alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial REEL FACTS
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Bryan Young
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« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2013, 02:11:04 PM »

A gear ratio can be determined by dividing the number of teeth in the main gear by the number of teeth in the pinion gear. The answer (quotient) is the ratio. This works for ALL gear sets.
I'm trying to wrap my head around this one.  For straight cut gears, I can see this, but for heliocut gears where you may have 3 or 4 gear teeth in contact...  Maybe I'm over thinking this thing.
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Cheesy I talk with every part I send out and each reel I repair so that they perform at the top of their game. Cheesy
RowdyW
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« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2013, 03:13:57 PM »

You are overthinking Bryan.   Grin Grin
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Norcal Pescador
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« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2013, 03:39:41 PM »

It doesn't matter Bryan. Think about the center or lead or last teeth to mesh. If you mark one tooth on the main and one on the pinion and count teeth, it will work whether straight, angled, or helical cut.

Try this: Fasten a main gear to a board and mark a tooth, any tooth. Now mark a tooth, any tooth on a pinion gear. Insert a drill bit or something into the pinion that the pinion will spin on easily. Now line up the dots on the gears and move the pinion around the main gear keeping the teeth meshing as you go. Count how many times the pinion made a complete revolution. It should equal the gear ratio based on the formula for gear ratios.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2013, 07:59:57 AM by Norcal Pescador » Logged

Rob

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« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2013, 09:51:30 PM »

for gear ratio,,
with the reel assembled,

make a mark on one side of the spool with a sharpie, greasepencil at a 12 o'clock position,, index the handle on something,, straight up 12' etc.. and roll the handle one revolution,, and count the number of times the "mark rolls by the index..

this will also give a rough estimation of gear ratio..
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Robert Janssen
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« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2013, 10:41:49 AM »

...move the pinion around the main gear keeping the teeth meshing as you go. Count how many times the pinion made a complete revolution. It should equal the gear ratio based on the formula for gear ratios.

Try that with a pair of quarters. Surprise!

(strangely, it doesn't work. The ratio between two identically sized wheels is undeniably 1:1. But when one orbits the static other, you'll find that it rotates twice.)

.
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nelz
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« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2013, 11:21:15 AM »

That's 'cause the moving coin has to make up for the lack of movement (rotation) of the other.  Grin
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« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2013, 07:59:10 AM »


Well harumph.  Undecided    Maybe it's a good thing I said try this. Roll Eyes
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Rob

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« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2013, 07:07:09 PM »

A gear ratio can be determined by dividing the number of teeth in the main gear by the number of teeth in the pinion gear. The answer (quotient) is the ratio. This works for ALL gear sets.
I'm trying to wrap my head around this one.  For straight cut gears, I can see this, but for heliocut gears where you may have 3 or 4 gear teeth in contact...  Maybe I'm over thinking this thing.

The gear ratio between 2 gears is determined by their respective diameters, and since the teeth have to be identical for the gears to mesh, their diameter is a function of the number of teeth. That's why you can just divide the number of teeth to get the ratio.
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jonathan.han
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« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2013, 08:58:57 PM »

Generally, any reel is only going to be as effective in catching fish as the person using it. "It's not the arrows, it's the indian." Of course, all the arrows we are referring to are serviced regularly.

Don't repair under the influence. The reel you kill could be your own. Don't drink and screw drive!

I respectfully disagree. A beer or two is fine. After three or eight, who wants to work on reels?
« Last Edit: July 14, 2013, 09:04:59 PM by jonathan.han » Logged

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Ron Jones
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« Reply #24 on: July 14, 2013, 09:11:54 PM »


The gear ratio between 2 gears is determined by their respective diameters, and since the teeth have to be identical for the gears to mesh, their diameter is a function of the number of teeth. That's why you can just divide the number of teeth to get the ratio.

I hear this from time to time on this sight and it just doesn't make sense. If I have 10 teeth on 1 5 inch gear and 5 teeth on 1 2.5 inch gear I have a 2:1 ratio, end of story. Admittedly the teeth would be HUGE to make that work but you get my drift.

If I have 10 teeth on 1 2.5 inch gear and 5 teeth on one 1 inch gear the ratio is, you guessed it, 2:1! Although from a design standpoint gear size for a given ratio is needed for proper function, diameter has no impact on ratio.

Ron
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Ronald Jones
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« Reply #25 on: July 15, 2013, 11:17:05 AM »

I respectfully disagree. A beer or two is fine. After three or eight, who wants to work on reels?

Ok, I must admit, I'm guilty of this myself. I need a drink just to muster up the courage to take apart that ol' Slammer LiveLiner! Actually, I find it makes my fingers a bit steadier for those tiny parts. But just one drink, or else!
« Last Edit: July 15, 2013, 11:17:37 AM by nelz » Logged
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« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2013, 02:34:58 PM »

In "DOG BEERS", I've only had one!! Grin
TomT
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Bob


« Reply #27 on: July 15, 2013, 02:57:47 PM »

In "DOG BEERS", I've only had one!! Grin
TomT


LOVE THIS Cheesy
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« Reply #28 on: July 15, 2013, 11:55:07 PM »


The gear ratio between 2 gears is determined by their respective diameters, and since the teeth have to be identical for the gears to mesh, their diameter is a function of the number of teeth. That's why you can just divide the number of teeth to get the ratio.

I hear this from time to time on this sight and it just doesn't make sense. If I have 10 teeth on 1 5 inch gear and 5 teeth on 1 2.5 inch gear I have a 2:1 ratio, end of story. Admittedly the teeth would be HUGE to make that work but you get my drift.

If I have 10 teeth on 1 2.5 inch gear and 5 teeth on one 1 inch gear the ratio is, you guessed it, 2:1! Although from a design standpoint gear size for a given ratio is needed for proper function, diameter has no impact on ratio.

Ron

Diameter does not have a direct effect on final gear ratio. It is the circumferences of each gear that is affected by diameter than changes gear ratio. But, you can't increase since most reels can't take a larger diameter gear. Increasing the diameter of a gear while maintaining the same pinion gear will give a higher gear ration. Decreasing dia. while keeping pinon size the same will decrease gear ratio.

For the gears to mesh correctly, the cut of each tooth is like thread pitch on a bolt, hole, or nut and they must be the same or they cannot mesh with one another. Therefore, the spacing between each tooth, just like thread pitch will be the same. In threads, you have "threads per inch". You count the threads since that is in reference to the length as if you were measuring in millimeters or inches. So, in a 1/4-20 bolt, we have 20 threads per inch. It's the same concept but the thread lays on the circumference of the gears. COUNT THE TEETH! It's a sure fire method; it's never wrong. NEVER (unless you use the wrong pinion gear-then it's FUBARed)
« Last Edit: July 16, 2013, 12:04:01 AM by jonathan.han » Logged

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« Reply #29 on: September 16, 2013, 06:29:56 PM »

Don't repair under the influence. The reel you kill could be your own. Don't drink and screw drive!

been there, done that.  never again
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