« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2019, 11:03:54 PM »

Thanks Steve, At least I got the theory right on it.......

 This was one of Rays reels that I managed to purchase, I found that he had posted a photo and description on it in the Penn senator " from the beginning"
Thread, after I purchased it.   I'm useless on a computer, otherwise I would copy his post here.
Basically it is how he found it, He did open it up and in his opinion had very little use if any, which could explain the great condition of the line.
So perhaps it has never seen water.
I do not know whether he removed the line to inspect the spool. It is wound on very loosely and I can pull it sideways and see that the spool looks in superb condition ( from what I can see), but, I do want to remove the entire line to inspect the spool.  These bigger reels look, in my opinion, superb without line, if the spool is in minty condition, so I was considering leaving it off.
Maybe the option of making something up to display the line separately would appease.......
Thanks for the explanation Steve

Col 
Logged
oldmanjoe
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 423



« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2019, 10:38:15 AM »

Smiley  You could get a line dryer and store it on the dryer next to the reel   Roll Eyes..
    Some pictures of line dryers.


* Vintage-Fishing-line-dryer-ANTIQUE-fishing-gear-COLLECTIBLE.jpg (30 KB, 400x400 - viewed 136 times.)

* Fishing-Line-Dryer-Fly-Fishing-Gear-COLLECTIBLE-Line.jpg (28.61 KB, 300x400 - viewed 137 times.)

* download.jpeg (10.79 KB, 275x183 - viewed 134 times.)
Logged

Grandpa`s word of wisdom......Joey that thing between your shoulders is not a hat rack.....    use it.....
A mind is like a parachute, it only work`s  when it is open.......
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.205 seconds with 18 queries.