alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Making tools for rod building with my 3D printer
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Author Topic: Making tools for rod building with my 3D printer  (Read 1525 times)
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jurelometer
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« on: November 19, 2019, 06:51:07 PM »

I usually build a rod when I need something that I cannot find commercially.   Usually functional, but nothing to be proud of appearance-wise.

I have been using my 3D printer for making tools and fixtures for other projects, so it was time to see if I could build up some tools to step up my game in the rod building department.

First off, a fixture for my palm router with a flush trim bit for sizing the inside of cork rings.  I made a set of drop in templates for the fixture, with the hole diameter increasing .02 inches at a time.  The rings were dry fit on the blank, and the fixture allowed the resized holes to be perfectly centered.   Much better than gluing the rings together and then reaming a tapered hole- at least for me.  Here is a video:


https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DG-vgrbHwBNHz4vAFO8Hja35STSY70yu/view

Next up, wrapped the blank with some teflon plumber's tape and glued the rings together on the the blank with Titebond 3 , which I think is a better glue for cork than epoxy.   

Here are the rings being glued up with a clamping fixture that I printed up.   This fixture allowed me to use some existing bar clamps.



 Everything clamped up nice and the gaps between the rings were nearly invisible.



 Once the glue dried, I removed the teflon tape and epoxied the grip to the blank I prefer epoxy for attaching the cork to the blank).

Then I turned down the grip on the blank.

Next up, I printed a self-centering Longworth chuck attachment for my fly drying turner that I had printed a while back.  Now I have a rod drying turner:


For the last step, I got lazy and tried to apply this finish to the wraps in one coat, which came out a bit ugly, so I am not going to share a photo Smiley  Why is it always the last step where things go south?

I was contemplating rewrapping the rod, but took it out fishing, caught a bunch of fish, and now the finish doesn't bother me at all.


For those of you that haven't tried those burl cork rings, or the Fuji palming seats for the bigger low profile baitcasters- you are missing out.  I am really happy with the rod functionally, and with a bit of boat rash, the finish on the guides doesn't look so bad...

Here is a the final rod in action.   I decided I wanted a hook holder, so I printed one out as well.  And printed up a mold master to cast the jig in the photo.   



I'll do a writeup on  lure design using CAD and 3D printing if folks are interested.

-J
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mhc
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« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2019, 04:33:23 AM »

Great stuff Dave, thanks for sharing what you are 3D printing. I'm always interested to see how people design and make things in any medium - I might not be thinking of rod buildng or making jig molds at the moment but there are often design aspects or processes that are transferrable to unrelated projects and materials that can help trigger ideas for anyone making or modifying things. Foe example, I'd be interested in seeing a little more detail/photos of the self-centering chuck and router fixture.

Mike 
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It can't be too difficult - a lot of people do it.
Donnyboat
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« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2019, 06:20:07 AM »

Good post Dave, although you got poor old Mikes brain rattling now ay, he wont sleep for a week, cheers Don.
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Don, or donnyboat
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« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2019, 06:22:33 AM »

Makes me think that "printing" clear end plates for my "49" project would be a good way to go...IF I had the printer....and the "smarts" to use it ! Roll Eyes
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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2019, 07:06:39 AM »

Very interesting!
I think this seems to be the way to go for the future.

Besides it probably being nice to make your own components, and lures and whatever else, how does it compare price wise to print your own or buy something?
Are those of us who are that way inclined all going to purchase 3 D printers in the future.....probably distant future??

I make a lot of stuff, but this seems to open up many doors.
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2019, 10:49:28 AM »

I sure wish I knew something about 3D and their costs were more reasonable. There sure are a lot of obsolete reel parts, plastic, nylon & metal, that could be 3D printed. Oscillation blocks, bail arms & plates, gears & handle knobs immediately come to mind.  Wink 
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

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Favorite Activity? ............... In our boat fishing
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mo65
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« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2019, 11:01:52 AM »

I sure wish I knew something about 3D and their costs were more reasonable. There sure are a lot of obsolete reel parts, plastic, nylon & metal, that could be 3D printed. Oscillation blocks, bail arms & plates, gears & handle knobs immediately come to mind.  Wink 

   Yes indeed...and don't forget those pesky cracked drag knobs! Cool
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steelfish
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« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2019, 03:57:14 PM »

wow, this site never stop to amaze me, well the members actually

that 3D printed tools are really amazing (every time I see something cool that came out from a 3D printer I remember my younger days when we saw that on Sci Fi movies).

I have a question compa Dave,
do you think the chuck you made on the 3D printer fit on a standar dry setup stand from CRB?

mine is the same than in the attached pic and the hole is already "too soft/lose" and doest hold the blanks or rod butts as well as when new, so Im looking for alternatives, not in a hurry but it was a nice coincidence that you made your own self centered chuck.

if you think you can print another and sell it to me send me a PM please, I know nothing about 3D printing so, making one of this chuck might be 3x expensier than getting a new dry motor/stand.


