alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial sealine 400/450h
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Author Topic: sealine 400/450h  (Read 30617 times)
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alantani
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« on: December 07, 2008, 08:17:56 AM »

here's another diamond in the rough.

http://mikesreelrepair.com/schematics/schematic.php?url=Daiwa/Daiwa%20SL450H,%20450HW.pdf

and here's your reel.



let's start with the left side plate.  back out the three left side plate screw A's (key #2) and the two left side side plate screw B's (key #3) one at a time, grease the screw holes and re-install the screws.



now back out the three right side plate screw A's (key #48) and two right side plate screw B's (key #49). 



set them aside.



you now have a frame assembly (key #16), a spool (key #24) and right side plate assembly (key #36).



aluminum frames tend to corrode.  take an old toothbrush and spread the old grease around a little, then wipe off all the excess.



lube the left side plate bearing (key #13).



ok, the wing nuts have to go. 





you have a choice of replacing just the clamp nuts and bolts, or the entire clamp all together.  the bolts are penn part #34-35, the hex nuts are #149-200, the clamp nuts are 149-45, the bolt/hex nut/clamp nut kit is #34C-45, the penn clamp is #33-340, and the entire kit is called a 33-340sp kit.  these are all penn parts.



for this reel, we're going to replace everything but the clamp.  nice, huh!



install the spool (key #24) into the frame assembly (key #16) and set both aside.



now, for the right side plate.  remove the handle lock screw (key #61).



remove the handle screw (key #60).  a penn wrench works well here. 



remove the handle (key #59) and handle washer (key #58).



remove the star drag (key #57).



remove the tension springs (key #56).  note that they are cupped "()".



remove the three set plate screw A's (key #42) and the single set plate screw B (key #63).



the set plate assembly (key #25) will drop out as a unit.



here is an exploded view of the gear cluster. the stock daiwa drag washers will be replaced with a single penn ht-100 #6-855 and a set of five penn ht-100 #6-113h's.  the #6-113h drag washers are thinner that the stock daiwa drag washers and will be doubled up to maintain the proper height.



we will be very happy to be replacing these particle board drag washers with penn drag washers. 



slap a nice, thick, juice coat of cal's drag grease on the drag washers.  don't worry about the excess.  it will just squeeze out the sides.



rebuild the drag stack, including the spacing sleeve (key #55).



replace the set plate screws (key #'s 42 and 63), place two fingers over the screws and flip over the side plate (key #36).



lube the right side plate bearing (key #36).



carefully align the set plate assembly (key #25) onto the right side plate (key #36).



with a right hand assist, flip over the right side plate assembly (key #36) and tighten down the set plate screws (key #'s 42 and 63).



make sure the anti-reverse mechanism is functioning properly.



make sure the clutch lever (key #39) is functioning properly.



grease the screw holes on the right side of the frame (key #16).



install the harness lug (key #18) and hold it in place.



install the right side plate assembly (key #36).



install the right side plate screws (key #'s 48 and 49), long ones on the bottom!



adjust the spool adjusting cap (key #46) until there is zero load and zero freeplay.



give the spool a spin.  let's hope you don't have to replace any bearings.  they might not be easy to remove.



install the tension springs (key #56) in a "()" orientation.



install the star drag (key #57).  turn it down until it won't turn any more.  you should be clear of the shoulder of the set plate drive shaft and still be able to turn the star without banging into the spool adjusting cap (key #46).



install the handle washer (key #58).



at this point, we're going to install a new handle grip.  i'll drill out the back of the rivet for the old grip, then remove the grip and throw it away.  i'll need the arm only.



this is the latest prototype.  it has a 9 degree offset and is over an inch in diameter.  it is huge compared to the stock grip on the right.  i've had a few guys tell me that it looks too big.  my response has been that they are not catching big enough fish!



install the new handle (key #59) and handle screw (key #60).



install the handle lock screw (key #61).



done!



now, for a few comments......  the sealine 450H is a real diamond in the rough.  let's compare daiwa sealine 450h to the 4/0 penn 113hlw.  the spool size of the daiwa sealine 450h on the right hand side is about the same size as the wide spool 4/0 penn senator 113hlw. 



the drag range is also about the same.  with greased carbon fiber drag washers, the functional drag range for both reels is 10-20#'s with an absolute maximum drag of about 25#'s.  because of the risk of damage to the main gears, i would recommend keeping the drag below 20#'s.  once you change out the drags, the performance of the two reels is identical.  the main advantage of the daiwa sealine 450h is the aluminum frame.  a similar upgrade for the penn is $80 for the frame alone. the daiwa sealine 450h is available for $120, the penn 113hlw is available for $130.  with a $10 drag washer upgrade, you can have an all aluminum "4/0 wide" daiwa that will perform as well as a penn.  honestly, the performance of the two reels will be identical, but because of the all aluminum frame, i will vote for the daiwa sealine 450h to edge out the penn 113hlw as the best in its class. 

