alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Mitchell 300 poor mans baitrunner
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
October 30, 2020, 05:29:09 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Mitchell 300 poor mans baitrunner  (Read 1365 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
jbas
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4


« on: February 26, 2020, 10:44:39 AM »

This past year I got into catfish and carp fishing.  Fishing from the bank with multiple fishing poles with my son and nephew was alot of fun.  I typically fish with older Mitchell reels, buying used reels online and getting them ready to fish is a lot of fun for me.

While the new reels have a baitrunner set up the old Mitchell spinning reels I use do not have this option. Being mechanical and having access to Solidworks at work I thought maybe I could make a poor man's version.

With the way the original spool and drag system works I thought that if I could use some sort of a cam mechanism that would flip up and go a free spool and then when a fish hits I could flip down to a “fighting” drag would be easy to do.

My first proto type was down and dirty. It was made from multiple pieces screwed together. Just to see it work for the first time was awesome. The first fish I caught with it was a 4 pound common carp. The set up was big and bulky but the idea was there.

Just after this was done my work got a 3d printer. This got me thinking about going to the next level with making the cam mechanism one piece, making a spool that had the capacity between the large and small spool and if I could make the drag system lower in the spool and do a multiple drag washer set up. 

I have been working on this on and off over the winter trying to get ready for spring. All of this is out of want not need. Just a fun project I am working on. I thought I would put it out there to see if anyone has done something like this or interested in doing this themselves. This is still a work in progress but if anyone is interested in seeing how it turns out let me know and I can update as I go.

Attached are a few photos. I have the proto type and a few of a 3d printed spool and the drag washer setup with a regular drag knob.  I do not have a good picture of the new 3d printed cam mechanism on the spool.


* IMG_20190909_210545070.jpg (971.66 KB, 3072x4096 - viewed 58 times.)

* IMG_20190909_210609340.jpg (1004.23 KB, 3072x4096 - viewed 65 times.)

* IMG_20191228_131041832.jpg (1060.35 KB, 4096x3072 - viewed 57 times.)

* IMG_20191228_131458483.jpg (1900.67 KB, 3072x4096 - viewed 54 times.)
Logged
Dominick
Administrator
Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 8439


San Mateo, California


« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2020, 10:53:31 AM »

Good work.  It sure would be nice if you could post a photo of the final cam.  It looks like you have come up with a winner.  Dominick
Logged

Leave the gun.  Take the cannolis.

 Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day drinking beer.
xjchad
Sensei
Member
***
Online Online

Posts: 1455



« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2020, 11:18:08 AM »

This is great!!
I've been playing with the same idea to use on my 9500SS, but haven't gotten to the point of drawing anything up yet.
You've done some great work here and I see a lot of potential for this idea!
Keep it up and keep us posted!
Logged

Husband, Father, Fisherman
________________
Chad Bussanich
CJ's Reel and Rig
Reel service, repair, and customizations
cjsreelandrig@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/CJsReelandRig/
Ron Jones
Firearms Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 4199


« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2020, 01:35:11 PM »

What are you printing the spool out of? Will it be able to handle the force of a big cat? This is awesome. So many options available with additive manufacturing.
The Man
Logged

Ronald Jones
To those who have gone to sea and returned and to those who have gone to sea and will never return
"
philaroman
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1454


« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2020, 02:10:59 PM »

I'm not up-to-date on the carp stuff, but I'm pretty sure that some of the more recent

Shimano's have a Baitrunner system completely inside the spool/drag knob, and

Okuma has an aftermarket Baitfeeder drag knob, to convert standard models

don't know where you could "peruse the innards" for ideas -- maybe, Carp forums
Logged
Crow
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 2042


Dauphin Island Sunset


« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2020, 02:19:15 PM »

Good job, and reel good thinking !!
Logged

There's nothing wrong with a few "F's" on your record....Food, Fun, Flowers, Fishing, Friends, and Fun....to name just a few !
nelz
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1179



« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2020, 02:52:49 PM »

I've seen some European versions of reels that have that. They're target market is the carp fishermen. I would sure like to get these for my spinners!
Logged
jurelometer
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 726


« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2020, 03:50:38 PM »

Nice!

I'm not up-to-date on the carp stuff, but I'm pretty sure that some of the more recent

Shimano's have a Baitrunner system completely inside the spool/drag knob, and

Okuma has an aftermarket Baitfeeder drag knob, to convert standard models

don't know where you could "peruse the innards" for ideas -- maybe, Carp forums

Here it is:

http://okumafishing.eu/big-pit/

Looks like the same rough  idea.  The Okuma design has less to catch on line, and more importantly -the wear areas (especially the shaft hole) can be larger/stronger. I don't think the shaft support in your first version will last very long.

The general disadvantage of this type of design would be that the baitrunner vs main drag settings are not independent.  If you get one right, you might not like the other.


