alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial need help to fix a broken running guide on a trevala rod
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
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Author Topic: need help to fix a broken running guide on a trevala rod  (Read 3412 times)
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steelfish
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« on: May 03, 2016, 05:50:28 PM »

so, guys, I dont know if rod building is full of secrets and special recepies so excuse me if Im asking for something that is not permited on the rod building world.


I have a trevala rod with a broken guide, the last running guide and the tip top are done.

tip tops are easy to repair, I have repair a lot of tiptops for my rods and my friend rods but never a running guide.
and I would like to know how difficult and how much I would spend on materials to install just one guide.

first let me tell you that locally there is no fishing store or fishing shop that offer repair/building rods, the closest fishing shop with that service is 4 hrs from me, I have only needed that service two times inmany years and always waited until a friend goes to that place to send my rods with him but I have to wait 6-8 weeks to have it back.

this time is only one guide what is broken as I previously said, I really dont want to buy a power wrapper or any expensive tool, if you think it can be done as an amateur job with decent skills and home tools I will try it, but I will need a lot of assistance I dont know if someone can guide me step by step how to remove a broken guide, how to wrap the thread, epoxic, in short all steps to make it look as factory made as possible.


I alredy have:
the new guide
flexcoat 5 minute
nylon wrap thread (for rod building)
jig bobbin (if needed)


if you need a pic of the rod to give a better assistance I will upload it later when I get home, maybe if I found comfortable with this small job, I might end up building a rod from the scratch.

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Marcq
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« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2016, 05:57:09 PM »

Not that hard, you will find tons of video on youtube. You could do an easy job with five minute epoxy, do you have the color tread needed? Or you don't mind what it will end up looking like

Marc..
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cbar45
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« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2016, 07:53:53 PM »

Hi Alex,

What you propose can certainly be done without a power-wrapper or expensive tools:

1. A simple cardboard box with V-cutouts at the top of each end will work to support the rod.

2. Thread tension can be accomplished by placing the loose spool in a jar and running the thread between the pages of a heavy book.
    (Or you can use the bobbin you already have)--you want the tension to be just tight enough that it takes a little effort to pull out some
     thread, pinching it with just your thumb and index finger.

3. Old braided line of about 20 lb. test makes great pull-through loops for completing your guide wrap.

4. Any clean cylindrical object--like a metal pen barrel--will work to "burnish" your wraps; that is the closing up of any gaps and minor    
    inconsistencies by lightly rolling the tool over the thread--in a direction parallel to the rod blank.

5. Masking tape, isopropyl alcohol, scissors/razor, small brush, and paper towels are items you probably already have.

6. The rod must be turned for approx. 3 hours after finish is applied. This is probably one of the more tedious tasks--especially if you don't
    have a motor to do the job--but still can be done by hand. A comfortable chair and something to snack on helps pass the time. The rod
    must be turned continuously for the first hour or so, then intermittently in 90-degree arcs after that.

The broken guide can be removed by gently heating the wraps with a blow-dryer, then slicing the thread and softened epoxy with a razor held almost flat and directly above the guide foot. Doing so protects the blade from nicking the blank as you cut. You'll find that the wrap can literally be peeled off once a section of thread starts to uncoil. Any residual epoxy is removed by scraping with something like a plastic picnic knife or angular piece of bamboo. A little riskier--but faster--method is to scrape using the blade of your razor held at a 90-degree angle in relation to the blank.

Don't worry about the remaining ridges of epoxy at each end of where the guide was; you will start your new wrap just inboard of these ridges, and once finish is put on they will blend in as to be unnoticeable. The ridges also serve as a guide to help you locate where to start the new wrap, such that its completed length will match all the other guides on the rod.

The actual wrapping of the new guide is pretty straightforward if you've watched a tutorial or two--5-6 locking turns to start, up and over the foot, then the pull-through loop inserted 5-6 turns before you reach the end. Many first-timers find it somewhat challenging to transition the thread from the blank onto the guide foot, especially if the foot's taper isn't all that shallow. One way around this is to prep the top of the foot by grinding it down a little to ease the thread's transition--but then you need to touch-up the areas of bare metal with suitable paint--otherwise it will show through your wraps if no color preserver is used. Another method is to wrap a few turns straight onto the foot a little higher than normal, then gently push that band of thread down and into place over the tip of the foot. Luckily most guides today come pre-ground making for an easier time of just wrapping straight up and onto the guide.