* CRB-Rod-Dryer-Image.jpg (50.35 KB, 654x530 - viewed 41 times.)
« Last Edit: November 20, 2019, 04:15:47 PM by steelfish » Logged
jurelometer
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« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2019, 04:48:43 PM »

I sure wish I knew something about 3D and their costs were more reasonable. There sure are a lot of obsolete reel parts, plastic, nylon & metal, that could be 3D printed. Oscillation blocks, bail arms & plates, gears & handle knobs immediately come to mind.  Wink 

   Yes indeed...and don't forget those pesky cracked drag knobs! Cool

You mean like this?


* image.jpg (252.3 KB, 800x598 - viewed 39 times.)
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Midway Tommy
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« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2019, 07:37:01 PM »


You mean like this?

I'm envious! Cool
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

Tommy D (ORCA), NE



Favorite Activity? ............... In our boat fishing
RELAXING w/ MY BEST FRIEND (My wife Bonnie)
mo65
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« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2019, 06:10:27 AM »

You mean like this?

   Is that a drag knob on a Penn 720 you've made there? Sweet!
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« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2019, 07:29:30 AM »

That is awesome! I really like your chuck on the turner. It is like a chuck for a wood turning lathe!
« Last Edit: November 21, 2019, 07:30:17 AM by The Fishing Hobby » Logged
Midway Tommy
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« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2019, 03:11:15 PM »

Quote
Next up, wrapped the blank with some teflon plumber's tape and glued the rings together on the the blank with Titebond 3 , which I think is a better glue for cork than epoxy.

While Titebond may penetrate the cork better than epoxy I have my reservations about the longevity of their "Waterproof" claims. PL400 has always claimed to be "Waterproof". I have seen first hand where, when exposed to moister over long periods of time, PL400 has failed. Epoxy has been proven to be "waterproof" so if I'm going to build my own rod I'm going to use what has a proven track record.
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

Tommy D (ORCA), NE



Favorite Activity? ............... In our boat fishing
RELAXING w/ MY BEST FRIEND (My wife Bonnie)
The Fishing Hobby
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« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2019, 03:49:01 PM »

Quote
Next up, wrapped the blank with some teflon plumber's tape and glued the rings together on the the blank with Titebond 3 , which I think is a better glue for cork than epoxy.

While Titebond may penetrate the cork better than epoxy I have my reservations about the longevity of their "Waterproof" claims. PL400 has always claimed to be "Waterproof". I have seen first hand where, when exposed to moister over long periods of time, PL400 has failed. Epoxy has been proven to be "waterproof" so if I'm going to build my own rod I'm going to use what has a proven track record.
Titebond III works well on cork for grips and holds up great on outdoor furniture in my personal experience. Most epoxy isn't actually waterproof...but in saying that, we both know on a fishing rod it works great and the moisture it is exposed to isn't an issue. I glue my cork together with Titebond III and use epoxy to bond the grip to the blank. I have also used epoxy to bond cork to cork and I just prefer the Titebond III. Either works well from my experience.
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jurelometer
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« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2019, 10:25:46 PM »


Here is a bit more on Longworth chucks:

The Longworth is the simplest self-centering chuck that I am aware of.   It was originally invented for turning large wood pieces by an Australian chap (but not the same one that invented Vegemite Smiley ).

Here is the front view of my design:



And the back view:

 

The grey front plate is attached to the drive shaft.  The jaws (green) have a bolt that passes through the slots in the front plate and back plate (red).   To tighten or loosen the jaws, the back plate is rotated while the front plate is held stationary.




I have a question compa Dave,
do you think the chuck you made on the 3D printer fit on a standar dry setup stand from CRB?


I assume that the old chuck can be removed from the motor, and will leave an exposed D shaft - probably 6 mm or maybe 1/4 inch.

I would be happy to make you one, but I have a pretty big backload of projects, and I am also in the middle of upgrading the printer.   So it could be quite awhile.   

The good news is that Longworth chucks are incredibly easy and fun to make.  Just screw together two 1/4 inch plywood disks, drill a hole through the center, and rout out the curved slots.   remove the screws, flip one of the disks around and now you have the front and back plates. Add some dowels, pvc pipe, wine corks or whatever for jaws.  One machine screw and nut for each jaw, and you are almost there.  The front plate is locked to the shaft, and the back plate rotates on the shaft.   How you want to attach the shaft to the motor is up to you, but if you get  a bit clever, you can probably come up a slip clutch as well.

I can send you a PDF with a pattern for the chuck plates.   

-J
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