Since you are making a spool and drag setup- may I suggest an alternate approach?  By using a combination of belleville washers  (conical sprigs) at the top of the drag stack, you can make a drag that goes from zero to whatever your useful maximum is in one turn or less.   Now a short twist of the drag knob will allow you to go from baitrunner to fighting drag settings.   You could get a bit fancier, and have some sort of adjustable marks or even stops for one or both settings.  Ideally this is just some sort of light stop that you can override with a bit extra force.  Swapping the orientation of the bellevilles will change how fast the drag tightens.    If you search this site for belleville washers you should find lots of information on this in lever drag conventional reel discussions.

Micro adjustable drags are a bit useless IMHO. Loosing the extra turns is not giving up much.  At the same drag setting, the tension on the fish varies greatly based on the amount of bow, current, etc, so micro-tuning the drag is mostly applying a false sense of security Smiley .

On a separate note, you also have the option of redesigning the drag.  I was thinking a dual drag with delrin or rulon discs locked into both ends of the the spool with metal discs locked to the shaft.  This could be very smooth, plenty strong, and unaffected by water.   For a 300 series, the max drag that the reel can handle is not so great, so you do not need to go overboard. 

Regarding printing:  Stay away from PLA plastic if you can avoid it.  What type of printer are you using-  FDM or resin?  There are a few tricks to getting stronger parts.

And keep posting your progress please!

-J
Logged
philaroman
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1454


« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2020, 04:32:25 PM »

IMO, the gradual micro-adjustability matters more for zero-stretch
and I just plain like it, in BOTH: rear downsized/feeder drag
and separate, uncluttered, unencumbered full front drag
the "all-up-front" baitrunner seems like a cool DIY project, and
the commercial versions seem nice as once-in-a-while options w/ minimal added weight
BUT, for any kind of AFFORDABLE longevity, durability, consistency, power, range... 
GIMME OLDSKOOL!!!
Logged
happyhooker
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1313



« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2020, 05:38:14 PM »

All interesting.

Frank
Logged
Tiddlerbasher
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 3029



« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2020, 04:58:31 AM »

I have used the Okuma bait feed drag knob - it works very well. There were 2 versions, the earlier 'mk 1' was prone to failure - the threaded part would strip too easily, cost me a decent 100lb plus catfish. The second (current version) is much better. The operating lever is flat, rather than round, and much easier to operate. They fit the 65 and 80 size spinners. A simple cost effective upgrade Wink
Logged
philaroman
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1454


« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2020, 08:57:06 AM »


glad to know there's a better 2nd version -- is the one in the link v1 or v2?
I'd love one, but for the next lower body size...  older Okuma has
some drastic fluctuations/variations in spool size & specs, per given "size number"
would love a 45/50/55 with same drag well as modern 65/80, to use w/ this knob
Logged
jbas
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4


« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2020, 01:36:51 PM »

This project has been a lot of fun for me to do.  How it will look when it is finished is still up in the air.

As it was touched on in the comments there are definitely limitations with this design.
There is not any adjustment from free spool to fighting drag.

Right now I am not too worried about that.  For the size of the fish at my local lake the design works well. 

So back to the updates:

The spool design has some slots in the top of the spool. I did this for a quick visual of how much line is on there. I was also worried about the line twisting up on the release button so I made some “line ramps” to try and get the line over the release button.

I also supported the drag cam on both sides with the nut and rounded it out so the bail can flip open and closed and any position that the spool is at.

The drag set up is a little bit in the air. Trying to find a spring that has the right strength and height is a little tough.  I ended up finding a wave spring from McMaster Carr that seems to work ok.  The issue is that it is not stainless steel and I worry about corrosion.

The spool is printed on a Markforged printer with their Onyx chopped carbon fiber filament. I am not sure how it will hold up but I plan to start putting it thru the paces this summer.

For my area a 10 pound fish is huge and they never find themselves on the end of my line so it should be fine.


* IMG_20200316_162017204.jpg (467.96 KB, 3072x4096 - viewed 59 times.)

* IMG_20200316_162013139.jpg (507.6 KB, 3072x4096 - viewed 64 times.)

* IMG_20200316_162024082.jpg (295.67 KB, 3072x4096 - viewed 72 times.)

* IMG_20200316_162038287.jpg (763.96 KB, 3072x4096 - viewed 68 times.)
Logged
jurelometer
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 726


« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2020, 11:21:27 PM »

Excellent!

 A good grease coating will protect your regular steel wave washer if it does not get rubbed off.

Good choice on the filament.   Carbon fiber filled nylon is what is used for injection molding plastic reel frames.  My guess is that you should do fine for light duty freshwater if  the nylon fused well when printing.  The spool  lip might be a bit rough on the line when casting. 

-J
Logged
Tiddlerbasher
Photo Group
Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 3029



« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2020, 02:38:20 AM »


glad to know there's a better 2nd version -- is the one in the link v1 or v2?
I'd love one, but for the next lower body size...  older Okuma has
some drastic fluctuations/variations in spool size & specs, per given "size number"
would love a 45/50/55 with same drag well as modern 65/80, to use w/ this knob

The one in the link is a Mk 2.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.213 seconds with 19 queries.