alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Orvis 100
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
October 28, 2020, 11:58:34 AM *
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Author Topic: Orvis 100  (Read 3980 times)
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Midway Tommy
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« on: April 02, 2020, 08:15:03 PM »

A few weeks or so ago I decided to open up this old Orvis 100 and do a tutorial on it. These Italian made reels really don't get enough respect. They are quite collectible but their quality is right up there with most of the quality open face spinning reels from that era. This specific model, with the knurled plastic handle knob and offered in 1954, was the second version sold by Orvis. Orvis' first model was called the Pelican 100. The only difference between the two reels is that the Pelican 100 has a raised Pelican on the side instead of the jumping Trout. The next version, 1962, has a flat paddle style knob. I purchased this reel a few years ago as a parts reel. It was stiff, the rotor would stop part way around, the bail spring was weak & wouldn't close without help and the anti-reverse wouldn't release. Once I opened it up I could see there was no reason not to make it totally functional once again. It really didn't have a lot of bulky grease, just old stuff that was stiff.

After disassembly I did my usual process of soaking all the unpainted metal parts in my lacquer thinner jar. I did my normal Original White Goop & warm water Dawn wash on all the painted and plastic parts. After a couple of days soaking, good cleaning and buffing here are all the parts ready to reassemble.



I started with the spool. The drag stack consists of one thin flat washer, two spring washers, the top keyed washer and a retaining sleeve. The holes in the top washer are to keep the drag knob from turning when the detent balls are in the holes. I made, and added, a mylar washer at the bottom of the stack.



The click spring was broken so I made a new one out of some sheet brass I keep on hand for just these type of issues. You never know when you might have to fabricate an obsolete part.



As usual, before my hands get all greasy I install the bail trip, bail spring and bail arm. Most Zangi made reels only use one bail spring. I use ArmorAll as a lubricant in these locations because it stays slick and doesn't collect dirt & grime. Zangi often used a plunger type rod as a bail trip. The rod slides inside a spring in a tube in the rotor and is retained in the tube by the bail arm. After the bail trip & bail arm are installed I'll check the bail for perfect alignment and bend, or adjust it, where necessary, and then install it.



Here you can see the bail trip plunger. At this point I set the rotor aside to install later.



I start the body assembly with the anti-reverse pivot & knob. This reel has kind of a unique spring design. It is a flat springy metal strip that sits in a slot and is kept in place by a screw. There is a ratchet gear on the back side of the main gear and the flat strip spring wedges against a ratchet gear tooth. The knob is retained on the pivot by a pin. All the internal parts get lubed with Super Lube grease and synthetic oil. I grease every screw hole for easier removal down the road.



It's time to install the pinion worm gear. The pinion worm gear rides full length in a removable oilite bushing/sleeve. The bushing is retained in place with a slot and by a screw. There is a hole in the body and oilite bushing so the worm gear and ball bearing can easily be lubricated when the side plate is removed.



Next step is to install the bearing between the body and rotor. This model has a plastic retaining washer with five holes and balls sandwiched between two metal washers. It also has a felt washer that goes against the body and is probably meant to reduce noise. I  prefer slower greased lubricated ball bearings so I lubricate them with Super Lube grease and then add a little oil to thin the grease. There are two threaded bail trip studs. The bail will trip in two locations, top and bottom.




Itís now time to slip in the main gear, snug up the locking nuts and install the rotor. The main gear and worm gear need to be meshed correctly before tightening the rotor nut. The rotor nut, like most Zangi made reels, is reverse thread, i.e. lefty tighten. Many an unknowing owner has cracked one of those brass reverse thread nuts and they're near impossible to find. It doesn't take much wrong way torque to break them.



Now the main shaft and oscillation gear get installed. Like I said earlier, all the internal parts get greased with Super Lube & synthetic oil. The oscillation arm attaches to the main shaft with a threaded pin. The oscillation arm attaches to the main gear with a reverse thread screw. There is a thin spacing washer between arm and gear.




It's time to adjust the main gear and tighten the lock nuts. I use two small spanner wrenches to tighten the notched nuts against each other. Internals are all done so now it's time to install the handle knob (I use ArmorAll here, too), handle, side plate, under spool felt washer, spool and drag knob. I completely unscrewed the handle mechanism to remove it. That should not be done. The flat threaded part should remain in the main gear and the handle retaining pin, only, should be removed. The threads inside the main gear have been crimped to keep the handle from easily being removed or unthreading. I forgot about that function and took it out anyway. It ended up not being a big deal but it took me a long time to get it out and I had to figure out a way to recrimp it when I put it back together.   



It's all back together, cleaned up nicely and works like new!




