alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Maintenance Info Enclosure
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Norcal Pescador
Redding, CA
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« on: March 19, 2013, 04:38:11 PM »

The first time I repair a reel for someone I enclose a sheet describing the basics of what I have learned about reels and what I recommend they do and don't do after they get it back. It gives them something they can refer to.
Feel free to use or modify it as you wish.


Maintenance Notes on Your Saltwater Reel

Spooling Your Line – Most spools are made from aluminum and a good coat of carnauba wax (or any good auto wax) will reduce or prevent corrosion on your spool. It is also good on the entire reel.

For any type line, you can use any knot to secure it to the reel spool. Don’t tie off to the pin. I use an “Arbor Knot.” The knot strength is not to keep you fighting a fish to the end of your line, but rather keeps the line attached to the reel in case your rig goes over the side. Even if in freespool, you’ll still be able to use a grappling hook to retrieve your investment.

http://www.netknots.com/html/fishing_knots.html
http://www.animatedknots.com/

Lubricants – The lubes I use are intended to reduce or eliminate corrosion from saltwater under normal use. All screws and interior metal parts were given a very light coat of Yamaha Marine Grease® to prevent saltwater from getting to the exposed metal. Ball bearings were also packed 100% with the marine grease to keep any water out of the bearings. The only exception would be spool bearings on reels used for casting where freespool is important or bushings. If this is the case, the bearing shields were removed, bearings thoroughly cleaned and blown dry, then lubed with no more than two drops of ReelX® reel oil and the shields left off.

Drag washers were lubed with Cal’s Reel and Drag Grease® for best performance, resulting in a smooth, jerk-free drag.

Over-lubing will cause a mess inside your reel and usually reduces performance. Do not ever use graphite in or on your reel. Graphite absorbs water and will form chunks (its natural form). WD-40® will turn to varnish with time.

Drag Washers – Where drag washers were replaced, either Penn HT-100® or Carbontex® carbon-fiber washers were installed. Carbon-fiber drag washers are far superior to paper, asbestos, or other materials found in drag systems.

After Fishing – If you do nothing else, RINSE YOUR REEL! Especially if you’re not going to fish with it again right away. Tighten down the drag to keep water from getting in the drag system. It doesn’t have to be ‘gorilla tight’, just snug. Rinse for at least 30 seconds with cool water from an open-ended garden hose (no nozzle) or your sink making sure the entire reel is cleaned off. Rubbing with a washcloth while rinsing is even better. Shake the reel to get most of the water out and set it aside to dry for a day or two. Shake it again then loosen the drag so the washers aren’t damaged.

Some anglers wipe their reel with a cloth and WD-40®, but I don’t. Sideplates can swell (resulting in damage) with the application of too much oil or repeated application of oils. I prefer to give sideplates a coat of Gel-Gloss®, or any polish made for fiberglass, plastics or autos. Polish the chrome with chrome polish, Brasso® or auto wax.


Rob
Global Moderator, Alan Tani Reel Repair  [http://alantani.com]

### End ###
« Last Edit: March 23, 2013, 05:54:59 PM by Norcal Pescador » Logged

Rob

Measure once, cut twice. Or is it the other way around? Roll Eyes

"A good man knows his limits." - Inspector Harry Callahan, SFPD
Dominick
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2013, 05:04:40 PM »

Good thinking Rob.  You're a good man, but I bet it does not matter.  If you get a reel that has not been taken care the next time you see it it will be in the same condition.  Dominick (the cynic)
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Leave the gun.  Take the cannolis.

 Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking beer.
erikpowell
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« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2013, 07:06:37 PM »

Great Idea Rob.... I will use that for my customers too. Thanks,
Although I agree with Dom... my preaching reel maintenance usually falls on deaf ears...
one particular friend/captain is actually serious when he says
"my maintenance consists of using it till it rusts then throwing it in the trash"
.... he'll never learn.. even after we tossed one of his tiagras  Grin
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Norcal Pescador
Redding, CA
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« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2013, 09:38:44 PM »

I only work on reels of people I know and most of them are pretty careful about their stuff. So if a reel is a mess, I give them a bit of an ear-bashing about it. If the reel comes back looking like it was buried in the sand after being dipped in crude oil, then I'll work on it AFTER THEY clean it.

Anyway it's still fun for me and I want to keep it that way. After all, I can start charging by the hour instead of a flat rate. Grin Wink
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Rob

Measure once, cut twice. Or is it the other way around? Roll Eyes

"A good man knows his limits." - Inspector Harry Callahan, SFPD
MuskyFishing
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« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2014, 04:25:59 PM »

The first time I repair a reel for someone I enclose a sheet describing the basics of what I have learned about reels and what I recommend they do and don't do after they get it back. It gives them something they can refer to.
Feel free to use or modify it as you wish.


Maintenance Notes on Your Saltwater Reel

Spooling Your Line – Most spools are made from aluminum and a good coat of carnauba wax (or any good auto wax) will reduce or prevent corrosion on your spool. It is also good on the entire reel.

