alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Glow jig charging station ideas
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August 02, 2021, 06:27:14 AM *
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Author Topic: Glow jig charging station ideas  (Read 3831 times)
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gstours
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« Reply #45 on: May 13, 2021, 02:15:06 PM »

Thanks again for sharing your information everyone,  my test was to see also what the camera could pick up for light.    I,m not the brightest light 💡 on the block anyway!
   While I’ve been lucky enough to catch fish on glow stuff,  I’ve
 Fished right along some one who doesn’t and they might outperform me on the same day with the same bait, or scents.    My jury is still out,   I just don’t like wasting time while fishing 🎣 not fishing 🎣. Huh?
   It was only a test.🤗
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Benni3
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« Reply #46 on: June 09, 2021, 03:30:47 AM »

These things are on sale everywhere now,,,,,,, Wink and work pretty good too,,,,,,,,,,, Grin


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smnaguwa
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« Reply #47 on: June 09, 2021, 12:31:47 PM »

When using UV-C, please be aware. From the FDA website -

Risks: UVC lamps used for disinfection purposes may pose potential health and safety risks depending on the UVC wavelength, dose, and duration of radiation exposure. The risk may increase if the unit is not installed properly or used by untrained individuals.

Direct exposure of skin and eyes to UVC radiation from some UVC lamps may cause painful eye injury and burn-like skin reactions. Never look directly at a UVC lamp source, even briefly. If you have experienced an injury associated with using a UVC lamp, we encourage you to report it to the FDA.
Some UVC lamps generate ozone. Ozone inhalation can be irritating to the airway.
UVC can degrade certain materials, such as plastic, polymers, and dyed textile.
Some UVC lamps contain mercury. Because mercury is toxic even in small amounts, extreme caution is needed in cleaning a lamp that has broken and in disposing of the lamp.
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jurelometer
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« Reply #48 on: June 09, 2021, 07:37:02 PM »

When using UV-C, please be aware. From the FDA website -

Risks: UVC lamps used for disinfection purposes may pose potential health and safety risks depending on the UVC wavelength, dose, and duration of radiation exposure. The risk may increase if the unit is not installed properly or used by untrained individuals.

Direct exposure of skin and eyes to UVC radiation from some UVC lamps may cause painful eye injury and burn-like skin reactions. Never look directly at a UVC lamp source, even briefly. If you have experienced an injury associated with using a UVC lamp, we encourage you to report it to the FDA.
Some UVC lamps generate ozone. Ozone inhalation can be irritating to the airway.
UVC can degrade certain materials, such as plastic, polymers, and dyed textile.
Some UVC lamps contain mercury. Because mercury is toxic even in small amounts, extreme caution is needed in cleaning a lamp that has broken and in disposing of the lamp.

THIS!!!   ^^^^^

The marketplace is full of cheap UVC sterilizing products.  UVC is not something to be messed with, and I suspect that many (most?  all?) of these products have not gone through any rigorous testing.

If you have to decontaminate your phone, try a wipedown with isopropyl alcohol, available at any pharmacy and most supermarkets.  It will also clean the screen at the same time, and is less likely to damage the plastic.

All  UV light is not the same.  UV just means that the wave length (distance between each wave of light) is small enough to not be visible to the human eye, but not small enough to be categorized as x-rays. UV-A has the longest wavelength, is the most effective at charging glow paint, and is generally the least dangerous- it will still eventually lead to sunburn and cancer risk.  At increasing risk  comes UV-B, then UV-C, then a couple more levels before we end up at X-Rays.

UV-C lights will probably suck at charging your glow lure, but will be effective at damaging the paint job, and if any light leaks out will be a health risk.

I am just a science fanboy, not trained in this stuff.  Always a good idea to check out the official sources (like the FDA  reference from smnaguwa), and not to rely on advice  from random people in the Internet.

-J
« Last Edit: June 10, 2021, 05:42:46 AM by jurelometer » Logged
Bill B (Tarfu)
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« Reply #49 on: June 17, 2021, 02:10:55 AM »

When using UV-C, please be aware. From the FDA website -

Risks: UVC lamps used for disinfection purposes may pose potential health and safety risks depending on the UVC wavelength, dose, and duration of radiation exposure. The risk may increase if the unit is not installed properly or used by untrained individuals.

Direct exposure of skin and eyes to UVC radiation from some UVC lamps may cause painful eye injury and burn-like skin reactions. Never look directly at a UVC lamp source, even briefly. If you have experienced an injury associated with using a UVC lamp, we encourage you to report it to the FDA.
Some UVC lamps generate ozone. Ozone inhalation can be irritating to the airway.
UVC can degrade certain materials, such as plastic, polymers, and dyed textile.
Some UVC lamps contain mercury. Because mercury is toxic even in small amounts, extreme caution is needed in cleaning a lamp that has broken and in disposing of the lamp.

I can confirm this.  In my previous working life, I accompanied a DOJ forensic technician in the search of bodily fluids in a sex assault case.  UV lights were used to illuminate the areas in question.  With out the UV goggles, my eyes felt like they had a pound of sand dumped into each.  Yes I was warned, but had to “see” for myself…..Bill
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It may not be very productive,
but it's sure going to be interesting!
Crab Pot
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« Reply #50 on: July 08, 2021, 03:33:14 AM »

Here is what I use, nothing fancy-just a black light UV looking flashlight that I got off Amazon for less than $10.00.

I hold it right on my glow flat falls, two swipes each side and it's good for 2-3 drops.

Fits right in my pocket and works great.


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« Last Edit: July 08, 2021, 03:35:06 AM by Crab Pot » Logged
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