alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial If you ever wondered what a lighting strike does to a fishing rod.....
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Author Topic: If you ever wondered what a lighting strike does to a fishing rod.....  (Read 7785 times)
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mizmo67
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« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2017, 07:50:59 PM »

At least the Shimano Tranx is still in 100% condition, bomb proof!

I dunno...heat may have fused things
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« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2017, 05:42:35 AM »

At least the Shimano Tranx is still in 100% condition, bomb proof!

I dunno...heat may have fused things
Fuzzed things and fused things Grin Grin
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Cornelis
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One fish, two fish, redfish, bluefish.


« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2017, 12:24:12 PM »

I wonder if the conductivity of carbon fiber makes it more attractive to lightning.
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boon
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« Reply #18 on: July 31, 2017, 02:35:39 AM »

I wonder if the conductivity of carbon fiber makes it more attractive to lightning.

Absolutely; they act like a small lightning rod (no pun intended)

Most of my high-graphite rods have a sticker on them warning that they are conductive.
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foakes
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« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2017, 02:56:46 AM »

Fishing solo one time up at Huntington Lake in the Sierras -- mid spring at 7000' -- late afternoon.

Ice had been off the lake for a week or two

Clounds rolled in just like dense fog -- fish were biting, so I kept fishing.

Snowed 3" in about 30 minutes -- dead calm -- no wind.

Pretty soon, I heard close thunder.

Still kept fishing --

All of the sudden I could not see my line where it should have entered the water.

As my hair started to tingle with static electricity -- and I found my line arched up 20' above the water in a big arc -- I immediately tossed the rod and reel on the snow bank -- cut the line -- packed up and went home.

That was 37 years ago -- and possibly why I am still sucking air today.

Best,

Fred
« Last Edit: July 31, 2017, 03:01:30 AM by foakes » Logged

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« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2017, 01:06:03 PM »

Been there, done that. Fish going crazy just before a storm...make a long cast and find myself staring stupidly at my fishing line just hanging in the air like it was part of the movie The Matrix. Quickly called it quits.
Saw a video on line a while back that some bass fishermen took of sparks arching between the pile of rods they had on deck.
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« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2017, 01:19:05 PM »

Wow, this is interesting.  The floating fishing line is an indicator that the air is electrically charged?  Makes me think of using a glass rod.
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PacRat
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« Reply #22 on: July 31, 2017, 02:21:39 PM »

The floating line phenomenon is fascinating. I'm curious if it is because the line is attracted to the atmosphere (storm cloud) or if it is repelled by the earth? This is some very interesting stuff! This reminds me of that old science experiment where you bend running water with a static charged comb. I have access to an atmospheric physicist and I will discuss this at my first opportunity.
-Mike

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sdlehr
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« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2017, 02:48:15 PM »

I'd bet dollars to donuts that the static charge on the line is what drew it up into the air, just as one's hair stands on end in the same situation.... until the lightning discharge neutralizes the potential difference. They say the direction of lightning movement is from ground up anyway, even though it never looks like that. So I think that means that the electrons (negative charge) are attracted by an atmospheric positive charge and the difference in potential between the two peaks at the moment of lightning strike.
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Sid Lehr
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« Reply #24 on: July 31, 2017, 03:07:00 PM »

Yes, carbon fiber and graphite are very conductive. I've installed carbon fiber static drains on fiberglass oil storage tanks. The static drains were long 3/8" x 4" x 15'  slats that were suspended vertically inside the tank to remove the static charge from the product.

When thinking of a lightning event  (event = a single lightning strike), we need to consider absolutely everything to be conductive...some things are just more (or less) conductive than others. Everything will take on a charge during a storm. This happens at a slow rate as the storm intensifies and everything takes on a more-or-less equal charge on the front end of the event as this is a relatively slow rise. During a lightning event all these charged bodies are seeking balance or equilibrium very quickly. More conductive bodies will experience more current. (Remember it's just 'static electricity' or 'potential' until lightning strikes then the static build-up becomes current, a lot of current, for an instant during the discharge while things nullify or balance out). You do not want your body to be a current path. Understand that this current is on/in whatever you are standing on (or sitting or touching). If your body is more conductive than the soil that you are standing on you will become part of the current path, even without being struck directly.
 
Digressing back to the floating lines...this reminds me of Franklin's kite but with both ends at 'earth potential' and the floating line in the middle is a very good indicator of a very strong electrostatic field.

Stay safe guys. You don't need to get struck directly to be seriously injured. Think of a lightning event as a very random competition with a multitude of variables. If I can find a good link to some reliable lightning safety suggestions I'll share it here. Most of us now have cell phones and you can get weather apps with lightning data and alarms. Get one and use it! Also, don't forget to track flashes. Sound travels at about 5 seconds per mile. A good rule of thumb is to seek shelter when lightning is within 5 miles. A vehicle is about as good as it gets...and avoid contact with metal.
-Mike
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kmstorm64
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« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2019, 08:53:01 PM »

Lightning is no joke, Worked a patient years ago in a Trauma Center in Florida who was struck by lightning while fishing, took him out and zapped the crap out of his partner/GF.  She lived but was pretty messed up.
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« Reply #26 on: May 15, 2019, 12:27:51 AM »

Time to change the skivvies Smiley Smiley.

Joe
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