alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial My Self Made Rod Wrapping Tools
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
January 20, 2020, 10:29:34 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: My Self Made Rod Wrapping Tools  (Read 170 times)
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
Midway Tommy
Tom
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1658


Smack dab in the middle of USA - Eastern Nebraska


« on: January 12, 2020, 09:37:39 PM »

In 1992 I decided I wanted to build my own rods. I thought it would be fun & I could save a little money. My first couple of projects were Cabela's Fish Eagle graphite kits. I soon realized that I could upgrade my blanks & guides to make rods that weren't really available to the public, like using Fuji SIC guides, etc. Starting with my third rod I've only built two rods that didn't have SIC guides and that was because I wanted a certain look. I've always preferred Tennessee style cork handles with slip rings. In fact, I've had a couple of high end rods that had standard spinning reel handles and I switched them over to Tennessee slip ring handles. Those were challenging projects Tongue, fitting a two piece cork handle to a blank and sliding it on from the rear without them being too loose  Roll Eyes, but I got 'er done and they turned out great.   Smiley It's almost impossible, now, to find new rods with slip ring cork handles unless it's an ultra-lite.

Anyway, when I started I didn't have the funds to purchase high dollar rod building equipment so I built my own. Motorized wrappers for the hobbyist were just starting to come into their own and I couldn't justify the expense. I purchased a slow RPM drying motor from Cabela's and proceeded, using their catalog as a guide, to build my own stuff. Later, I bought a second drying motor so that I could work on two rods at a time.

So, here's the stuff I made starting 28 years ago.  

I made the wrapper out of some oak I had laying around. It's kind of heavy, which I like because it doesn't move around when I'm working on a rod. It is expandable in either direction. The 1"x2" base slides into the rabbeted slot for adjust-ability and compact storage. The slot in the wrapper base is sized to a 1/4" flat headed elevator type carriage bolt so that the extension slides easily back and forth.



I made it so that I could use four different thread colors at one time. I don't do fancy decorative wrapping so four works great for me. When I made it most hand wrappers were only set up for two different spools. I used 1/4" all-thread to hold the spools. I used a brass tube over the threads to better fit the spool holes and for smoother spool rotation. Tension adjustment is a piece of dense foam sandwiched between two stainless steel washers. I used nylon wing nuts because they don't turn and are easy to adjust. I opened the eye hooks a little so it is easier to change and maneuver thread. The thread stand is easily movable and tightened by wing nuts. The extra rod stand next to the thread stand was an added function. I wrap all my tips and it helps support the rod for wrapping the tip and the next guide.


Here's my handle clamp, pretty basic. I made it out of poplar. It has couplings on the all-thread because I used a carriage bolt from the bottom side so it won't spin.


I started with one drying motor but later decided two would be much more efficient. I had a scrap of aluminum diamond plate so I made a bracket to attach the motors to. I offset/stair stepped the motors so that it would be easier to put finish on the rods. I start with the back/upper rod and then do the front/lower rod. The switches are lighted so I can easily tell whether they're on or not.


I used an ABS cap for the rod butt fitting because it's lighter than PVC. I did, though, insert a PVC cap inside the ABS cap. The ABS cap was too flat inside. The PVC cap is concave and works a lot better for automatically centering any size rod. I used a nylon bushing tube to attach the fitting to the motor shaft. There's a short lag from the back of the fitting into the nylon bushing and the bushing is held on the motor shaft with an allen set screw. I used Chicago screws and rubber bands to hold the rod in place. They actually pull the rod back into the fitting, are easy to use and work great. I've really never yet found a need for a slip clutch.


So, those are my self manufactured rod wrapping devices. I don't have a whole lot invested and they work great for what I do. I did decide that I would concentrate on building a bunch of rods this winter. I've had nine high end graphite spinning rod blanks just sitting in a tube for over 10 years, along with handles and Fuji SIC guide sets, waiting for me to get my butt in gear and build them out. I decided it was about time to get 'em done.  Cool
« Last Edit: January 13, 2020, 10:11:34 AM by Midway Tommy » Logged

Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

Tommy D (ORCA), NE



Favorite Activity? ............... In our boat fishing
RELAXING w/ MY BEST FRIEND (My wife Bonnie)
Sharkb8
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 104


« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2020, 03:12:20 AM »

Thanks for sharing I like your thread holders a lot better than the nails I use in my rod holder

Kim
Logged
mo65
The Freshwater Kid...Chillicothe, Ohio
Sensei
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3432


"This ship is filthy Mr. Christian!"


« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2020, 07:05:36 AM »

Great ingenuity Tom! Cool
Logged

~YOU CAN TUNA GEETAR...BUT YOU CAN'T TUNA FEESH~

Donnyboat
donnyboat
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 1526


« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2020, 07:25:46 AM »

Looks good Tommy, thanks for showing us, very interesting, cheers Don.
Logged

Don, or donnyboat
Cor
Cape Town
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 809


I am probably fishing......


« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2020, 10:20:15 AM »

This is really nice.   
It's great to have this kind of ingenuity.

I also have a home made rod power wrapper, not nearly as well made as yours.
I designed it, made it, changed it, modified it all with the intention of one day re building it....never happened but it has made many pretty nice rods and repaired even more for friends.


Where I live it is simply too expensive to buy the reel mccoy in the US
Logged

Cornelis
The Fishing Hobby
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 365


« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2020, 03:06:41 PM »

Very nicely done! I don't think most hobby rod builders actually need a high speed power wrapper. They would be nice to have for doing long underwraps for people who build rods that need those long underwraps. They would also be handy for people who don't own a lathe for turning grips. High speed (200 rpms or so) is nice for applying epoxy, but not necessary. Outside of those instances, I can't see a good reason for a hobby builder who may build a few rods a year to invest that much money in a power wrapper. Your setup looks very professional! If you ever want a high speed motor for applying finish, I posted a slip clutch chuck made out of a baby bottle the other day on this board. It works well! I just made a solid mount for mine today to replace the vinyl tube mount I showed in the video. I will probably do a follow-up showing the solid mount setup.
Logged
steelfish
the Baja Guy
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 3316


Sea of Cortez


« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2020, 05:18:53 PM »

really nice design and much better craftmanship, I really liked it, specially the expandable rod stands, pretty clever

really beautiful compared to my wood box I use to wrap rods
Logged
happyhooker
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1151



« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2020, 07:48:11 PM »

A-One--I, too, liked the rod stands a bunch--gives me some ideas.

Frank
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.37 seconds with 17 queries.