alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial experimenting with my lathe
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
November 20, 2019, 12:40:44 PM *
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Author Topic: experimenting with my lathe  (Read 1238 times)
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Donnyboat
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« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2019, 12:01:48 PM »

Good work Sal, Nice & beefy, I like the idea of top hats, I have a few reels with them, cheers Don.
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Don, or donnyboat
Alto Mare
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« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2019, 06:17:19 PM »

Thatís really neat work there Sal. I like how you decided to remove a washer and add it to the top hat. Pretty good idea!

How long did it take from start to finish?
About an hour and 15 minutes.
I did a second one and gained about 15 minutes, but then my wife called me up for dinner, she usually gives me 5 minutes warning and it isn't pretty if I don't make it.
I think I rushed a little while drilling to size and screwed it up...another good lesson.

Thanks!

Sal
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« Reply #17 on: June 23, 2019, 01:54:38 AM »


... but then my wife called me up for dinner, she usually gives me 5 minutes warning and it isn't pretty if I don't make it.



 Grin   Roll Eyes
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Fred from Biarritz ,
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« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2019, 06:16:12 AM »

endless possibilities!  Nice work.

Andy
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« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2019, 09:07:22 AM »

Great work Sal. Take your time and who knows what you may make next. Keep up the good work. Wish I had room to tinker with a lathe. I still have my rod lathe to play with when the garage cools down again.

Dwight
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Dominick
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« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2019, 07:55:04 PM »

Good luck Sal.  Watch out for Cathy's left.  She will hit you with so many lefts, you'll beg her for a right.   Cheesy Grin  Dominick
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« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2019, 11:25:02 PM »

Good work, Sal.
SS is the material I typically work with.  Not too bad once you get the right cutting bits.  While carbide will last longer, smaller machines don't usually have enough power to take advantage of their potential.  HSS generally can take a sharper edge and give a better finish, but the sharp edge doesn't last as long.  Certainly, speeds need to be lower than carbide.
Use cutting fluid whenever drilling or parting off.
Keep up the good work.
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Bill B (Tarfu)
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« Reply #22 on: July 01, 2019, 05:05:11 PM »

Bravo Sal !  impressive work...Bill
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It may not be very productive,
but it's sure going to be interesting!
Three se7ens
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« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2019, 07:11:17 PM »

Nice job!  303 stainless machines much better than 304 and 316 stainless.  If youre looking for saltwater corrosion resistance, stick with 316 though.  The additional molybdenum in 316 specifically improves corrosion resistance in salt water.  Its also a little harder, and machines slightly better than 304. 

The tricky thing with machining stainless is that its relatively soft, but very tough.  Sharp, and wear resistant tools make all the difference.  High quality HSS is a minimum and carbide being preferred. I use both depending on the circumstances and machine. 
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Alto Mare
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« Reply #24 on: September 16, 2019, 03:44:16 PM »

Thanks Adam! Iím learning quite a bit as I keep using it.

Sal
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« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2019, 07:12:10 PM »

Very cool,,,,,I had to hand sand ss before to round the edges off,,,,, Angry it takes time,,,,, Cheesy great job uncle sal,,,,,,, Grin
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