Likewise, achieving a crisp, straight, finish edge is something that takes a little doing for a first-timer. If you have some broken blanks or pool cues it might be a good idea to mix up a practice batch of finish and get to know its traits. You only have about a 30-minute working time window, but for one guide that is more than enough. Pay attention to what happens if finish is applied too thick, too thin, etc. Generally an initial flood coat evenly wetting out the thread is all you need, then an additional coat over that. For a straight edge, load the brush, place it on the wrap, then spin the blank with your other hand a half rotation or so. Lift the brush and repeat the process accordingly.

P.S.
I noticed you listed Flexcoat 5-Min in your materials list, sounds like that is their epoxy adhesive used for gluing reel seats and such. For guide wraps you need to use what is called an epoxy finish--it will say either "high build" or "light" on the bottles and has a longer working time. Hope this helps.

Chad
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steelfish
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« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2016, 08:49:09 AM »

Hi Alex,

6. The rod must be turned for approx. 3 hours after finish is applied. This is probably one of the more tedious tasks--especially if you don't
    have a motor to do the job--but still can be done by hand. A comfortable chair and something to snack on helps pass the time. The rod
    must be turned continuously for the first hour or so, then intermittently in 90-degree arcs after that.


P.S.
I noticed you listed Flexcoat 5-Min in your materials list, sounds like that is their epoxy adhesive used for gluing reel seats and such. For guide wraps you need to use what is called an epoxy finish--it will say either "high build" or "light" on the bottles and has a longer working time. Hope this helps.

Chad

thanks Chad, that was pretty informative, can I ask why the rod must be turned by 3 hrs after the finish is applied? (by finish do you mean the epoxy on the guide wraps, right?)
actually, I need to check the materials I bought few months ago, I think its not the 5-min epoxic but something about light epoxic, Im pretty sure its not simple glue epoxic but the one for the guides, I bought a kit on mudhole late fall it was gonna be a winter project to change all the guides on my muskie rod for better ones and make it acid-wrapped but it never happened  Embarrassed, I just bought the epoxic, thread and guides, but the guides ended up being too small, I ordered the wrong size by mistake and never took the project again  Undecided

building my own rod is something that attracts me since some time ago, but havent had the time and space needed to get into

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Keta
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« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2016, 09:08:19 AM »

thanks Chad, that was pretty informative, can I ask why the rod must be turned by 3 hrs after the finish is applied? (by finish do you mean the epoxy on the guide wraps, right?)

Turn for 3 hours not after 3 hours so the epoxy does not sag.
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Hi, my name is Lee and I have a fishing gear problem.
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« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2016, 05:46:55 AM »

A cheap drying motor set up is well worth the money. Constantly turning by hand for a long time gets kind of painfully boring and still may not come out smooth. It will no doubt be strong and effective doing it by hand but nicer with a drying motor.
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Keta
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« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2016, 06:20:52 AM »

I have an extra dryer setup. If you want it N/C. PM me.

Joe

Jump on this Alex, it will make the job much easier.
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Hi, my name is Lee and I have a fishing gear problem.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
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steelfish
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« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2016, 08:36:34 AM »

can I ask why the rod must be turned by 3 hrs after the finish is applied? (by finish do you mean the epoxy on the guide wraps, right?)

sorry, Lee your right, I was lost in traslation, I was meaning, it have to be turned by 3hrs just after the epoxic have been applied



I have an extra dryer setup. If you want it N/C. PM me.

Joe

PM Joe

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steelfish
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« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2016, 04:46:36 PM »

ok, just to continue with the end of this thread


I got the Dryer from Joe (thanks a lot buddy) and after training with some cheap rods I finally decided to fix the trevala rod.
it was a lot easier that I though it would be.
this is the dryier Joe sent me, I installed also the last running guide on a Terez rod from a friend of mine in this pic





not a professional job with is really a lot better than all the local guys that made urgent repairs with 5-min epoxic and fishing braid line as winding thread, anyway, this is the ending job.



tip top out as well as the last running guide



this is the result










please dont mind the football style epoxic finish, I kind of like it LOL, hopefully on my next repairs I will get better finish job


thanks guys for your tips and help.
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