alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial 8 ft vs 9 ft rods for yellowtail
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October 22, 2019, 12:34:02 AM *
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Author Topic: 8 ft vs 9 ft rods for yellowtail  (Read 338 times)
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jlezama
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« on: August 30, 2019, 11:16:33 AM »

Hi All
I have a question I have an ft rod and in the beginning I thought I could use it as my rod for throwing irons 30-60 FAST action (mostly for yellowtail fishing) but from what I have seen most people use the 9 footers for throwing iron. So the question is, should I get a 9 footer? I assume the reason for having it is for casting distance (better arc while casting)? are there any other advantages? I paired the rod with an ocea jigger 4000. and a last question, What would be the fishing applications if I keep the 8 footer?
Thanks
Juan
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MarkT
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« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2019, 11:20:15 AM »

I use both 8 and 9'ers for throwing surface iron.  You can get more distance with the 9'er.  I took the 8'er to Cedros Island last year since it's easier to deal with on the plane and got 3 YT throwing Tady 45's.  I'm taking the 9'er this year.
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SoCalAngler
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« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2019, 12:11:16 PM »

I use eight footers for the surface iron. Find it easier with home and boat storage and transportation that dealing with an 8 footer is easier than dealing with a 9 footer
« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 12:12:16 PM by SoCalAngler » Logged
Ron Jones
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« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2019, 01:34:10 PM »

I have concluded that, convenience of travel aside, it depends on the boat. I will always prefer a longer rod, but if I am on a boat that has me high up off the water (the bow of a long range boat, for example,) the 9 ft rod keeps the jig in the water just a bit longer, and lets you keep the line closer to parallel to the water for better jig performance. On a smaller vessel, not that big of deal. The only downside to a long rod is when you get into a prolonged, hot bite and your arms start giving out. Easier to lift an 8ft rod every time.
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Ronald Jones
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Fishy247
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« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2019, 03:41:45 PM »

As far as I'm concerned, the only advantage of a 9'er is more casting distance. I'll choose a 9'er pretty much every time though...even if it means getting the crap kicked out of me on a big fish! Probably has to do with coming up in SoCal.
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SoCalAngler
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« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2019, 08:14:38 PM »

Valid points made and I like the insight of others. If I was you I would start with a 8' rod in the 30-40 lb test range. Locally I fish a rods for 25-30 lb range, live bait fishing is not out of the question with a rods like these. But, a 9' rod will most likely be a surface iron rod only and in the 40-50 lb test range will most likely be used on trips longer than 4-5 days in IMO.

I have only been fishing So Cal waters since 1976 and I know others have a lot more experience than me. I would just say start lighter in lb test if looking to go under 5 day trips in length out of So Cal.

I fully get 9 footers and the advantage in length of a cast. But, what are we talking about 10-25 yards more per cast? Sure it could be a bit more, but if the fish are not biting the things cast by a 8' rod do you think they will jump onto a jig cast say 15 yards longer?

Look at what works for you. If buying a 9 footer look at how you will transport the rod, where most boats store 9' rods and how that works for you.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 09:31:12 AM by SoCalAngler » Logged
jlezama
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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2019, 09:20:07 PM »

Thanks guys! Lots of wisdom here!
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Swami805
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« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2019, 05:53:34 AM »

I'd go with the 9' for throwing iron. I use all 10' to get the extra distance. Extra distance has your jig in the water longer which ups your chances of getting bit. Also helpful when you see a few birds dipping on a feeding yellow to get a jig to it. Yeah you get beat up a little more but you need to get bit 1st.
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Fishy247
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« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2019, 10:48:44 AM »

Quote
Yeah you get beat up a little more but you need to get bit 1st.

All too true! Lol...I'll fish bait on a 9' rod, but I'm kinda crazy like that. Hahaha. Most of my 9'ers shut off closer to the butt though. Sometimes it makes a difference, sometimes I just like to show off...
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Cor
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« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2019, 10:58:54 AM »

Everything that has been said above I would agree with.

We fish visually, so we spot the shoal and take the boat as close as we can get without spooking the fish.    Often the fish are boat shy and you can’t get much closer then say 70 meters, so if you are unable to cast that far you can’t get the first cast over the fish.
For that reason we fish anything from 9' 6” to 10' 6” even 11 ft occasionally.

The downside of a long rod in our application is:-
•   It is difficult to get the fish close to the boat to stick a gaff in to it or lifting it by the leader, yourself without lifting the rod tip too high and risking a breakage.      
 Probably not an issue on a large boat.
•   Same applies if you wish to lift the fish in to the boat with the rod, you need to lift the rod  too high.
•   A long stiff rod becomes a back breaker if you are catching strong fish.    A parabolic medium action is advised if you want to use a long stick.
•   It can get in the way, and be unwieldy,  if you are fishing amongst a number of people.

I normally take two Yellowtail rods, a 10 ft 35 lb that can cast about 80 mt and a strong 8 ft 50 lb that casts 60 mt.  The latter I only bring in to action when the fish are plentiful and around the boat, or dogs or sharks are after the fish, and I wish to get them onboard as fast as possible.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 09:32:36 PM by Cor » Logged

Cornelis
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« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2019, 03:13:13 PM »

Trying to cast an OJ4000 is probably a fairly large part of your problem.

OJ's are built for vertical jigging, narrow spool so they self-manage line lay, not for casting distance. That big tall spool has loads of inertia, and the faster decrease in effective spool diameter as line leaves the reel is also fighting you.
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Cor
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« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2019, 11:04:13 PM »

Everything that has been said above I would agree with.

We fish visually, so we spot the shoal and take the boat as close as we can get without spooking the fish.    Often the fish are boat shy and you can’t get much closer then say 70 meters, so if you are unable to cast that far you can’t get the first cast over the fish.
For that reason we fish anything from 9' 6” to 10' 6” even 11 ft occasionally.

The downside of a long rod in our application is:-
•   It is difficult to get the fish close to the boat to stick a gaff in to it or lifting it by the leader, yourself without lifting the rod tip too high and risking a breakage.    Probably not an issue on a large boat.
•   Same applies if you wish to lift the fish in to the boat with the rod, you need to lift the rod  too high.
•   A long stiff rod becomes a back breaker if you are catching strong fish.    A parabolic medium action is advised if you want to use a long stick.
•   It can get in the way, and be unwieldy,  if you are fishing amongst a number of people.

I normally take two Yellowtail rods, a 10 ft 35 lb that can cast about 80 mt and a strong 8 ft 50 lb that casts 60 mt.  The latter I only bring in to action when the fish are plentiful and around the boat, or dogs or sharks are after the fish, and I wish to get them onboard as fast as possible.

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Cornelis
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