alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial anatomy of a stand-up rod
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
October 18, 2019, 09:08:31 PM *
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Author Topic: anatomy of a stand-up rod  (Read 3634 times)
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Swami805
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« on: November 22, 2017, 07:04:02 PM »

Thought I'd post this as my take on a stand-up rod,harness and plates.
The rod- normally 5'-6" to 6'-6", there may be a need for something longer for beach fishing but a long rod gives the fish a leverage advantage.
The length of the lower handle from the end of the gimbal to the center of the reel sleeve in general should be the distance from the tip of your elbow to the center of your palm,
The fore grip usually is between 14"-18" depending on the length of your arm. If your pulling on the blank the handle is too short. Good way for your fingers to cramp up.
The first guide should be tall enough so the line won't touch the grip, subsequent guides should keep line line off the blank when the rod is fully loaded.
Harness-- the best ones iv'e seen and most widely used  are nylon straps or webbing, 1 around the waist, thru the inner thighs, 2 to hang the plate on and 2 that connect to the lugs on the reel. All should have a long range of adjustment. Nothing wrong  with other styles just these are not very bulky.
Fit the belt snugly around the waist and thru the inner thighs so it can't slip in any direction.
Plate-- find one the fits right with your legs lightly spread so you feel balanced. Hang it on the clips so it feels like the load is spread evenly over the entire area and not digging in anywhere.
Reel hooks- use hooks to hang the reel thru the lugs. Any kind of snap is almost impossible to unclip with one hand with a load on the reel. With the rod in the gimbal adjust the straps so the rod is at about a 45% angle. Any lower and the fish is wining.
Now that you're all harnessed in tie the line off and pull. You should be leaning back, not using your back. The reel should be a comfortable distance for cranking with your free hand at your side or resting on the reel. Grab the fore grip and lift and see how that feels. Fine tune the various straps to find the most comfortable set up. This also a good time to set your drag with a drag scale.
As for blanks different brands are personal preference or just what's available. Usually the line rating is a range, somewhere in the middle of the range is about right. It gets confusing when 1 rod company will have blanks that are  the same length and the same rating. IF possible go pull on them to see what you like best, it's very subjective.
Absolutely nothing wrong with buying rods online,but the better the fit you the better they will perform.
Being on a big fish for a few hours whether on a boat or on shore can be the thrill of a lifetime or a beat down of epic proportions. Being prepared with every part of your tackle in tip top condition adjusted to perfection will give you the best possible chance of success.
Feel free to drop me a PM, I'm not here trying to pimp anything, just trying to be helpful.
I've built rods here for many years for a local shop, a large percentage for long range fisherman.
As usual it's just my opinion, I could be wrong.
Sheridan
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« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2017, 12:24:37 AM »

Sheridan,
You are definitely onto something.
I know too many guys that thought they were prepared, until they caught a huge fish.
Improper alignment of the reel with the hands and a cheap fighting plate and harness will make you feel like you were beat with a rubber hose the next day. Ask me how I know. Roll Eyes
My Harness is only a Maxforce by Aftco.
I prefer a Stuart Short #4 Butt., We can talk about a build for a 20/0 Everol Rod after the Holidays. Wink
I need another rod for all my butts.
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redsetta
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« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2017, 10:57:59 AM »

This is great, thanks Sheridan
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Bill B (Tarfu)
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« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2017, 01:36:20 PM »

very good information.  I will be rebuilding a rod that fits that description and this will be a big help.   Bill
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« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2018, 06:33:32 PM »

One thing I'd add for a stand up rod is if you're using a harness you should not be touching the handle, at all! Your free hand should be on the reel, pushing on it as you sit back in the harness to gain line and laying line as you reel down on the fish. People that pull on the rod quickly find out just how easy it is to cramp up, throw anhio out of place or just plain get tired holding that position. You should be comfortable in the harness, it's like a swing and it's there to hold all the pressure. Also, lifting with your hands often leads to high sticking and if the line breaks or hook pulls that rod is going right into your face.


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Shark Hunter
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« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2018, 06:44:50 PM »

You got it Chris.
You need your non winding hand to lever the line.
The only time I grab the rod with my left is to take a break, because he is peeling line or we are at a stand still of a grueling fight.
I wish that time was now! Wink
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Rivverrat
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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2018, 11:08:51 PM »

Yup some good thoughts... Jeff
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Reel Beaker
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« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2019, 08:16:18 AM »


The rod- normally 5'-6" to 6'-6", there may be a need for something longer for beach fishing but a long rod gives the fish a leverage advantage.


Why does a long rod give the fish a leverage advantage?

Anyone care to explain why.

Thanks.
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sdlehr
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« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2019, 09:17:29 AM »


The rod- normally 5'-6" to 6'-6", there may be a need for something longer for beach fishing but a long rod gives the fish a leverage advantage.

Why does a long rod give the fish a leverage advantage?

Anyone care to explain why.

Thanks.
Not sure I'd agree with the wording, but a longer rod is a longer lever arm and transmits more (rotational) force to the operator. It also is a shock-absorber, preventing line breakage, which absorbs some of that force.
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Sid Lehr
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« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2019, 09:51:40 AM »

A 12' rod will give the FISH twice (approx) the levereage of a 6' rod - simple maths about levers. Reel/mount position and power curve/flex can be very personal. BUT, in general, a shorter rod will give YOU more leverage on your fish, which in a power battle you need. Longer rods have their place but give less leverage.
All of my rods (except surf rods) that I've made/purchased over the last 10 years have been shorter, even the fly rods (more for convenience).

Does that help or cloud the issue?
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steelfish
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« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2019, 10:38:07 AM »


As usual it's just my opinion, I could be wrong.
Sheridan

"just your opinion" amigo, but supported by many years of experience, so that counts a lot, its more an advice than opinion in my books.
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MarkT
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« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2019, 10:44:30 AM »


Why does a long rod give the fish a leverage advantage?

Anyone care to explain why.

Thanks.

To paraphrase an old saying... give me a long enough lever and a place to stand and I'll move the world.  Well, with a long rod the fish has the leverage and you're the one who's going to get moved!
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« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2019, 10:48:24 AM »

Exactly Roll Eyes
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Alto Mare
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« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2019, 11:58:03 AM »

Personal field test is always best on anything!

Sal
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