alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Spinning reel decisions. Vintage vs New
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
December 08, 2019, 06:25:10 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Spinning reel decisions. Vintage vs New  (Read 4088 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
handi2
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 3425


OCD Reel Service and Repair


« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2018, 01:15:48 PM »

Your new reel may already have carbon drags. Many of them are now using them. I know Daiwa is using carbon drags in most of their spinning reels.
Logged

OCD Reel Service & Repair
Gulf Breeze, FL
Reel 224
Jersey Devil
Firearms Group
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 3836


New Jersey


« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2018, 01:55:11 PM »

Why Diawa?
The only reason I say Daiwa is for their new BG (Black Gold) Reels.
The name is just borrowed from the original Black Gold from the 80's.
They are packed with features that a lot of high end reels have at a very affordable price.
http://www.alanhawk.com/reviews/bg16.html

I agree!

Joe
Logged

"I don't know the key to success,but the key to failure is trying to please everyone."
festus
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 1231



« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2018, 02:06:02 PM »

. Hope to catch some Dolly Varden today.

Why Diawa? Well, when I was a kid I bout a Diawa Gold spincast rod that served me well with tons of blue gill and a few bass in East Tennessee. I kept that old thing until it simply wouldn’t work. Now, my son’s 9 year birthday is next week and he has one coming his way.
I remember those gold Daiwa spincasters, there were also some good looking gold Daiwa ultralight spinning reels.

BTW, we have a few species of fish in some of these deep mountain lakes in East Tennessee that have been stocked since we were kids.  Lake trout, coho salmon, kokanee, and a few cutthroat trout.  Brook trout have been introduced into the Clinch River below Norris Dam and surprisingly a few have migrated into Watts Bar Lake at the tailwaters of Melton Hill Dam.

Years ago a fellow who owned a greenhouse in Roane County told me he'd been out Oregon way, maybe Washington and caught gobs of Dolly Parton trout.  Cheesy
« Last Edit: May 27, 2018, 02:09:17 PM by festus » Logged
Gfish
Gfish
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2204


What? Me worry?


« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2018, 05:22:37 PM »

I bought a Diawa Gold Spincaster a few years ago just to remind me of my childhood fishing experiences. A nice reel, with an oscillating spool system.
Logged

Fishing tackle is an art form and all fish caught on the right tackle are"Gfish"!
sharkman
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 514


« Reply #34 on: May 29, 2018, 03:07:51 AM »

Environment plays a big role. The looks and features of the new reels are hard to resist. I surf fish every weekend and the old penn ss and z series seem to hold up the best.
Logged
El Guapo
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 22


« Reply #35 on: May 29, 2018, 12:32:33 PM »

Hi.. im not one who fishes spinning reels a lot but due to me loosing my spinning reel a while back i did a bit of research and bought myself the Shimano Nasci c5000xg.. has a Hagane Gear as well as X-Ship or few seals in important places.. i call it the poor mans Stella lol as a few features from Shimano's top of the range reels filtered down to this budget reel.. the reel itself has a cross carbon drag ( don't think its ht-100 ) in the 5k size and not sure of the smaller sizes and super smooth.. line lay out the box without adding or removing any washers was good and had a few casts while fishing and smooth in the cast and retrieve.. did not catch anything yet and winter locally but looking forward to the beginning of fishing trips from end June / July onwards.

very easy on the eye too.. only problem is the handle which is not one piece but some tic after every trip should take care of that

Logged
Shark Hunter
Moderator
Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 11189


The Rogue of the Seven Seas!


« Reply #36 on: May 29, 2018, 09:08:09 PM »

New BG 8000 arrived today. I like the lines of it. For $104 out the door, I like it. Wink
This reel means business. Oversize Gears and New Features that only come on reels 5 times the price.
BG on the Left, Fin Nor Lethal 100 on the right and a Battle 2 8000 in the Back.
My SS and Z Series are always in the line up too.
I really like the Black and Gold. Reminds me of one my favorites.




* IMG_4152.JPG (1871.5 KB, 2272x1704 - viewed 79 times.)

* IMG_4153.JPG (1869.89 KB, 2272x1704 - viewed 144 times.)
« Last Edit: May 29, 2018, 09:10:39 PM by Shark Hunter » Logged

Life is Good!
Brewcrafter
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 224


« Reply #37 on: June 04, 2018, 10:08:18 PM »

This is a GREAT thread.  While for surf my current tool of choice is an "sorta" old Penn 5500SS mounted on a custom 7' rod (hey, at least it's a skirted spool!), stashed in the rafters is that 3 piece 13' fiberglass rod and Mitchell 488 that I grew up with that with a 4 oz. sand anchor has lobbed many a sand crab into a Sputnik orbit off Morro Bay...
But with all the great advice here, I would say if you are looking for "trouble free" go modern.  Especially since your supply lines in Alaska may be tenuous, and I am guessing with shipping a bit expensive as well.  My take - it is more important to be on the water with decent gear, than to be waiting to get on the water until you get awesome gear, and then missing fishing trips with the family!  And to Alan's point, no matter how cool and effective Old Gear is (and I am an Old Stuff kinda guy) spending a bunch a money to fix it or modern it up, and waiting/finding parts, can really keep you off the water.  In my case my Old Stuff is from 50 years of fishing and brings me memories and pleasure, and I enjoy bringing them back to life "almost" as much as using them. 
Logged
Alto Mare
Moderator
Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 12582


