alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Assist cord recommendation
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September 18, 2021, 07:47:36 PM *
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Author Topic: Assist cord recommendation  (Read 1792 times)
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Brendan
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« on: July 24, 2021, 02:09:15 AM »

     I would like to hear some of your thoughts as far as type or brand recommendation. Thanks all for any input.
Tight lines, Brendan.
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Tiddlerbasher
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« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2021, 08:26:39 AM »

I have used hollow kevlar braid to good effect - even on toothy critters like pike
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Brendan
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2021, 04:11:06 PM »

     Thanks. 👍
Brendan.
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boon
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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2021, 10:38:37 PM »

BKK makes a nice light one. For heavier work, basically any kevlar braid is pretty good; it's all like 250lb+ breaking strain anyway.
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thorhammer
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« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2021, 11:46:46 PM »

i use leftover 150-200 power pro and snell it-works fine, or on occasion, hollow braid if I have time to splice. The PP has withstood many grouper and snapper chewing on it and rubbing on rocks, and keeps on.
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Swami805
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« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2021, 12:13:05 PM »

I have 200lb Jerry Brown hollow, will that work?
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jurelometer
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« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2021, 09:41:16 PM »

I have 200lb Jerry Brown hollow, will that work?

Maybe.  I am not a super dedicated vertical jigger, but I this it what I hav found so far:


 For my personal use in saltwater with  jigs from 1.5 to about 16 oz,  I use hollow spectra around 250 or  300  lbs for the smaller jigs, and Kevlar spearfishing cord (400 lb?) for jigs 4 oz and up.  Both get chewed up over time (spectra goes faster)  but usually hold well enough to last for dozens of  toothy fish.

Generally speaking, the whole idea behind assist hooks is a rigging that allows the hook to be pulled into the fish's mouth by the natural feeding method, which involves the fish generating a vacuum.  The jig is usually too heavy to move,  but if the assist cord is long and limp enough, the hook will get sucked right in (another reason not to decorate your assist hooks). 

Assist cord selection is a trade off between durability and limpness that will vary depending on what type of fishing you are doing.

1.  Kevlar is more abrasion resistant than GSP (AKA Spectra), but the Kevlar that  I have found so far tends to be stiffer.  Kevlar is much more easily damaged by UV, which will not be a problem unless you leave your jigs out in the sun all day over and over.

2.  Hollow braid (Kevlar or Spectra) is really nice, as you can form a loop by pulling the tag inside the main, and knot the doubled up braid to the hook for a nice clean slim connection.

3.  If you are fishing for something extra big and fast that is going to attack the jig like a linebacker, taking the whole mess deep in the mouth, limp assist cord may not matter so much, but losing a fish from abrasion on the assist cord is a risk.   Some of the guys going after big tuna don't use assist cord at all, just a swivel, chunk of wire,  or something to give the hook a bit of clearance.   Not my bag, so I cannot comment on this.

4. I find that assist cord selection makes more of a difference on the top of the jig.  I attribute this as a result of the fish doing a swim-by headshot bite,  as opposed to running down the jig for  a bottom first bite.

5.  It is a good idea to treat a rigged assist hook as a consumable that need to be monitored and replaced, just like any other leader rig.  If you are diligent here, you can go lighter.

YMMV

-J
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Brendan
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« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2021, 03:32:22 PM »

     After a little checking I have found several different core materials but I donít get how that matters if you remove the core to make loops as in a hollow scenario. I havenít figured out my preferred method yet.
Brendan.
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the rockfish ninja
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« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2021, 06:59:22 PM »

I've been tying my own assist hooks for the past 3 years and I ended up going with this.




It's hollow PE, so you can splice it, it's soft enough to tie easily, and stiff enough to keep your hooks from getting fouled while jigging. That's what I've found to be the comfort zone on this, too soft and your hooks wrap around terminal gear effecting hookups and jig movement, while stiffer Kevlar keeps your hooks outward getting more solid hookups, but a b!tch to tie and I've read exposure to the elements breaks it down and causes knot fail, although I've never experienced that.

