D.A.M. Quick Champion 700b baitcasting reel

Started by mark Hill, May 20, 2020, 05:46:56 PM

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foakes

#30
Don't know, Mike —

These are pretty straight-forward bait-casters designed for easy take-apart.

They generally just go back together easily — unless something is missing.

If you are stuck — I'll post some photos of the procedure tomorrow.

There is a box in the outer shop of around 70 pounds of these in different levels of disassembly — from completes to skeletons.  Plus I have 5 drawers of all of the parts as NOS.

If we can't figure it out by tomorrow — you can just send it to me for reassembly.

Best, Fred
The Official, Un-Authorized Service and Restoration Center for quality vintage spinning reels.

D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

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"I have never been lost but I was bewildered once for three days." - American frontiersman, Daniel Boone.

foakes

#31
Quote from: PacRat on June 29, 2021, 05:26:10 AM
Hey Fred,
I picked one of these up at the rod and gun club swap-meet. It's in very good condition but the oil and grease are like glue. The oil was actually the worst and it seemed to polymerize into plastic. I used the ultra-sound and got it very clean but I'm struggling with the cross-worm assembly. Is there a secret procedure for reassembling this? I seem to be struggling with the 'D' shaped hole and nylon bushing. I'm assuming the notched end of the guide tube goes in the shaped hole but the bushing must go in first to clear the flat side of the hole? When I do the guide tube first, I can't get the bushing in, and if I put the bushing in first, I cant get the guide tube to nest into the 'D' shaped hole. Any advice would be much appreciated.
Thanks
-Mike

Generally, my method is to remove the tail & head plate assemblies.  Then you have easy access to both sides of the frame for installing the LW system parts.  Then install the tail-plate, spool, and head-plate — and it is complete.

Let us know if more is needed.  You may have a part missing or tweaked — because you generally have all of this figured out and dialed in pretty well.

Best, Fred
The Official, Un-Authorized Service and Restoration Center for quality vintage spinning reels.

D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

--------


"I have never been lost but I was bewildered once for three days." - American frontiersman, Daniel Boone.

Wompus Cat

My experience though somewhat limited in comparison to other Reels is that on these the Tube which houses the Level Wind shaft will install two ways however will only work right one way with the plastic insert .
If a Grass Hopper Carried a Shotgun then the Birds wouldn't MESS with Him

dlrider

Fred. It looks like you need someone to assemble quite a few reels!   ;D

PacRat

#34
Mission accomplished! I'll try do describe this to help others but regrettably I did not take photos (too much of a challenge to do both). The biggest challenge is dealing with the tight tolerances between the bushing (figure no. 31, part no.145-220) and the frame. They call this a bearing but I call it a bushing to avoid confusion. This part must go into the frame on the 'D' shaped hole from the outside. This is because the groove in the bushing engages with the flat on the 'D'. Here's where it gets tricky; the tolerance is very tight between the groove and the thickness of the frame. Even though the bushing snaps into the 'D', it will not be centered enough to allow clearance for the guide tube. It's very important that the guide tube seats correctly or you will not get the E-clip on the end of the cross worm (figure 49).

So here's the trick: Snap the bushing into place in the 'D' hole. Then use a punch or screwdriver inserted into the bushing to push the groove onto the flat of the 'D'. You need to make certain the clearance around the circumference of the bushing is concentric and will allow for the guide tube to be inserted and seated. You will know when it's right. Be gentle with the frame at this point because the bushing is held in place by friction between the flat of the 'D' wedged into the groove of the bushing. If you knock the frame sharply against the bench-top the bushing may pop out and you will have to re-seat it.

Now put the line-guide (figure no. 2) on the guide tube (figure no. 50) and carefully insert it into the frame with the guide tube going around the bushing and into the frame. The notch on the end of the guide tube corresponds with the flat of the 'D'. If all is done correctly you will feel a slight but satisfying click as these parts fall into place. Now insert the cross worm from the opposite side and make certain that the end of the cross worm extends enough to fit the washer and E-clip on the end. At this point you can drop the pawl into the line guide and screw the cap on.

This assembly is a bit of a pain but it must be this way (exacting tolerances) to keep the parts accurately aligned, yet loose enough to function without causing additional mechanical friction during casting (because the line guide does not disengage for casting).

Thank you for the assistance Fred. Much appreciated!
-Mike

foakes

The Official, Un-Authorized Service and Restoration Center for quality vintage spinning reels.

D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

--------


"I have never been lost but I was bewildered once for three days." - American frontiersman, Daniel Boone.

PacRat

#36
I ended up putting an Ambassadeur handle on it. The lock screw hole on the handle is stripped. It didn't feel odd coming out. I was sad because it was the last part to go back on. I sort of like the Ambassadeur handle because it works well with my style of fishing where I'm almost never looking at the reel. Two knobs are harder to miss.

The centrifugal weights were missing so I tossed in a couple of the plastic ones from an Ambassadeur also. They look smaller than the DAM Quick weights but I'll give them a whirl.

I only had one left-over part and that was a small copper washer. It doesn't show on the schematic. I could find two places where it might fit. Either inside the cap that holds the pawl or under the screw that holds the gear sleeve. I chose the gear sleeve but either way it's easy to change without opening the reel.








Recoil Rob

#37
One more time!

I just (re)-discovered a 700 in my reel drawer that I had got at a tag seal 15-20 years ago. It's minty and I was thinking of loading it with 20# braid and using it a "guest" fluke/porgy/seabass rig.

  • Is it worth changing the drag to carbons?
  • Can the bushings be changed to bearings? Is it even worth doing?

Also the large button on the ride side prevents putting the reel into free spool, why? What's the meaning of the large and small white dots it moves between?


thanks,

Rob
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My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income.
   - Errol Flynn

Recoil Rob

#38
Found my answers in another thread except for washers. Worth changing to CF?
My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income.
   - Errol Flynn

foakes

I think that ball bearings can be installed in place of the bushing type bearings, Rob —-

CF can be installed if thin enough.

Neither one of these changes will improve the reel too much.

IMO, not worth it —- but that is up to you.  If you want to do the bearings —- I could check to see if it would work or not —- if you were serious about doing it.

As a matter of fact —- in some of these types of reels, bushings actually are more durable —- particularly in the salt.

White dots have been added by someone.  I guess as a reminder which direction to slide the free-spool lockout so that the thumb release cannot be activated by mistake.

Best, Fred
The Official, Un-Authorized Service and Restoration Center for quality vintage spinning reels.

D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

--------


"I have never been lost but I was bewildered once for three days." - American frontiersman, Daniel Boone.