My thoughts on todays spinners

Started by Reeltyme, June 13, 2022, 11:31:52 PM

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Brewcrafter

Quote from: JasonGotaProblem on June 16, 2022, 10:34:25 AMWould it contribute to the discussion at all if I pretend to have my feathers ruffled? If so I can take one for the team.

Not too initially keen on the talk of the younger generations lacking the skills. I'm one of those young folks. But then my posts do a good job demonstrating that there's skills I definitely lack.

Jason - Sure you have the skills and the desire, as do many.  I hope I didn't make this sound generational.  I think Tommy wisely points out what makes the Ohana community special - we are all here because we are who we are and are dedicated to learning, sharing, and appreciation of well made things.  I would "almost" suggest that many of us are fisherman second, which is FINE.  :d   But when you scroll down on the home page to the Forum stats we have around 15K members (of various level of involvement - that is fine - I like that folks find this site and I am cool if they find it helpful but do not feel the need to be heavily involved).  But I am guessing that major manufacturers are not looking to sell 15K units; and to be honest we are probably NOT their target market on many items.  The AT Community is very special, but while it is (IMHO) the Greatest Brain Trust of Fishing Design and Development, I have to think that for the majority of what these businesses are creating we would not fall into their "target sales demographic". = - john

0119

Great topic can't believe I missed it from it's beginning. I'm just south of the o.p.  Penn is King here and only due to cheap price but Shimano is nearly on top. I have also seen quality go down but I think it started back a few years further. I'm not so sure is industry driven or societally driven. No one wants anything be it a cell phone, a car or a reel before they want the next best model. I used to think planned obsolescence in engineering was the fault of companies. But society is now obcessed with trends and trendy. Here it's to have at least 500,000 into a shiny tow vehicle with a color coordinated boat, motor and trailer. Even their shiny polyester sporty clothes matches. And in the rod racks, reels and rods that are color coordinated to match their braid. This year blue, next year orange. Nothing needs to last more than a season when it must be replaced after next ICast for one more added ball bearing and pink. It's all the fault of what passes as fishermen these days.

Squidder Bidder

Quote from: Brewcrafter on June 17, 2022, 01:24:52 AM
Quote from: JasonGotaProblem on June 16, 2022, 10:34:25 AMWould it contribute to the discussion at all if I pretend to have my feathers ruffled? If so I can take one for the team.

Not too initially keen on the talk of the younger generations lacking the skills. I'm one of those young folks. But then my posts do a good job demonstrating that there's skills I definitely lack.

Jason - Sure you have the skills and the desire, as do many.  I hope I didn't make this sound generational.  I think Tommy wisely points out what makes the Ohana community special - we are all here because we are who we are and are dedicated to learning, sharing, and appreciation of well made things.  I would "almost" suggest that many of us are fisherman second, which is FINE.  :d   But when you scroll down on the home page to the Forum stats we have around 15K members (of various level of involvement - that is fine - I like that folks find this site and I am cool if they find it helpful but do not feel the need to be heavily involved).  But I am guessing that major manufacturers are not looking to sell 15K units; and to be honest we are probably NOT their target market on many items.  The AT Community is very special, but while it is (IMHO) the Greatest Brain Trust of Fishing Design and Development, I have to think that for the majority of what these businesses are creating we would not fall into their "target sales demographic". = - john

The manufacturers probably have 2-3 target markets in mind. My guess is that there's an entry level market, an upmarket consumer, and a market for users who utilize the products commercially (e.g., charter operations).

There are plenty of people who use a rod and reel combo only 2 or 3 times a year. I don't know that with this light use maintenance is going to be necessary in the absence of something strange happening. It makes sense to have options in the market for these people. If the reel stops working after 3 or 4 years they'll probably just get the newer whizbang and throw the old one in the back of the shed.

But I have found that if you're even a heavy casual fisherman, one skill you're going to need is to maintain your equipment. Durability and readily available replacement parts is probably a non-negotiable for a heavy casual fisherman and the commercial operation. It's just that there are fewer of these users than there are of the 2-3 times a year types.

The advent of braid probably pushed materials science for fishing reels, where there was a lot of benefit in making a smaller, lighter reel which could nonetheless handle line with serious breaking strength. I have a 850SS laying around and it is absolutely mammoth for a spinning reel (I had matched it up with a surf rod). It's naturally cumbersome due to its size and weight, and if you could develop a reel with advanced materials that is smaller and lighter and could handle 65# braid you'd do it - it's just that the materials and engineering necessary to fit that kind of performance into a smaller, lighter reel make the whole affair much more expensive per unit. So the market here seems to have divided into real high end equipment and the lower end, entry level stuff which doesn't tale to repair as well.

Likewise, the upgraded frames for conventionals, and later the machined side plates and eventually the all aluminum higher end small conventional reels arose as the result of trying to push smaller, lighter reels to handle higher drag stresses without torquing the reel or stripping its main gear (or a dozen other things that could go wrong). Once braid becomes the standard, the consumer is going to want a smaller spool and a smaller reel but one which can handle serious stress - it seems to me as a non-engineer that the most direct way out of that problem is stronger, lighter materials which are bound to be more expensive.