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send me an email at alantani@yahoo.com for questions!
basto
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« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2014, 03:40:39 PM »

The Daiwa also has a stainless dog,ratchet, jack and set plate.
Basto
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 05:34:36 PM by basto » Logged
Tom McKinney
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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2014, 07:08:05 PM »

I am really into the comparison between the sealine and 113h, mostly because I spent way to much on 113h parts lately.  If 20lbs is the max recommended drag for standard parts, what upgraded parts in the 113h allow you to safely go above this?  I am starting to wish for stainless sealine gear sleeves and gears so that this reel can achieve the same numbers as framed and souped up 113h.  Or maybe these numbers on the smaller, but spectra ready 350 or 300 sealines.

Now I have to go put that 113h gear sleeve I bought on a reel.

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floating doc
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« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2014, 07:20:43 PM »

I agree. I'd also like to see what the Sealine reels would do with stainless gears, sleeves, and double dogged. The consensus here is that the stock gears are quite robust.
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Central Florida
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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2015, 02:24:14 PM »

X10 for stainless gears/sleeves for 300-600h
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Ruffy
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« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2015, 03:55:05 PM »

How hard is it to get the bearings out of these?

Cheers,
Andrew
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Bryan Young
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« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2015, 03:59:18 PM »

How hard is it to get the bearings out of these?

Cheers,
Andrew

It's easier to just replace the bearing and cups. I have them in stock as well if you want me to send them along with your drag washer order.

Bryan
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Cheesy I talk with every part I send out and each reel I repair so that they perform at the top of their game. Cheesy
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« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2015, 04:08:31 PM »

I don't actually have the reel in hand yet... I saw it for sale on the other side of the country, my brother just happened to live in the next suburb though so he picked it up for $50. I am going to see him over Christmas and was hoping to rip into it then so it can stay with dad as a family beater for when us kids visit and we need extra reels. Was hoping to get all my ducks in a row so I can service it while I am there but if it has to be the cups and bearings then I might wait until I've seen it so it is not a wasted expense. Here's the reel for interests sake, looks a bit unloved but I am sure it will clean up.

http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/keperra/fishing/daiwa-sealine-series-400h-deep-sea-fishing-reel-in-original-box/1097895863
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Porthos
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« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2015, 05:19:26 PM »

I don't actually have the reel in hand yet... I saw it for sale on the other side of the country, my brother just happened to live in the next suburb though so he picked it up for $50. I am going to see him over Christmas and was hoping to rip into it then so it can stay with dad as a family beater for when us kids visit and we need extra reels. Was hoping to get all my ducks in a row so I can service it while I am there but if it has to be the cups and bearings then I might wait until I've seen it so it is not a wasted expense. Here's the reel for interests sake, looks a bit unloved but I am sure it will clean up.

http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/keperra/fishing/daiwa-sealine-series-400h-deep-sea-fishing-reel-in-original-box/1097895863


The second picture is the only one of concern given the white "stuff" on the spool...but, I've gotten Sealines in worse appearance, and they cleaned up fine with just corrosion only on the external surfaces of the chromed parts.
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Ruffy
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« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2015, 06:00:17 PM »

Yes, the old nail polish might be coming out to cover that up!
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sdlehr
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« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2015, 07:03:57 PM »

Yes, the old nail polish might be coming out to cover that up!
OK, what's the nail polish for? I looked at all the pics, I think the spool looks pretty good. I don't see any oxidation. But nonetheless, what do you plan to do with nail polish? And if I'm missing something on the spool please let me know if you think I'm wrong.
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Sid Lehr
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« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2015, 08:08:35 PM »

If there is any corrosion on the spool. I won't know until I get the reel and get the line off but if it is corrosion then I'll clean it up before using clear nail lacquer to seal it. Then re-spool and go fishing!
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sdlehr
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« Reply #12 on: December 16, 2015, 06:56:01 AM »

Thanks. Would you also use nail polish on a chromed spool for the same purpose, or will things like Never-Dull take care of the same problem?
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Sid Lehr
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« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2015, 12:42:56 PM »

Nail laquer clear coat will seal against further intrusion / exposure on the damaged surface. after removing as much crud as possible and steel wooling, I flush with DI water and dry before coating, otherwise you are sealing in salts. I then use a paste wax like Mother's automotive on the spool before line up. Never dull is fantastic stuff but isnt really permanent in terms of sealing the surface.

see below penn spool i did the other day; the lacquer is automotive for color match but same approach  applies.


* 006.JPG (1927.28 KB, 3264x2448 - viewed 369 times.)

* 037.JPG (3280.84 KB, 3264x2448 - viewed 432 times.)
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sdlehr
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« Reply #14 on: December 17, 2015, 08:21:39 PM »

I got my wife to donate some clear lacquer nail polish, but I'm wondering if Flex-Coat or something similar might be more durable and effective. It might not want to stick to the polished chrome surface adjacent to the areas were the chrome plating is gone, but as long as it stays where it needs to and prevents further oxidation of the parts of the spool devoid of chrome plating it'll serve its purpose. If I could figure a way to rotate the spool in the rod dryer (shouldn't be too difficult) I might give it a try. I didn't like the way the nail lacquer went on.... it might need to be thinned with some acetone to go on more smoothly (I was suspicious when my wife donated it to my workbench, maybe it no longer is usable for her (she's already asleep, I can't ask), but I'm more accustomed to working with flex-coat than clear nail polish (and I'm quite glad of that!)  Grin
« Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 08:26:38 PM by sdlehr » Logged

Sid Lehr
Veterinarian, fishing enthusiast, custom rod builder, reel collector
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