alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial penn 209
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
October 18, 2019, 08:44:00 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 [9] 10   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: penn 209  (Read 219538 times)
0 Members and 9 Guests are viewing this topic.
foakes
Moderator
Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6064


Sierra National Forest


« Reply #120 on: September 19, 2017, 05:22:39 PM »

If you wanted to send them to me or someone else, that would be fine, if you are feeling a little uncomfortable.

(4) 209's would be $72 + parts + shipping -- for me.

Only parts I would foresee, would be new greased CFs -- Unless something really weird, I have enough parts in the bins to make them as new.

Might need a pawl or two, line guide, etc.

I would inspect the spools -- I would not replace them unless they needed replacement (doubtful) -- or if that is what you want.

PM me, if this is something you want to do.


So, for about $100 -- they would all ge ready to go.

If you bought a new Chinese 209 -- wholesale on those is about $60.

Best,

Fred
« Last Edit: September 19, 2017, 05:24:55 PM by foakes » Logged

Get a Good Night's Sleep -- Only (3) things happen after Midnight -- and none of them are good...


There are ten reasons to consider when choosing your next fishing reel.

The first is to pick a reel you like — The other nine reasons don’t matter.
Alto Mare
Moderator
Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12477


Southeastern Pennsylvania


« Reply #121 on: September 19, 2017, 05:30:40 PM »

Still working on the reel but while I was , I came up with a question.  Would it be worthwhile to try and have these reels serviced by someone?  The cost of doing so may be very close to what I can buy new ones for.  I hate replacing something if it can be used again but it may just make more sense. My research seems to be that it would cost close to $50.00 to service them.  I may be able to figure out how to do it on my own but since I am new to this, it may be some real trial and error. 
Try one on your own first, you shouldn't give up that easy. If you're really not able to put it back, there are a bunch of guys that could service them for you. Fred gave you a great price for all 4, but I still say try first.

Sal
Logged

Forget about all the reasons why something may not work. You only need to find one good reason why it will.
Bill B (Tarfu)
Fish Nutritionist II
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 3079


Crestline, CA


« Reply #122 on: September 19, 2017, 06:26:45 PM »

Jack, what Fred is offering is a great deal....however I would encourage you to take one of the working reels apart and do a service yourself...there are plenty of people here that can walk you through the service....once you are comfortable with that, then tackle a reel that is giving you problems....just do one at a time, starting with a working reel.  The 209 seems daunting at first, but if you can do that one, 95% of the Penn line up will be a piece of cake.  mysticparts.com is your go to for parts.  Here is a link to the tutorial by the Boss himself
http://alantani.com/index.php?topic=659.0

I find it helpful to have a camera handy and take lots of photos during the tear down to document part placement during reassembly.    Bill

P.S. Not sure where you are located but there may be a member close by that could help

"Edited as per Moderators to correct Scott's Bait & Tackle over to their new store name Mystic Reel Parts / www.mysticparts.com"


« Last Edit: July 13, 2018, 12:09:55 PM by mizmo67 » Logged

It may not be very productive,
but it's sure going to be interesting!
oc1
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 2567



« Reply #123 on: September 19, 2017, 11:48:52 PM »

Where's that description of how to hold the four bridge screws and the dog spring in place while rotating the bridge around until the pinion clicks into place.  That part takes hours to figure out on your own the first time.

When the 209 came out in the early 1950's it had the chrome plated brass spool.  The 109 had an even smaller chrome/brass spool beginning the early 1940's.  In the 50's you could buy #9, 109, 209 and later 309 with either chrome/brass or plastic spool.  I don't know when the aluminum spools showed up.  I had moved on by then.  There were frequent problems with plastic spools when monofilament became popular.  Monofilament stretches a lot but the individual strands do not compress so the pressure builds and builds as stretched line is packed under load.  The old braided nylon (squidding line) also stretches a lot but it did not blow up spools nearly as often as monofilament and the fact that the line can compress a little may have something to do with it.  The chrome/brass spools were thought to be nearly bullet proof compared to the plastic alternative.  Plastic was lighter and may have casted a little better.  But, none of these (109, #9, 209 or 309) cast very well because of all the moving parts and friction from the synchronized levelwind.

I'm swearing off all aluminum because it does not hold up.  When was the last time you saw a brass spool with little chips corroded off the edge of the flange?  You see it with aluminum spools all the time.  The old non-anodized aluminum is the worse but it happens with modern anodized aluminum reels as well.  If the anodizing is scratched or worn the aluminum will start to corrode below.  You cannot replace the anodizing so it is difficult to stop once it starts.  My dearly beloved Curado 70XG is dying of spool flange corrosion.

-steve
« Last Edit: September 19, 2017, 11:56:41 PM by oc1 » Logged
Decker
Moderator
Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1521


One fish, two fish, redfish, bluefish.


