alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Making tools for rod building with my 3D printer
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Author Topic: Making tools for rod building with my 3D printer  (Read 1531 times)
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Robert Janssen
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« Reply #15 on: November 22, 2019, 12:32:46 AM »

That is cool.
Seems to me, that the arcuate slots could in fact be straight. Not quite as slick, but still functional. That would make things much easier for hobby / DIY folks.

.
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steelfish
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« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2019, 10:20:26 AM »

The good news is that Longworth chucks are incredibly easy and fun to make. 

I can send you a PDF with a pattern for the chuck plates.   
-J

well the problem to made this kind of DIY project is the lack of tools, but send me the PDF so I can have an idea if its something I can do.
I have another dryer on the power wrapper lathe, so I can wait for you to have time.
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jurelometer
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« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2019, 02:15:28 PM »

The good news is that Longworth chucks are incredibly easy and fun to make. 

I can send you a PDF with a pattern for the chuck plates.   
-J

well the problem to made this kind of DIY project is the lack of tools, but send me the PDF so I can have an idea if its something I can do.
I have another dryer on the power wrapper lathe, so I can wait for you to have time.


Hey Alex,

What does the driveshaft on your motor look like after you take off the current chuck?

BTW:  An electric drill, a jigsaw and a file is all that you need.   There are lots of threads on building Longworth chucks on the web.  Here is one:  http://ravenview.com/blog/2010/10/17/how-to-make-a-longworth-chuck/

An interesting thing about this version is that the backplate is connected to the drive, and the front plate is rotated to open/close the jaws.  This might be easier for your design.

At any rate, for a rod dryer we do not need a chuck as robust and accurate as the ones you see online for wood turning.

1.  To make the disks nice and round after cutting, use a machine  screw and nut through the center,  tighten up and spin on a drill.  Use a file or sandpaper along the edge to get the disks nice and round.

2.  To cut the curved slots,  make a simple jig out of scrap:  drill two holes at a distance equal to the radius of the arc.  The jig rotates on a screw that goes through the first hole in the jig.  The screw is attached to the plates at the center of the arc for a  slot.  Now use the other hole as a guide for your drill.  Drill out a bunch of holes along the path of the arc,  file/sand out the high spots, and you are done.   The slot width should be just slightly larger than your jaw screw diameter.  If you are  more coordinated than I,  you can just freehand the drilling and skip the jig.

Or you can find somebody in your town that works with wood,  show them the web instructions/videos, and give them a printout of my template.   It is such a fast project, it should be relatively inexpensive.  But the design cannot be finished until we know how we can attach the chuck to the motor.

-J
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steelfish
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« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2019, 05:28:24 PM »


Hey Alex,

What does the driveshaft on your motor look like after you take off the current chuck?
-J

I dont know, but I can check that out later today, I just need to take one screw out and some pics
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« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2019, 06:42:35 PM »

I wanted to catch up on the questions on this thread.

Ther is a bit of a misconception about what 3D printing can do, especially at the hobby  end.  Metal parts ar out of the question at the hobby side. The printed plastic parts  approach the strength of injection molded along one axis, but because the partis made in layers, it is much weaker along the other axis.

 Here is a quick write up: https://alantani.com/index.php?topic=26604.msg303010#msg303010

Mike:   I have read that 3D printed plastic fixtures are sometimes used to hold oddly shaped metal parts for machining,  especially when the tolerances are a bit generous. I think that the  thing that I keep forgetting and relearning is the value of using CNC machines for making fixtures for further construction and assembly.  The accuracy is so high  that it is often practical  to have an entirely different set of steps to execute a project.  It is easy to fall into the trap of using the new technology to do things the old way.

Crow:  there are some 3D filaments that are pretty clear, but because the part is made by squirting out threads of melted plastic, all of the layer lines prevent the part from being transparent. Translucent is about as good as it gets.

Cor:   A decent hobby printer can cost under USD $200 if you build it from scratch from individual components,  more like $700 if you want  a quality kit.  If you are not willing to assemble it yourself, then don't bother getting a printer,  as taking the stupid thing apart and fixing something is a regular occurrence.  The cheapest plastic filament for printing that won't clog your printer is about $20 a kilo, and goes up from there.  So  if you designed a big plug that weighed about 40 grams before adding ballast,  that should mean about 50 plugs per kilo, plus electricity for printing , failed prototypes, replacement printer parts, etc.   The printer really shines where you want to do some iterative design and go through a couple generations to get the design just right.