Southeastern Pennsylvania


« Reply #38 on: June 05, 2018, 02:11:02 AM »

This is a GREAT thread.  While for surf my current tool of choice is an "sorta" old Penn 5500SS mounted on a custom 7' rod (hey, at least it's a skirted spool!), stashed in the rafters is that 3 piece 13' fiberglass rod and Mitchell 488 that I grew up with that with a 4 oz. sand anchor has lobbed many a sand crab into a Sputnik orbit off Morro Bay...
But with all the great advice here, I would say if you are looking for "trouble free" go modern.  Especially since your supply lines in Alaska may be tenuous, and I am guessing with shipping a bit expensive as well.  My take - it is more important to be on the water with decent gear, than to be waiting to get on the water until you get awesome gear, and then missing fishing trips with the family!  And to Alan's point, no matter how cool and effective Old Gear is (and I am an Old Stuff kinda guy) spending a bunch a money to fix it or modern it up, and waiting/finding parts, can really keep you off the water.  In my case my Old Stuff is from 50 years of fishing and brings me memories and pleasure, and I enjoy bringing them back to life "almost" as much as using them. 
Well, I hear you, but there are some older reels out there that all they need is a good cleaning at least once a year and I mean taking it completely apart. Those will last for generations.
Be careful with the modern reels, those won't stay as smooth as they feel wnen you first use them for long, unless you've paid good money for it and I don't mean $100 or $200.
Even then, good luck finding replacement parts for those.

My brother vacations Santo Domingo for a month every year, his beautiful wife is from there.
He mentioned there isn't much there related to fishing gear, unless you go to the city.
He brought a couple new reels from here, but didn't last long. I told him to toss those and I would put a package together.
I asked  what size he was looking for and put together a package for him that included a Crak 200, a 700  green  and a Dam 550.
I've also included a couple of washers.
He should be ok for a while, but I have a feeling I might have to service them for him.

What I'm saying is there are other things to take in consideration, as location to be used, parts availability and so on.
A new reel will need replacemebnt parts much faster than an older dependable reel.

Just my opinion.


Sal
Logged

Forget about all the reasons why something may not work. You only need to find one good reason why it will.
Dominick
Administrator
Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7787


San Mateo, California


« Reply #39 on: June 05, 2018, 09:03:39 AM »

Opinion well taken.  Dominick
Logged

Leave the gun.  Take the cannolis.

 Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking beer.
Marcq
Sensei
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 956



« Reply #40 on: June 05, 2018, 07:16:47 PM »

I was a conventional guy since I was 10 until I bought my used Penn 710Z five years ago, took it apart and noticed how simple it was, requiring less maintenance , less prone to water intrusion  compared to conventional.
I was hooked AND!! I used to hate spinners

Still enjoy my Penn conventional but find myself cursing less with my spinners  Grin

Marc..
Logged
Reel Beaker
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 185


« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2018, 09:21:53 AM »


My $0.02


Luv the way you put across your 2 cents....
Logged
Reel Beaker
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 185


« Reply #42 on: June 14, 2018, 09:29:30 AM »

The Mitchell 300 (older models) are classic, great reels; can use them as ultralights in a pinch and they'll also handle heavier line for most freshwater fish.  You gotta keep in mind that they'll need to be maintained; if you can make the commitment to do that, they will last forever.  Only question mark would be saltwater use, but lots of folks use them for that, so again, maintenance to keep the salt off & you should be OK.  For $100, you can buy his-and-hers & still have $$ left.  If you're not of a mind to work with classic reels (slow retrieve, no R/L convertible retrieve, no skirted spools, etc.) then you will be better off with something new as suggested by some of the other posts.

Frank

Are mitchell reels any good? Never heard of the mitchell brand before. Are the newer models not that good? What is "no R/L convertible retrieve, no skirted spools". The cranking handle is stuck on one side only(right or left?) and the spool has no taper?
Logged
Reel Beaker
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 185


« Reply #43 on: June 14, 2018, 09:35:11 AM »

Alan Hawk gives the new Daiwa BG a great review. I need the biggest one for capacity and drag for Shark Fishing.
This reel is $100.
Both put out 30lbs of drag
I can Grab a Chair, a small cooler with a few beers, A small bag of tools (Gloves, Cutters, rigs) A rod spike and my Rod and make one trip to the Beach to be in the action, instead of four trips, Giant reels, Kayak, and lots of gear.
Never fished for sharks before.. but a $100 Daiwa BG can handle a shark? How large are the sharks you are fishing for? Would it be able to handle a 120+ pound stingray?

Whats a rod spike?
Logged
Shark Hunter
Moderator
Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 11189


The Rogue of the Seven Seas!


« Reply #44 on: June 14, 2018, 09:52:57 AM »

I haven't fished the BG yet, But I'm sure it can reel in a 6 foot Black Tip.
If you are going for big rays, I would step it up to reel with more drag, Like the Cabo 100 or 120 so you don't get spooled.
A rod spike is what you sit your rod into to keep the sand off of it and you don't have to hold it all the time.


* IMG_2908_zpsjoqtqxxe.jpg (186.29 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 67 times.)
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 09:55:35 AM by Shark Hunter » Logged

Life is Good!
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.24 seconds with 19 queries.