« Reply #124 on: September 20, 2017, 04:21:52 AM »

Where's that description of how to hold the four bridge screws and the dog spring in place while rotating the bridge around until the pinion clicks into place.  That part takes hours to figure out on your own the first time.

This video below from Scott's is a classic.  Helped me immensely my first time.  And don't forget the rubberband trick (earlier in this thread).  


I'm swearing off all aluminum because it does not hold up.  When was the last time you saw a brass spool with little chips corroded off the edge of the flange?  You see it with aluminum spools all the time.  The old non-anodized aluminum is the worse but it happens with modern anodized aluminum reels as well.  If the anodizing is scratched or worn the aluminum will start to corrode below.  You cannot replace the anodizing so it is difficult to stop once it starts.

Steve, I'm a relative newbie, and this is the first time I've heard this point of view on aluminum.   Going to have to keep an eye on those scratches.   Up to this point I've only seen very superficial ones that didn't seem at all threatening.  I don't live near salt water, and imagine that is a factor.  This topic deserves its own thread in the future. Wink /Joe
« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 04:34:07 AM by Decker » Logged
streetglider
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #125 on: September 20, 2017, 10:47:23 AM »

Thanks for the encouragement. I actually have a few weeks before I have to pull the boat and stop fishing. I've decided to keep trying to get the reel I am working on repaired and, if I am unable to, then take advantage of the offer to repair them I have been given here. I am lucky to have found this site and appreciate your help.
Logged
streetglider
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #126 on: September 21, 2017, 02:35:59 AM »

I took the advice of cleaning up a working reel and have a question about adjusting it. What does zero load and zero free play mean and how do I know when I have it?

Still cannot get the original reel to turn after installing the dog gear and spring and replacing the screws. I watched the video and everything seems like it should.
Logged
Decker
Moderator
Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1521


One fish, two fish, redfish, bluefish.


« Reply #127 on: September 21, 2017, 04:36:46 AM »

I'm not as experienced as the other guys who have responded here, but for me the biggest challenge was getting the bridge in place without the dog (or its spring) slipping out of place.  Also I remember at some point, I had the jack under the yoke.  Keep trying!   Once you get it, it will be like riding a bike.
Logged
Gfish
Gfish
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 2146


What? Me worry?


« Reply #128 on: September 21, 2017, 06:58:58 AM »

Streetglider, back in your 1st post you mentioned that -no matter how hard one of the boys was reeling it wouldn't bring in line. Was the handle turning? Sometimes braided line will slip on the spool if not attached to a good anchor at the bottom, such as tape or mono. line. This'ed probably be completly diffrent than the binding issue.
Gfish
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 10:12:40 PM by Gfish » Logged

Fishing tackle is an art form and all fish caught on the right tackle are"Gfish"!
streetglider
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #129 on: September 21, 2017, 11:30:08 AM »

Does the gear sleeve spin on the bridge assembly?  The handle was turning when they were reeling it in.
Logged
RowdyW
Firearms Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 2458



« Reply #130 on: September 21, 2017, 11:58:43 AM »

Yes the gear sleeve is supposed to turn freely on the ss bridge post. It is secured by a cross pin just below the threads on the sleeve. The pin fits snuggly but moves freely around with the sleeve. The inside of the sleeve is normaly greased or oiled. Grease will last longer but oil makes for longer casting.                Rudy
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 01:24:41 PM by RowdyW » Logged
streetglider
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #131 on: September 21, 2017, 06:30:20 PM »

With all of your help, I have managed to get the reel back together and functioning rather well. It took a lot of trial and error but thankfully, whenever I ran into an issue, I was able to ask questions here.  I will be replacing all of the drag washers this winter on all four of my Penn reels, and servicing them.  I will research anything else I should do at the same time. Thanks again.

Jack


* Penn 2OD.JPG (102.26 KB, 640x480 - viewed 142 times.)
Logged
mo65
The Freshwater Kid...Chillicothe, Ohio
Sensei
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3156


"This ship is filthy Mr. Christian!"


« Reply #132 on: September 21, 2017, 06:35:43 PM »

   Good work streetglider...glad it worked out. Cool
Logged

~YOU CAN TUNA GEETAR...BUT YOU CAN'T TUNA FEESH~

Tightlines666
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 4436



« Reply #133 on: September 21, 2017, 06:59:58 PM »

Well done!

Be careful, or before you know it, you will have your friends' reels on your bench too.

Wink
Logged

Hope springs eternal
for the consumate fishermen.
foakes
Moderator
Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6064


Sierra National Forest


« Reply #134 on: September 21, 2017, 09:34:39 PM »

Excellent work, Jack,

Best,

Fred
Logged

Get a Good Night's Sleep -- Only (3) things happen after Midnight -- and none of them are good...


There are ten reasons to consider when choosing your next fishing reel.

The first is to pick a reel you like — The other nine reasons don’t matter.
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 [9] 10   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.243 seconds with 16 queries.