For any type line, you can use any knot to secure it to the reel spool. Don’t tie off to the pin. I use an “Arbor Knot.” The knot strength is not to keep you fighting a fish to the end of your line, but rather keeps the line attached to the reel in case your rig goes over the side. Even if in freespool, you’ll still be able to use a grappling hook to retrieve your investment.

http://www.netknots.com/html/fishing_knots.html
http://www.animatedknots.com/

Lubricants – The lubes I use are intended to reduce or eliminate corrosion from saltwater under normal use. All screws and interior metal parts were given a very light coat of Yamaha Marine Grease® to prevent saltwater from getting to the exposed metal. Ball bearings were also packed 100% with the marine grease to keep any water out of the bearings. The only exception would be spool bearings on reels used for casting where freespool is important or bushings. If this is the case, the bearing shields were removed, bearings thoroughly cleaned and blown dry, then lubed with no more than two drops of ReelX® reel oil and the shields left off.

Drag washers were lubed with Cal’s Reel and Drag Grease® for best performance, resulting in a smooth, jerk-free drag.

Over-lubing will cause a mess inside your reel and usually reduces performance. Do not ever use graphite in or on your reel. Graphite absorbs water and will form chunks (its natural form). WD-40® will turn to varnish with time.

Drag Washers – Where drag washers were replaced, either Penn HT-100® or Carbontex® carbon-fiber washers were installed. Carbon-fiber drag washers are far superior to paper, asbestos, or other materials found in drag systems.

After Fishing – If you do nothing else, RINSE YOUR REEL! Especially if you’re not going to fish with it again right away. Tighten down the drag to keep water from getting in the drag system. It doesn’t have to be ‘gorilla tight’, just snug. Rinse for at least 30 seconds with cool water from an open-ended garden hose (no nozzle) or your sink making sure the entire reel is cleaned off. Rubbing with a washcloth while rinsing is even better. Shake the reel to get most of the water out and set it aside to dry for a day or two. Shake it again then loosen the drag so the washers aren’t damaged.

Some anglers wipe their reel with a cloth and WD-40®, but I don’t. Sideplates can swell (resulting in damage) with the application of too much oil or repeated application of oils. I prefer to give sideplates a coat of Gel-Gloss®, or any polish made for fiberglass, plastics or autos. Polish the chrome with chrome polish, Brasso® or auto wax.


Rob
Global Moderator, Alan Tani Reel Repair  [http://alantani.com]

### End ###


I'm A NEWBIE.
Now that being said.....    IMHO do NOT EVER use brasso.  I used to use that stuff when I was in Navy ROTC on the brass buckle. And that eats up metal like it was butter! 
 I have talked to a few LAPD officers when I used to volunteer in one station, And I was told the 'old guys' didn't know any better, and in less than a year their badges were almost smooth at the front from rubbing brasso on it every day.  Brasso is C--AP.
-But i'm a new guy to fishing, so maybe I don't know.
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A diver sees a man at 20 feet without SCUBA gear and watches him going down. 40...50..60...100...150...200  At 300 feet he catches up with the man, grabs his board and writes: "This is Amazing! How can you dive so far without breathing?" The man quickly takes the board and marker from him and writes: "I'M DROWNING YOU IDIOT!!!"
wothoyt
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« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2015, 08:42:29 PM »

Carnuba wax is also present in furniture polish.  The lemon in the polish is a mild acid and cuts fresh scale.  It's also easier to wipe down than car wax.

You guys absolutely, without fail need to find some "Bull Frog Rust Hunter".  Do some due diligence on the internet and find out why.  It cleans rust as well as a sonic bath but more importantly it permeates the the metal at a molecular level and prevents rust.  There are some real world, salt spray tests that are nothing less than amazing.  It also is a decent, light lube and smells good so you won't get chased outta the house by your better half.

The WD in WD-40 stands for water dispersant. The 40 was because it was the 40th formula.  It does dissolves caked grease nicely.  Yes it will leave a film.  No is does not lubricate well or for very long.  First time I saw the stuff, they gave it to us in Nam to hose down our weapons which rusted in five minutes without it.  There is a time and a place for WD-40 it's up to you to figure out when and where.  We used to spray down our dirt bikes with it before riding so the mud and dirt would just spray off.  Really pretty versatile stuff all in all..........

Back home after fishing I loop my line over a gate post and go for a long walk.  I use a clean wet sponge to pinch the line and wind it back on level and with proper tension.  You can't believe what the sponge looks like when you're done.

I also spray off my lures to keep the hooks from rusting.  I never try to cast a conventional after a truck ride and a boat ride.  You'll figure out why.

Don't forget the sunscreen.
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Bill B (Tarfu)
Fish Nutritionist II
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Crestline, CA


« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2016, 07:34:31 AM »

Good info thanks guys....Bill
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