alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial what can be dangerous?
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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hafnor
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« on: October 13, 2011, 04:28:03 PM »

I for one is interested in knowing what is dangerous in the equipment we use. We use a lot of different greases oils, removing agents etc. Is there anything to be aware of when dealing with chemicals, any tips on how to stay safe, what to wash your hands with etc?

I for one have been smelling a lot of that cnc rust remover(not by means) but have felt a little obnoxious afterwards (I know thats not good). I have also cut out some rods before using a dremel and I sneezed carbon fiber particals the day after.. dangerous?

the means of this thread is to map out some warnings and prevention methods for dealing with  possible health issue equipment
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redsetta
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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2011, 05:30:11 PM »

Good thread Hafnor.
I reckon many of us underestimate the cumulative effect of long-term exposure to the products we use, particularly carb cleaner etc. I usually step out the workshop door to spray bearings, though.
I understand prolonged exposure to even low-toxicity grease can cause a range of skin conditions and is discouraged.
That said, I've been working on engines, motorbikes and reels etc for more than 20 years and am yet to start wearing latex gloves (perhaps I should, though).
I try to minimise chemical use, but it's inevitable that we'll all have an array of products in the workshop.
My list generally includes (ordered according to use):
  • White spirit
  • Marine grease
  • CRC 556
  • Carb cleaner
  • ReelX
  • Shimano lube
  • Kroil (penetrating oil)
  • Silicon spray
  • Autosol (metal polish)
  • Lighter fluid
I use a vinegar/water mix to dissolve salt build-up and Simple Green from time to time - mostly white spirit, though.
I always wear a mask when using the Dremel on Bakelite (eg Senator side plates) as it's s'posed to be quite toxic.
Here's a link to a Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards that may be of use.Be interested to hear others' thoughts on this topic...
Cheers, Justin
« Last Edit: October 13, 2011, 05:31:59 PM by redsetta » Logged

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seaeagle2
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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2011, 07:06:42 PM »

When you wife finds out what you REALLY paid for all the reels and tools you picked up.....and according to Alan, if your wife catches you using the dishwasher..... I saw a quote somewhere, "My biggest fear is after I die, my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them, instead of what they're worth"....
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alantani
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 12:50:47 PM »

about a year ago, i finally started using gloves.
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hafnor
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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2011, 11:20:10 AM »

how come alan? does the grease affect your hands in some way?
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alantani
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« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2011, 01:51:41 PM »

my wife had complained about the odor of grease for years.  even after a shower, you could still smell it.  figured it was a small sacrifice to keep peace in the family. 
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Alto Mare
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« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2011, 03:03:46 PM »

my wife had complained about the odor of grease for years.  even after a shower, you could still smell it.  figured it was a small sacrifice to keep peace in the family. 

 Lips Sealed !....I'm not touching this one Wink.
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broadway
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2011, 04:26:14 PM »

Sal, You beat me to it... LOL!

        I would be careful of acetone, carb cleaner, and any spirits.  However, if you smoke, like I do (gotta quit soon!) then you might as well not worry about anything cause the cigs will probably destroy our lungs before these other chemicals do.  As for skin problems gloves should do the trick, but I feel they get in the way of my dexterity and the natural flow of things.  Just try to do any spraying of these chemicals outdoors or in a garage with the door open.  Well-ventilated is not a window being cracked!  Stay safe and have fun... gotta go have a smoke now Angry
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Keta
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« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2011, 11:50:11 AM »

I hate working in gloves but do occasionaly, but grease is one of the better things I smell like....especialy when I'm cleaning manure out of the barn. 


Get a MSDS for every chemical you use, it will list the hazards and what you should do to protect yourself from exposure.
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Hi, my name is Lee and I have a fishing gear problem.
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Nuvole
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« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2011, 05:30:35 AM »

my wife had complained about the odor of grease for years.  even after a shower, you could still smell it.  figured it was a small sacrifice to keep peace in the family. 

Get yourself a bottle of "Fast Orange"
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josa1
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« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2011, 05:18:35 PM »

Hey All, Happy Friday!

The chemicals I've used over the years as a Commercial Air Conditioning Mechanic more than likely far outweigh what most users of this board are, or have been, exposed to.  When I retired I became more aware of the things that might have a long term impact on my longevity.

After doing a quick search around my garage I realize that it's a haven for toxic chemicals. I have a few suggestions....

a) READ THE MANUFACTURER'S INSTRUCTIONS!!  There's a lot of thought, testing and research put into those simple "Directions for Use" paragraphs on chemical containers.  I do believe that they are as thorough as need be for safe use!

b)  WEAR GLOVES.  I didn't do this for years but now find it second nature to put on gloves for most reel repair servicing projects.  I've tried several different varieties and have found the nitrile gloves sold by COSCO as the strongest and longest lasting.  Where I used to use two or three "left" gloves for a project, I now find I only use about as many left gloves as right gloves.  The difference being that I hold the object I'm cleaning in my left hand and thus it gets doused with whatever cleaning chemical I'm attempting to use at the time.

c) WEAR SAFETY GLASSES.  This doesn't require any explanation.  I got a pair of safety goggles with my pneumatic nailer and I use them a lot.  If I do anything stupid, it's usually not wearing the glasses for some "safe" operation.

d) VENTILATE!  I now open the lift door and side entrance door of my garage when I'm doing reel service.  The most volitile substance I use seems to be the brake cleaner and the fumes are prolific.  I'm going to try to find a different product for what I use this for, cleaning bearings.  Also, I can't seem to get myself to wear a mask although I'm sure I should at times.

e)  THINK!  As I get older, I seem to take things for granted that I would never have in the past.  I think good planning for a project should include a mental plan of the the tools and chemicals needed along with hashing over the repair proceedure you want to do.

Don't mean to preach, just want all my resourses out there to stay healthy!
 
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alantani
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« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2011, 07:06:11 PM »

good advise.  i've actually been doing all of the above.  and i definitely get the "as i get older" part! 
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Snagged2
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« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2011, 07:49:02 PM »

Don't forget a mask or respirator ,, as protection from particulates,, from cutting, grinding,, etc.. as well as vapors..

some of that stuff, can put a permanent change in your health record quickly...
« Last Edit: October 21, 2011, 07:50:01 PM by Snagged2 » Logged
coastalobsession
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« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2011, 04:41:21 AM »

Also never mix a bunch of chemicals to make a so called SUPERCLEANER.
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saltydog
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« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2012, 05:43:53 PM »

One of the biggest things beyond respratory particulates is those pescy little things flying in the air(safety glasses) almost lost an eye a few years ago due to a broken piece of bakelite but I had glasses on.That little bugger stuck in the glasses I was wearing. Shocked
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