alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Senator 110 (1/0)
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Author Topic: Senator 110 (1/0)  (Read 11993 times)
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sdlehr
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« on: April 06, 2016, 06:39:57 PM »

Post questions about this reel in this thread
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Sid Lehr
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nelz
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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2018, 12:53:43 PM »

I've noticed some of the 110's have a yellow knob. Are these more collectible than the white knob versions? Are they older/newer?


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broadway
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2018, 01:00:39 PM »

Knob color is no way to tell a reel's date.  Go for reels with non numbered parts for collectibility or New Old Stock reels as they go up in value as well.
I started to with 60's, 70's, and 80's reels then figured it out... just trying to save you some time and dough,
Dom
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nelz
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2018, 09:59:04 PM »

I've been wanting to acquire that tiniest Senator of them all for some time now, I finally picked one up. Just a few scratches on the outside, but the inside looks so clean, almost unused. Still has the original leather drag in great shape, and all steel gears. But, I was surprised that it does not have ball bearings like its big brothers.

I'm keeping it all stock unless I can find a bargain on a lighter spool one of these days. I bought this for inshore bottom fishing so the stock leather drag is fine. All in all, it's a sweeet little reel as is, a keeper for sure. Looks like I'm regressing in my choice of gear lately, going "old school".  Grin Roll Eyes


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« Last Edit: March 10, 2018, 10:05:18 PM by nelz » Logged
Ron Jones
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« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2018, 04:21:21 AM »

Really nice. My grandfather taught us to condition the leather drags with mink oil to preserve them. I've never tested the drag #s with oil.
Ron
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Ronald Jones
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mo65
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« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2018, 05:25:13 AM »

My grandfather taught us to condition the leather drags with mink oil to preserve them.

   I've heard several folks here who I trust say oiling the leather drags helps them. This is in contrast to what reel manufacturers say, but they also say to run carbontex dry, and we all know greasing them works best. I have noticed in my experiments that leather drags are smooth up to higher settings, they only become unstable when maxed. At midrange they perform pretty good.

I'm keeping it all stock unless I can find a bargain on a lighter spool one of these days.

   You might want to check Pro Challenger's website. Alan has some sweet 501 spools to fit your 1/0. His price is comparable to used spools on eBay, but his are new, and come in great colors. Great lookin' 1/0 you have there. Cool

                https://squareup.com/market/pro-challenger-llc/item/jigmaster-aluminum-spool
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Swami805
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« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2018, 06:05:07 AM »

That's a beauty, Keep meaning to trick one out for fishing.
I have 501 aluminum spools from penn, newell, tiburon and pro challenger. The PC ones are a very nice product, my 1st choice out of the 4, great color selection too. Nothing wrong with the others though.
Might want to consider upgrading the drags. Section 58301 of Murphy's law clearly states that big fish of the day will hit the reel needing a drag upgrade, A couple of sawbucks is a pretty good investment for a set of HT100's.
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nelz
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« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2018, 06:23:52 AM »

I lightly greased the leather with Cal's and it seems to have worked well, at least in my living room for now, we'll see. I'll have CF disks on hand for the next time I crack her open, but that dog/spring was such a pain to put back that I'll just stick to the leather until it goes.

Btw, I just looked at schematics for the 4/0 and I don't see any ball bearings there either. Never worked on Senators before, but I always thought they had BB's?

These mini-Senators are really cool looking!
« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 06:33:52 AM by nelz » Logged
Donnyboat
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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2018, 10:06:56 AM »

Hi Nelz, nice reel alright, in the shearing gear, they used to have, leather cones, running against steel drive wheels, the best way to get the leather, to grip to the metal, was to dress it with Neets foot oil, the leather really sokes it in, you would think it wood slip more, but it actually grips real good, and preserves the leather, stops it from cracking, the grease maybe working for now, but long turm, the grease may damage it, cheers Don.
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Don, or donnyboat
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« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2018, 01:09:49 PM »

Hi Don
Well it`s great to hear neetsfoot oil is good for something. We old sign writers use grease to keep the sable/ox  hairs on our small brushes that we use for enamel, in good condition.
I was given some bad advice once to put neetsfoot oil on the brushes instead. Well, it might have been good for the hairs, but it ate the chrome off the ferrules down to the brass in very short time.

By the way, what is a neet?

cheers
Greg
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Donnyboat
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« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2018, 06:11:08 PM »

Hi Greg, thanks for that info, I did not know it attacked chrome, pay to keep it away from chrome rings then, but if will soke into the leather, there would not be any run off, that is neet, thanks again cheers Don.
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Don, or donnyboat
sdlehr
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« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2018, 06:32:27 AM »

Summary of pertinent information from Wikipedia article here

Neatsfoot oil is a yellow oil rendered and purified from the shin bones and feet (but not the hooves) of cattle. "Neat" in the oil's name comes from an old English word for cattle.[1] Neatsfoot oil is used as a conditioning, softening and preservative agent for leather.

Modern neatsfoot oil is still made from cattle-based products, and is sometimes criticized for a tendency to speed oxidation of leather.[2] This formulation does darken leather, which means that use on light-colored leather is likely to change its color. If mineral oil or other petroleum-based material is added, the product may be called "neatsfoot oil compound".[3] Some brands have also been shown to be adulterated with rapeseed oil, soya oil, and other oils.[4] The addition of mineral oils may lead to more rapid decay of non-synthetic stitching or speed breakdown of the leather itself.[3][5][6]

Neatsfoot oil is used on a number of leather products, although it has been replaced by synthetic products for certain applications. Items such as baseball gloves, saddles, horse harnesses and other horse tack can be softened and conditioned with neatsfoot oil.

If used on important historical objects, neatsfoot oil (like other leather dressings) can oxidize with time and contribute to embrittling.[7] It also may leave an oily residue that can attract dust. On newer leather, it may cause darkening (even after a single application), thus may not be a desirable product to use when the maintenance of a lighter shade is desired. Neatsfoot oil is more useful for routine use on working equipment.

Neatsfoot oil is often used to oil sign-writers' brushes that have been used in oil-based paint, as this oil is non drying and can be easily washed out with solvent at any time. Oiling the brushes reduces the buildup of pigment in the ferrule, the metal part that many brushes have to hold the hairs in place.
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Sid Lehr
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« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2018, 01:37:52 PM »

Very interesting Sid. Thank you for this.
Greg
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« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2018, 02:39:06 PM »

that's what we used to break in baseball glove. then we rubber banded a ball in the pocket where we wanted the cup to be
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sdlehr
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« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2018, 07:29:31 PM »

Knob color is no way to tell a reel's date. 
Dom is right. I've not seen a handle knob make much of a difference in a reel's value with very few exceptions. Knob colors mean nothing. Knob styles can make a difference, as can counterbalance styles.
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Sid Lehr
Veterinarian, fishing enthusiast, custom rod builder, reel collector
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