alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Question on wood-handled rods
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Decker
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« on: August 10, 2017, 09:06:53 AM »

I grew up fishing with wood-handled rods and know little about rod building. Do wood-handled rods have the blank running under the wood and reel seat?   I recently saw an old conventional rod in an antique shop that had the fiberglass blank running all the way to the butt, and it seemed unusual for a rod its age (probably about 50 years). 
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thorhammer
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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2017, 09:58:24 AM »

depends....some do, but many of those old rods were built two piece with ferrule into the reel seat.
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oc1
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« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2017, 12:31:41 PM »

I've never seen one with the blank running all the way through the handle.  Like John said, most only go to the reel seat.

Hardwood boat rod handles first appeared on split bamboo rods and continued into the era of solid fiberglass rods.  You do not see too many hardwood handles with hollow fiberglass blanks.  Part of the reason wood handles became so popular is that the hardwood (often oak) is heavy.  The heavy handle helps to bring the balance point of the rod back toward the reel seat making the rod more comfortable to fish with.  Hollow blanks can be made with better weight distribution so the hardwood handles became less popular and rods with the blank going all the way to the butt with cork handles began to take over.
-steve
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Cor
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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2017, 09:33:33 PM »

I've never seen one with the blank running all the way through the handle.  Like John said, most only go to the reel seat.

Hardwood boat rod handles first appeared on split bamboo rods and continued into the era of solid fiberglass rods.  You do not see too many hardwood handles with hollow fiberglass blanks.  Part of the reason wood handles became so popular is that the hardwood (often oak) is heavy.  The heavy handle helps to bring the balance point of the rod back toward the reel seat making the rod more comfortable to fish with.  Hollow blanks can be made with better weight distribution so the hardwood handles became less popular and rods with the blank going all the way to the butt with cork handles began to take over.
-steve
Not intended as a hijack, but just a comment to add to what Steve is saying.

In S.A. we fish with a conventional reel fitted at the rear of the rod which creates a rod with superior balance and comfort, as well as casting ability.     Some of my friends in other parts of the world could never understand that.
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2017, 10:56:26 PM »

I understand you Cor, but get there with the reel on top and lead in the butt.  The balance point on the rod is under the spool.
-steve
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Cor
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« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2017, 04:38:55 AM »

I understand you Cor, but get there with the reel on top and lead in the butt.  The balance point on the rod is under the spool.
-steve
Yes is true, but by adding lead the whole rig is heavier.   By moving the reel down you move the point of balance backwards, without adding the extra weight.

I have recently spent a lot of money to reduce the overall weight of my tackle as my body is no longer willing to work with the heavy stuff. Huh? Huh?
I often stand casting a 11ft rod and 3 1/2 oz lure for hours at a time.
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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2017, 04:43:46 AM »

Thanks for sharing your knowledge Steve and Cor.  

I haven't had a wood-handled rod in a long time, but remember the pleasant weight of that oak for boat fishing.  When I recently saw an old fiberglass rod for sale, it seemed strange not to have the wood handle.  It didn't occur to me to try to determine if it is solid or hollow.  

I do enjoy watching different casting methods demonstrated on youtube,and vaguely recall seeing something like Cor described.
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Cor
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« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2017, 05:23:47 AM »

This rod was never a great success as a casting rod, but just to show how I cast.
 


* vlcsnap-2013-08-13-09h58m50s219.png.jpg (213.81 KB, 1024x576 - viewed 106 times.)
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« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2017, 08:50:51 AM »

This came from a 2008 catalog of a long gone supplier. These butts were matched with Lakeland seats. Still see many of these on the headboats in New England. I remember when my dad in Florida got his 1st solid glass rod. He went around to many shops until he found a rod that went thru the handle. I do think that rod is down in the cellar somewhere.

Dave



* woodbutt.jpg (309.35 KB, 746x1254 - viewed 90 times.)
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« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2017, 09:48:35 AM »

Yes they are made through the butt sometimes. Most are ferruled into the reel seat.
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« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2017, 09:56:41 AM »

This came from a 2008 catalog of a long gone supplier. These butts were matched with Lakeland seats. Still see many of these on the headboats in New England. I remember when my dad in Florida got his 1st solid glass rod. He went around to many shops until he found a rod that went thru the handle. I do think that rod is down in the cellar somewhere.

Dave



Very informative, Dave, thanks.  /Joe
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« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2017, 10:26:52 AM »

I feel your pain Cor.  I'm using eleven foot bamboo cane rods that tend to be tip heavy anyway.  Often have to add five or six ounces to the butt of a 19 inch handle to get it to balance at the reel seat. It makes the rod much heavier, but it still feels lighter and less fatiguing for repetitive casting.  

I'm casting 1/4 to 3/8 ounce jigs from a sitting position three inches above the water line in a canoe cockpit.  The lower reel position won't work because I need the left hand to be leveling  line on the spool as the right hand cranks.  With levelwind multipliers or spinning gear it would work out better.  Everyone should give the low reel position try because it works out really well in some situations.

The balance issue played an important role in the design of traditional New England-style surf casting rods.  They often had (and still have) 27 inch handle lengths which means the handle had to be tucked under the arm when retrieving and the butt had to be stuck in the crotch or between the legs when fighting a fish.  It's not the most graceful setup.  But the long handle helped pull the balance point back toward the reel so the left wrist didn't have to support as much tip weight.  Overall weight is one thing, but what will really get to you is the tip imbalance.  The overall weight is supported with large muscles in the arm.  But the tip imbalance is supported by small muscles and tendons in the wrist.  Besides relieving strain on the wrist, balance increases sensitivity.
-steve
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« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2017, 11:11:03 AM »

The balance issue played an important role in the design of traditional New England-style surf casting rods.  They often had (and still have) 27 inch handle lengths which means the handle had to be tucked under the arm when retrieving and the butt had to be stuck in the crotch or between the legs when fighting a fish.  It's not the most graceful setup.  But the long handle helped pull the balance point back toward the reel so the left wrist didn't have to support as much tip weight.  Overall weight is one thing, but what will really get to you is the tip imbalance.  The overall weight is supported with large muscles in the arm.  But the tip imbalance is supported by small muscles and tendons in the wrist.  Besides relieving strain on the wrist, balance increases sensitivity.
-steve

A lot of surf-casters will put the rod between their legs for popping surface plugs.  I've considered using a light fighting belt for holding the rod while fishing bait and standing in the surf.  Going forward I'll pay more attention to the tip balance, especially knowing that it increases bite sensitivity.  Great stuff, Steve. 
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« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2017, 04:39:28 PM »

Joe

I have a few Wood Butt boat rods that I am going to cut up maybe 6 pcs. if your coming my way they are yours. I'm by JFK Airport or I might have to go to O C N J next month but this is not a fun trip.

Mike
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« Reply #14 on: August 11, 2017, 08:59:52 PM »

Mike, thanks for the offer.  What are the lengths?  Are any 7 ft. or more?
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