alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Powdercoated 71' 300
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
October 21, 2021, 02:31:17 PM *
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Author Topic: Powdercoated 71' 300  (Read 288 times)
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jgp12000
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« on: October 03, 2021, 12:11:08 PM »

I got this 300 at goodwill for $5,it was missing a lot of paint, AR spring, it needed a new bail spring,the bail was worn down to brass, and the spool was bent. It had a hard life, A good candidate for powder coating, I found a local 4x4 shop that said they would do it,I picked brassy gold from a sample. When I got it back it looked darker than the sample. It was the 1st reel the guy ever did  so it looks pretty good for $20.

I did have to run a tap through the bail screw holes, overlooked when they were plugging holes.They are 3.5mm x.6 threads, if you ever have to do this. I ran the tap from the inside out to clean the threads. Fred helped me out with a new bail/spring, AR dog/spring and Joe sent me a brand new spool in a case. It looks pretty good for a 50 year old reel. I found these taps on Amazon,you just have to be particular when using on aluminum. Thank you, Fred and Joe you made it happen again !


https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08Z3TVFSZ?psc=1&ref=ppx_yo2_dt_b_product_details


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« Last Edit: October 03, 2021, 01:05:59 PM by jgp12000 » Logged
foakes
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« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2021, 03:16:55 PM »

Looks great, James,

The Root Beer Express rides again!

Best, Fred
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D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

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oldmanjoe
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2021, 03:57:30 PM »

    Smiley   That looks good , I would like to try power coating some day .    Like you said , you have to plug all the holes ...
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foakes
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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2021, 04:19:01 PM »

   Smiley   That looks good , I would like to try power coating some day .    Like you said , you have to plug all the holes ...

I use these high-temp silicone plugs and sleeves.  They can be reused dozens of times, the paint just comes off afterwards, and the threaded holes of protruding bolt ends are free of any paint.  Just pop them out when you are done with the oven — done!

Best, Fred


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« Last Edit: October 03, 2021, 04:19:42 PM by foakes » Logged

The Official, Un-Authorized Service and Restoration Center for quality vintage spinning reels.

D-A-M Quick, Penn, Mitchell, and ABU/Zebco Cardinals

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You can keep knocking on doors that never open — or you can make your own door…and walk through it.

I’m not striving to be the guy with the most parts in the graveyard.
PacRat
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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2021, 04:47:54 PM »

Those silicone plugs look very useful. if you ever have a situation with an odd shaped cavity where a round plug won't fit, try red high-temp RTV. We use that when hot-dip galvanizing our fabricated assemblies. It cleans out pretty easy after being cooked.
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jurelometer
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« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2021, 07:35:28 PM »

Those silicone plugs look very useful. if you ever have a situation with an odd shaped cavity where a round plug won't fit, try red high-temp RTV. We use that when hot-dip galvanizing our fabricated assemblies. It cleans out pretty easy after being cooked.

That is a good idea!   And it always seems that I am a silicone plug or two short when powder coating a part with threaded holes.  Not quite  as efficient to clean out as as silicone plug, but better than chasing with a tap.  I  have broken taps trying to chase smaller threaded holes after a a multi coat finish. Blind holes are a real pain.

There is also high heat kapton tape that can be used for masking..  And you can  simply wipe off powder from unwanted areas before baking if you are careful.  The uncured powder is adhering just from static electricity if you are not cheating with hot-flocking.


Good color selection on the 300.  It looks like a period correct color that they might have chosen.

-J
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jgp12000
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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2021, 10:48:13 AM »

I was hoping it would be look like real gold but the powdercoater said it was a prismatic 2 part color that he had to do chrome then overlay the gold.I think maybe it is the darker aluminum may have caused the look, a more polished aluminum may have turned out brighter? Mitchell did make a silver and gold plated 300 in 71' not available to the public.

https://mitchell-collectors-international.org/articles_mitchellgold.html


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« Last Edit: October 04, 2021, 10:49:28 AM by jgp12000 » Logged
jurelometer
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2021, 07:21:30 PM »

I was hoping it would be look like real gold but the powdercoater said it was a prismatic 2 part color that he had to do chrome then overlay the gold.I think maybe it is the darker aluminum may have caused the look, a more polished aluminum may have turned out brighter? Mitchell did make a silver and gold plated 300 in 71' not available to the public.

https://mitchell-collectors-international.org/articles_mitchellgold.html

 I have used the Prismatic two /part system with a chrome base, and it is a bear to get just right for a chrome or gold plated look.  Anodized (matte) looks are easier.  I don't think that the underlying metal color is an issue.  The "chrome" base coat will completely block out the substrate, and the top  coat is basically a tinted clear coat that also provides UV protection.  If the topcoat has no tint, then  it is supposed to come out like chrome.  The cure schedules have to be just right though.  I have achieved a very chrome like base coat,  but the  closest  that II ever got to chrome after a top coat  was a  sort shiny pewter.  But the translucent  candy  coats over chrome are pretty spectacular.  WhenI I first joined here, I did a thread on this:

https://alantani.com/index.php?topic=9622.msg88315#msg88315

Prismatic keeps updating their chrome-like powder. I think that the newest is Superchrome II, which I have not tried. Presumably, the newest works better.

The common problem with chrome like base coats is under curing. In most cases, the base coat is supposed to only be baked to a partial cure, but the Superchrome is supposed to be baked all the way.  With a partial cure, the chrome looks great after the first bake, but turns more into a grey on the second bake with a topcoat.

BTW Those  cast aluminum spinners need a pre bake to leach out lubricants and then  a reclean. That cast aluminum is so porous that it will suck in  oils in over the years, but heat will drive some of it back out toward the surface.

Prebakes will eliminate most of the fish eyes in the finish.  A really aggressive sandblast of the part will eliminate scratches and provide a tooth for the paint to lock into.  The nice thing about powder is that while you need a consistent  surface to get a nice finish, there is no polishing or fine sanding required before painting. Polishing  the surface before coating will actually make the finish less durable, but not any smoother.

Just like anything else, powder coating takes some learning and practice, but it takes less skill to get a decent result, and is much less toxic than spray based liquids.  The finish is ridiculously tough, but not super hard.

BTW- I still like the color, even if it wasn't the target shade Smiley Interesting article On the  silver  and gold   300s.  Those must be purdy live and in the flesh.

-J


« Last Edit: October 04, 2021, 07:25:07 PM by jurelometer » Logged
jgp12000
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« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2021, 11:12:58 AM »

Good info, if I ever have another one done I may go for the chrome look.Your 2/0 Senator looks spectacular !

« Last Edit: October 05, 2021, 11:30:53 AM by jgp12000 » Logged
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