alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Tackle box plans
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juicebruiser
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« on: December 27, 2018, 05:42:31 PM »

Not reel related but thought someone could direct me to a site with plans for a wooden tackle box.
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alantani
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« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2018, 07:14:11 PM »

mark mayo might be able to help.  http://alantani.com/index.php?board=75.0
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foakes
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2018, 01:55:48 PM »

There are as many types of possible tackle boxes as there are fishermen.

If I was building a tackle box — first thing would be to determine exactly what I wanted to keep inside — with just a little room for expansion.  Fresh, salt, boat, shore, ice, etc..

Plus flexibility would also be good to be able to store hooks, swivels, lead, etc. — in small plastic covered containers such as film or prescription containers and lids.  Also, the ability to keep lures with hooks separated but easy to use.

Lots of information and possibilities on the internet, YouTube, etc..

Here is a clever little box that is just a basic design — however, it shows some common sense techniques that incorporate a few basic power tools, some hand tools, simplicity, and durability.

The ideas can be modified — but I just thought the techniques and presentation were excellent.



Mark Mayo, on our site — is a Master Woodworker that creates designs and boxes that will outlast the purchaser.

Best,

Fred
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Your good, worthwhile  plan will always keep changing...However, a good vision will always remain constant and unchanging...
Ron Jones
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2018, 02:22:12 PM »

Anything that John Heinz does is cool! Excet his C clamps, Mattias Wandel's are better (I spend a little time on YouTube.)
The Man
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Ronald Jones
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Alto Mare
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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2018, 03:15:24 PM »

Nice design, but very light duty.
I'm wondering how he was able to nail the 1/4" panel from the side, I would have a hard time, but I only been doing this for 44 years Undecided.

Still, a very nice simple and functional design.

Sal
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foakes
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« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2018, 04:04:46 PM »

Nice design, but very light duty.
I'm wondering how he was able to nail the 1/4" panel from the side, I would have a hard time, but I only been doing this for 44 years Undecided.

Still, a very nice simple and functional design.

Sal

Right Sal, it is light duty, and not good for a tackle box, IMO.

I would have figured out first if this was a fresh, salt, boat box, surf box — then design accordingly using hardwood — or at least Marine Ply with no voids and a smooth surface — and although box or finger joints are very good, if using hardwood, I would use a blind dovetail.  If high quality plywood — it would need to be at least 1/2” — and the finger joints would be at 1/2” intervals.

As to the top and bottom panels — I believe he is probably using a 23 gauge pin nailer that is shooting 1” SS pins slightly below the surface.  These are a great invention for trim, and other jobs.  I have a Hitachi 23 gauge pin nailer that shoots up to 1” SS pins.  What a great tool!  I do not think they were around 44 years ago.   Wink Wink Wink

I would also install eight SS corners along with SS hardware.

This is just a simple example of a simple process to build any type of box — not necessarily a tackle specific box.

It shows that it doesn’t need to be complicated — if design follows function and thought.

Best,

Fred

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Patience...and the rewards that come with it -- need to be experienced...otherwise, it isn't patience!


What's the difference between a worthwhile plan and a vision?

Your good, worthwhile  plan will always keep changing...However, a good vision will always remain constant and unchanging...
Benni3
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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2018, 05:14:50 PM »

Nice design, but very light duty.
I'm wondering how he was able to nail the 1/4" panel from the side, I would have a hard time, but I only been doing this for 44 years Undecided.

Still, a very nice simple and functional design.

Sal
44yrs,,,,, Wink you got 56yrs more to go,,,, Grin
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« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2018, 05:36:34 PM »

The answer is. Mark Mayo! Wink Cheesy

Joe
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« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2018, 05:58:40 PM »

That box was used for camera equipment, that he uses in his shop. Definitely not strong enough for tackle.

I'm designing what I call a "Panga Box" for Cedros. It will hold 2 3600 boxes and a little terminal tackle. Overall size will be way less than 2 3700 boxes. To get around the weight/ durability problem I will use hardwood framed panels of 1/4" marine ply. The frames will be enough for joinery and the panel will save considerable weight. I will use through dovetails as they are stronger than blinds and the lid will use hidden marine hinges. Silicone bronze if I can find the size I want. I will use as little metal as possible because it always turns into an issue regardless of the alloy. The best thing to do with wood and water is an oil finish that you keep up with, unless it will sit in water for extended periods of time. I probably won't keep up with an oil finish and so I will paint it with marine epoxy paint (it is very nice living next to Port Townsend.)

These are just my ideas on how a box should be built, there are a bazillion ways to skin this cat and they all have strengths and weaknesses.

Ron
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Ronald Jones
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Alto Mare
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« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2018, 06:49:55 PM »

Nice design, but very light duty.
I'm wondering how he was able to nail the 1/4" panel from the side, I would have a hard time, but I only been doing this for 44 years Undecided.

Still, a very nice simple and functional design.

Sal

Right Sal, it is light duty, and not good for a tackle box, IMO.

I would have figured out first if this was a fresh, salt, boat box, surf box — then design accordingly using hardwood — or at least Marine Ply with no voids and a smooth surface — and although box or finger joints are very good, if using hardwood, I would use a blind dovetail.  If high quality plywood — it would need to be at least 1/2” — and the finger joints would be at 1/2” intervals.