The real work is in learning the CAD software to design your parts. There are some good programs for free, so it doesn't cost anything to get started.

Tommy/Mo:   Some plastic parts can be reproduced.  Things like knobs and handles are easy.  Something like a 720 crosswind block is doable, but about as far as I would go.  Functional metal parts requires expensive printers and materials.   Too expensive as of today,  even using a service.

Regarding Titebond 3 for cork grips:   I found the recommendation on Rodbuilding.org.   It is a type 1  ("waterproof") glue which means it had to survive a pretty rigorous test (two rounds of immersion in boiling water for four hours?). I had trouble with epoxy,  as I would get some joint starvation if I didn't  make the glue line so thick that it was visible.   I have been fishing this rod a lot.   If the Titebond 3 fails,  I promise to fess up. Smiley

I think that covers everything.   

-J
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« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2019, 07:48:50 PM »

Well I guess I should 'fess up that I build, exclusively, pre-made Tennessee grips with slip rings and, at the most, I'll add 3 or maybe 4 single decorative cork rings towards the ends or in between the factory joint. Epoxy doesn't create problems it that grouping.
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

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« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2019, 08:16:59 AM »

Dave dude, Wink  You are over the top with your technical ideas and modernistic ability to tackle some of our challenges at the simple hobby level that us common folk live in!   Thanks for the information and sharing the pictures.  Your approach to the solution is amazing to me and others. 
    I,m still amazed at the 3d master jigs forms you made and your silicone molds abilitys.
 I am forever grateful and careful with the silicone mold that you made for me.  Its holding up well, starting to surface harden slightly in areas but overall in very good condition.
  We all appreciate seeing and hearing from your higher technological oversight in problem solving.   Thanks Again.



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jurelometer
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« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2019, 06:17:57 PM »

Thanks Gary.     It has been really interesting talking fishing with you, and I have learned a lot.  
Glad to hear that the mold is holding up.   Since we have the master, it is easy enough to pour a fresh one.  Maybe try stepping up in size,  especially if you can get mix up one of those bullet  alloys  that pours at a lower temp than pure lead.

But I am thinking that you should give that fat bottom jig a whirl.  I think that the master  I gave you would make a jig about 20 oz.  if you measure the length,  I can give you a more accurate number.   The smaller ones  fish really well for a variety of situations, and sinks pretty fast.  With a top rigged assist hook, it does well on the lingcod and rockfish, and does not snag easily.   I have no idea if halibut will eat it, but now have over a dozen different species on it from bottom fish to bluewater species.

-J
« Last Edit: November 26, 2019, 08:07:05 PM by jurelometer » Logged
droppedit
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« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2019, 08:07:35 AM »

I'm curious on which program you are running for the cad 3d. I have Autocad I use but have a hard enough time drawing in 2d.
I'm interested in getting a 3d printer but it will be long after I get my house finished and set up my new shop.

Thanks,
Dave
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jurelometer
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« Reply #24 on: November 28, 2019, 11:02:40 AM »

I'm curious on which program you are running for the cad 3d. I have Autocad I use but have a hard enough time drawing in 2d.
I'm interested in getting a 3d printer but it will be long after I get my house finished and set up my new shop.

Thanks,
Dave

I am not an AutoCAD user, but I thought that this product was more focused on supporting larger scale designs outside of 2D drawings.   Things like architectul designs.

AutoDesk ( the maker of AutoCAD) has a product called Fusion 360.  Subscriptions are currently free for hobbyists and small business.   In terms  of functionality, I think  it is pretty much the only game in town for a hobbyist to consider if you want a full-featured product for free.   Like all Autodesk products, it is a giant hot mess, despite the extra effort made to make Fusion  user friendly.   

Fusion  is cloud based,  which means all of your designs are kept on Autodesk computers, and even some of the computing runs remotely.   I won't go into how often it corrupts a version of my designs  Angry.    This is not a enthusiastic recommendation,  just an acknowledgement that it is the only game in town for a free, powerful  CAD/CAM package   (CAM is needed for CNC machining, but not 3D printing). 

  Fusion is not too tough to learn if you take baby steps and work through the tutorials.   Just diving in and expecting intuitive behavior from this product will lead to frustration.

If you do a search for CAD on this site, you will find several useful discussions.   Try this for a search term on your favorite search engine:

cad site:alantani.com

-J
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