It feels good to take a morgue bound reel and put it back into fish catching condition. These little Orvis reels don't get the respect they deserve. They're old time quality and engineering that will compete with just about any from that time period.
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

Tommy D (ORCA), NE



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« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2020, 09:37:08 PM »

Very interesting reel Tommy. Thanks for your efforts presenting it to us.
Greg
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« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2020, 02:06:48 AM »

Thank you Tommy I never even new they existed.
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« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2020, 02:15:04 AM »

   Great tutorial Tom. I've been lurking for an Orvis 50 for ages...they just don't pop up for peanuts...a very collectible reel. Thanks for the tour of the inner works! Cool
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« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2020, 03:53:41 AM »

Very interesting Tommy, nice job, & good pics, thank, cheers Don.
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« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2020, 06:25:44 AM »

Nice breakdown, Tom --

I have only worked on 3 or 4 of the 100 and a couple more of the next size up in these Orvis spinners.

Needed to make click springs on (2) of them, similar to your technique.

Decent quality -- and these smaller ones are pretty valuable.

Best,

Fred
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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2020, 07:32:58 AM »

 Great job, Tommy!  Those old loose ball bearing reels aren't too bad to service if the reel technician is expecting them.
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« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2020, 08:33:19 AM »

Really appreciate these tutorials.Tommy,is this the same company that made the Ted Williams spinners for Sears,I have some of the skirted spool models that Daiwa made but didn't know if their Italian built models would have the worm drive like these.
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Midway Tommy
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« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2020, 11:18:10 AM »

Really appreciate these tutorials.Tommy,is this the same company that made the Ted Williams spinners for Sears,I have some of the skirted spool models that Daiwa made but didn't know if their Italian built models would have the worm drive like these.

Yes. Early Ted Williams models (1954-mid '70s) were made in Italy by Zangi. While there are some minor differences, like standard bearings, etc., their design and servicing take down would be similar. Shakespeare also made five models, III, IV, VI, 470 & 930 (2052, 2062, 2081, 2062 & 2091-A), in the late '60's into the early '70s. By the mid '70s pretty much all Ted Williams reels were made in Japan.

Also, Zangi made reels for Sears. Those reels have a sticker decal. They were phased out when Williams became an adviser in 1962, and subsequent reels came under the Ted Williams moniker. Some of them say Sears & have stickers, some have numbers & some have both.   
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

Tommy D (ORCA), NE



Favorite Activity? ............... In our boat fishing
RELAXING w/ MY BEST FRIEND (My wife Bonnie)
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« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2020, 11:48:20 AM »

Midway!!!!

How about these reels???

The Pelican 100 you mentioned above, but the Bermuda 100 reels - same story as the Orvis 100 Manufacturer???  



Viewed a Bermuda 100 reel on eBay while vacating in Bermuda, but for the last bid of $200 I left THAT REEL alone!!!!   Kept my $$$.

Wayne
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Midway Tommy
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« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2020, 02:54:41 PM »

Midway!!!!

How about these reels???

The Pelican 100 you mentioned above, but the Bermuda 100 reels - same story as the Orvis 100 Manufacturer???  

Viewed a Bermuda 100 reel on eBay while vacating in Bermuda, but for the last bid of $200 I left THAT REEL alone!!!!   Kept my $$$.

Wayne

Wayne,

Those are later versions with the paddle style knob. They're similar to 100A just a different color. Not much is known about the Bermuda 100. It's thought it was made for a specific US market. It would be cool to own either of those. It is interesting to note that that color combo was also used on Zangi made True Temper spinners.

The first Orvis Pelican 100s were painted silverish or goldish tan colors. Those paints chipped & peeled a lot. Next came the anodized Pelican 100s, then the Orvis 100.   
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

Tommy D (ORCA), NE



Favorite Activity? ............... In our boat fishing
RELAXING w/ MY BEST FRIEND (My wife Bonnie)
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« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2020, 05:36:00 PM »

Way to go, Tommy; often hear about these reels but seldom see the details about them.

Wayne's reels caught my eye too.

Frank
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« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2020, 06:19:39 AM »

         Great info on the Ted Williams and Sears spinners,didn't know about the Shakespeare connection.Thanks.
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« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2020, 09:46:32 AM »

Great pictures and tutorial.... Tommy thanks for sharing. I ended up making a new bail trip plunger and my Orvis is in action again!  Smiley Smiley
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Midway Tommy
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« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2020, 10:25:42 AM »

Great pictures and tutorial.... Tommy thanks for sharing. I ended up making a new bail trip plunger and my Orvis is in action again!  Smiley Smiley

Good for you, Mark!
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Love those open face spinning reels! (Especially ABU & ABU/Zebco Cardinals)

Tommy D (ORCA), NE



Favorite Activity? ............... In our boat fishing
RELAXING w/ MY BEST FRIEND (My wife Bonnie)
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