As to the top and bottom panels — I believe he is probably using a 23 gauge pin nailer that is shooting 1” SS pins slightly below the surface.  These are a great invention for trim, and other jobs.  I have a Hitachi 23 gauge pin nailer that shoots up to 1” SS pins.  What a great tool!  I do not think they were around 44 years ago.   Wink Wink Wink

I would also install eight SS corners along with SS hardware.

This is just a simple example of a simple process to build any type of box — not necessarily a tackle specific box.

It shows that it doesn’t need to be complicated — if design follows function and thought.

Best,

Fred


Fred, I think he did a great job on the design and not taking anything anything away from him.
He built what he needed for himself and looks like it worked for him.
At times overkill is just as bad when building things.
I believe the first air gun was introduced right around when you were born🙂, 1950.
I remember buying my first set from Sears, it was Craftsmen and lasted for about 25 years, today they last a couple of years.
I know I went through 4 sets with compressor to date
Their brad nailer was very nice to use, the tip was really tapered, allowing me to shoot the brad in the grove on colonial door and window trim. I have not found one the same yet.
Nice design, but very light duty.
I'm wondering how he was able to nail the 1/4" panel from the side, I would have a hard time, but I only been doing this for 44 years Undecided.

Still, a very nice simple and functional design.

Sal
44yrs,,,,, Wink you got 56yrs more to go,,,, Grin

Benni, a couple of years and that’s going to be it, my body is done, but let’s hope it is still good for fishing 😉
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Forget about all the reasons why something may not work. You only need to find one good reason why it will.
Benni3
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« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2018, 07:08:28 PM »

Nice design, but very light duty.
I'm wondering how he was able to nail the 1/4" panel from the side, I would have a hard time, but I only been doing this for 44 years Undecided.

Still, a very nice simple and functional design.

Sal

Right Sal, it is light duty, and not good for a tackle box, IMO.

I would have figured out first if this was a fresh, salt, boat box, surf box — then design accordingly using hardwood — or at least Marine Ply with no voids and a smooth surface — and although box or finger joints are very good, if using hardwood, I would use a blind dovetail.  If high quality plywood — it would need to be at least 1/2” — and the finger joints would be at 1/2” intervals.

As to the top and bottom panels — I believe he is probably using a 23 gauge pin nailer that is shooting 1” SS pins slightly below the surface.  These are a great invention for trim, and other jobs.  I have a Hitachi 23 gauge pin nailer that shoots up to 1” SS pins.  What a great tool!  I do not think they were around 44 years ago.   Wink Wink Wink

I would also install eight SS corners along with SS hardware.

This is just a simple example of a simple process to build any type of box — not necessarily a tackle specific box.

It shows that it doesn’t need to be complicated — if design follows function and thought.

Best,

Fred


Fred, I think he did a great job on the design and not taking anything anything away from him.
He built what he needed for himself and looks like it worked for him.
At times overkill is just as bad when building things.
I believe the first air gun was introduced right around when you were born🙂, 1950.
I remember buying my first set from Sears, it was Craftsmen and lasted for about 25 years, today they last a couple of years.
I know I went through 4 sets with compressor to date
Their brad nailer was very nice to use, the tip was really tapered, allowing me to shoot the brad in the grove on colonial door and window trim. I have not found one the same yet.
Nice design, but very light duty.
I'm wondering how he was able to nail the 1/4" panel from the side, I would have a hard time, but I only been doing this for 44 years Undecided.

Still, a very nice simple and functional design.

Sal
44yrs,,,,, Wink you got 56yrs more to go,,,, Grin

Benni, a couple of years and that’s going to be it, my body is done, but let’s hope it is still good for fishing 😉

haha,,,, this belt work I'm doing,,,,,it's a young man's job,,,I can't do it for to long and paint and body work,,,the chemicals will kill you,,,it's good to take a break,,,just fish as much as you can,,,my friend Cheesy
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Swami805
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« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2018, 10:46:57 PM »

You could mock up something with card board and try some different designs.
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Bill B (Tarfu)
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« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2018, 10:34:18 AM »

A box I saw years ago was approx 12" long, 10" deep and 12" tall.  The lid opened to reveal vertical panels running the length with notches to hold irons vertically.  The front open down to allow access to the area below th irons from lead and hook storage.  With a handle on top, a latch on the front for the lid and another for the front panel, and D rings on each side for a shoulder strap.  Haven't seen one since, but it was very functional for a deep sea rock cod trip.  Mark Mayo's designs come about as close as I have ever found.  Hope this helps with your design.....Bill
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juicebruiser
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« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2018, 05:06:49 PM »

Thanks everyone for the input. Mark Mayo's boxes are sure fine Quality.

I am thinking of a box that will store 4 3700 plano boxes which slid in from the front like Marks.
However I do not have the tools and expertise to do what he does with dove tailing and routering.

So Ill keep playing around with the cardboard as was suggested.

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oc1
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« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2018, 11:16:39 PM »

The trouble with wood boxes is the weight.  Steel tool boxes were lighter than the wood boxes they replaced.  The more refined your woodworking skills, the lighter a wood box can be while maintaining strength.  Not a big deal on boat and you are not having to lug it around much.  These days, Plano boxes in fabric bags seem to be the thing.
-steve
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