alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial The Proper Way to Net Fish From the Side of the Boat
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
October 14, 2019, 10:54:24 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The Proper Way to Net Fish From the Side of the Boat  (Read 866 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Dominick
Administrator
Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7664


San Mateo, California


« on: November 14, 2018, 06:02:46 PM »

   In looking at videos of netting fish (except for mates on commercial boats)  I noticed that the netter struggles with netting a fish.  I thought I would pass along some of what I learned and my experience with netting fish.  The first fish I attempted to net I just jabbed at the salmon from the back.  Wrong!  The fishís tail caught the rim of the net and it leaped using the rim as a springboard and broke the line.  I stood there red faced.  Luckily, I was fishing with a very good friend who told me that it was his fault as well as mine, because he should have explained what to do when the salmon comes to the boat. 

   He explained that the fisherman and the netter have to work as a team and never try to net the fish from the tail.  He further explained that the net should go under the fish and the fisherman then drops the head of the fish.  At the time the netter sees the fishís head drop the netter makes his scoop.  Now comes one of the important steps to help the netter keep his balance with a big salmon trying to flop his way out of the net.  The minute the rim of the net comes to the surface of the water point the handle of the net straight up.  What this does is it locks the net against the net rim and the fish cannot escape.  It also gives the netter more leverage to bring the fish on board (by now holding the rim instead of the handle) and not trying to hold a heavy fish at the end of a six foot pole.  The netter than should hold the captured fish against the side of the boat.  The fisherman then lets out some line and secures his rod in a rod holder.  When the netter sees that the fisherman is ready he should look around to make sure he has a clear space to swing the fish over the gunnels and on to the deck to start the stunning and unhooking process.  Done right this dance goes as smooth as a ballet.  Dominick
Logged

Leave the gun.  Take the cannolis.

 Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking beer.
Tiddlerbasher
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 2724



« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2018, 06:11:00 PM »

Keep on dancing Dom - you make it sound simple Grin Grin
Logged
JoseCuervo
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 126



« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2018, 10:01:30 PM »

The netter needs to always keep in mind that fish can only swim forward. The hoop of the net goes in the water in front of the fish just as it comes to the boat as the angler brings him in range of the net, hopefully as its head breaks the water (timing is everything, and it is teamwork for sure.. Smiley ). The fish might / will see the net and panick, but still can only swim forward and down into the net. Many deckhands also hold the bag of the net in one hand to keep it out of sight of the fish.  

I learned those tricks after losing a fish too. That was a nice write-up of a first hand experience, thanks for sharing.

Rob
« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 10:35:58 PM by JoseCuervo » Logged
Shark Hunter
Moderator
Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 11149


The Rogue of the Seven Seas!


« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2018, 11:24:58 PM »

I think there is a little luck involved too. Grin
Me and my uncles netted many a fish, but they still get away now and then from jumping out of the boat, or going right through a creel that wasn't latched at the bottom. Roll Eyes
Logged

Life is Good!
gstours
Firearms Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 2405



« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2018, 09:32:09 AM »

Dommie,  too many technical words, and rather lengthy instructions. Huh?  Could you just show me firsthand? Grin
Logged
foakes
Moderator
Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6045


Sierra National Forest


« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2018, 09:51:07 AM »

Yeah, I always hold the bottom of the net in my left hand and up ó so it doesnít spook the fish.

Good tips, Dominick!

Best,

Fred
Logged

Get a Good Night's Sleep -- Only (3) things happen after Midnight -- and none of them are good...


There are ten reasons to consider when choosing your next fishing reel.

The first is to pick a reel you like ó The other nine reasons donít matter.
Vintage Offshore Tackle
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 1630



« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2018, 10:09:29 AM »

A friend of mine has a boat that he keeps in Sitka year-round and he takes me salmon fishing every year and I have developed a netting technique that yields very consistent results.  We fish herring on downriggers with the traditional two-hook rig.  I try to wait until the fish is traveling from left to right, then I go deep with the net in front of the fish and lift the net quickly, leaving the fish teetering on the rim of the net with only the front half of the fish over the net, then I like to let the fish fall backwards off the rim of the net, catching the loose hook in the net as it falls, allowing the fish to rip free and fall back in the water.   I strongly recommend this technique, as I have found that it results in great savings in both fish processing costs and extra checked baggage fees.
Logged
foakes
Moderator
Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6045


Sierra National Forest


« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2018, 10:12:35 AM »

A friend of mine has a boat that he keeps in Sitka year-round and he takes me salmon fishing every year and I have developed a netting technique that yields very consistent results.  We fish herring on downriggers with the traditional two-hook rig.  I try to wait until the fish is traveling from left to right, then I go deep with the net in front of the fish and lift the net quickly, leaving the fish teetering on the rim of the net with only the front half of the fish over the net, then I like to let the fish fall backwards off the rim of the net, catching the loose hook in the net as it falls, allowing the fish to rip free and fall back in the water.   I strongly recommend this technique, as I have found that it results in great savings in both fish processing costs and extra checked baggage fees.

That is a great technique to use when netting a fish for a buddy that you have a bet going with, Randy!

Best,

Fred
Logged

Get a Good Night's Sleep -- Only (3) things happen after Midnight -- and none of them are good...


There are ten reasons to consider when choosing your next fishing reel.

The first is to pick a reel you like ó The other nine reasons donít matter.
Dominick
Administrator
Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7664


San Mateo, California


« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2018, 11:07:34 AM »

A friend of mine has a boat that he keeps in Sitka year-round and he takes me salmon fishing every year and I have developed a netting technique that yields very consistent results.  We fish herring on downriggers with the traditional two-hook rig.  I try to wait until the fish is traveling from left to right, then I go deep with the net in front of the fish and lift the net quickly, leaving the fish teetering on the rim of the net with only the front half of the fish over the net, then I like to let the fish fall backwards off the rim of the net, catching the loose hook in the net as it falls, allowing the fish to rip free and fall back in the water.   I strongly recommend this technique, as I have found that it results in great savings in both fish processing costs and extra checked baggage fees.

That is a great technique to use when netting a fish for a buddy that you have a bet going with, Randy!

Best,

Fred

 Grin Grin Grin Dominick
Logged

Leave the gun.  Take the cannolis.

 Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking beer.
gstours
Firearms Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 2405



« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2018, 07:15:58 PM »

Dommie was right in the teamwork idea.  If you have fished a little you already know not to net from the tail, nor top down.  Talking about when to scoop is the Rodmanís decision generally as he/she is steering and generally trying to make a decent presentation.   Many people get ancy and make unnecessary mistakes.   Hey 👋 Iíve lost some trying to net hot fish, and had some get free after a less than perfect chance too.   Hindsight is the best teacher.  Butt the netter is generally unappreciated till you lose a good one.   
  Then thereís snagging the salmon flasher as the fish canít get in and itís hanging on the outside,   Or once I got a planer stuck in the netting on a short false scoop and a couple of shakes the big king was free. Angry
 
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.228 seconds with 17 queries.