I just wish it came in red so I don't have to use a magic marker. Grin
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« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2021, 08:56:41 PM »

     After a little checking I have found several different core materials but I donít get how that matters if you remove the core to make loops as in a hollow scenario. I havenít figured out my preferred method yet.
Brendan.

I thought that the solid core is added to make the cord stiffer (not stronger),  so if you leave a section of core between the loop and the hook, it should provide the intended benefit.  If the core material is thin enough, you should also be able to leave it in place for a splice, since the core is not fused to the inside of the braid.  I would think that the core makes the knots larger.

Haven't tried cored braid myself. If you give it a shot, please post your impressions.

As noted before, stiffer is not  necessarily better.  You can also make your own cored braid of desired stiffness by sliding some mono up inside hollow braid.



It's hollow PE, so you can splice it, it's soft enough to tie easily, and stiff enough to keep your hooks from getting fouled while jigging. That's what I've found to be the comfort zone on this, too soft and your hooks wrap around terminal gear effecting hookups and jig movement, while stiffer Kevlar keeps your hooks outward getting more solid hookups, but a b!tch to tie and I've read exposure to the elements breaks it down and causes knot fail, although I've never experienced that.


I find that braided PE leader tends to have a tighter weave.  Maybe that is what they are using for "assist hook braid"?

As noted before in this thread, you only  need to worry about extended UV exposure with Kevlar.  If you don't  store the jigs/cord with direct sun exposure, you shouldn't have a problem.   In my experience, Kevlar will last longer than PE due to the advantage in abrasion resistance. 

Agree that Kevlar does not knot as well, but I don't have any problems rigging hollow Kevlar using my preferred method for assist hook rigging:  spliced loop, a couple half hitches around the hook shank, thread wraps to lash the tag to the hook, and marine grade glue lined heat shrink.

Quote

I just wish it came in red so I don't have to use a magic marker. Grin



Red light waves will not reach the depths where you are catching rockfish. The absense  of light to reflect means that red will been seen as black.  Most fish at that depth cannot see red, which is why red and black are common colors  for deeper water fish.  Both do not reflect light from the surface, so evolution does not favor one over the other.
 
Strangely enough, some red rockfish species do have some ability to distinguish red.  The scientists speculate that this is probably used  for finding members of the same species for spawning.  If there is enough bioluminescence present and the two fish are close enough, it might help with matchmaking.  These species do not have much visual acuity, so finding the right partner(s) can get tricky.

So if the scientists are right, red cord might add to any romantic feelings a vermillion rockfish has for your jig, but with such a small amount of red surface area, even this seems unlikely.  If you forgot your red sharpie, black will probably have exactly the same effect.

I personally have zero preference in assist cord colors.  I do like clear shrink tube, so I can see if the hook is rusting underneath.

-J
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the rockfish ninja
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« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2021, 12:07:06 AM »


Red light waves will not reach the depths where you are catching rockfish. The absense  of light to reflect means that red will been seen as black.  Most fish at that depth cannot see red, which is why red and black are common colors  for deeper water fish.  Both do not reflect light from the surface, so evolution does not favor one over the other.
 
Strangely enough, some red rockfish species do have some ability to distinguish red.  The scientists speculate that this is probably used  for finding members of the same species for spawning.  If there is enough bioluminescence present and the two fish are close enough, it might help with matchmaking.  These species do not have much visual acuity, so finding the right partner(s) can get tricky.

So if the scientists are right, red cord might add to any romantic feelings a vermillion rockfish has for your jig, but with such a small amount of red surface area, even this seems unlikely.  If you forgot your red sharpie, black will probably have exactly the same effect.

I personally have zero preference in assist cord colors.  I do like clear shrink tube, so I can see if the hook is rusting underneath.

-J


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Deadly Sebastes assassin.
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