alan tani @ alantani.com fishing reel repair rebuild tutorial Recent Posts
Reel Repair by Alan Tani
November 21, 2019, 01:04:28 PM *
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 1 
 on: Today at 12:57:56 PM 
Started by Crow - Last post by Fishy247
That sounds like a really cool product. I'm looking forward to hearing how it works out! Is it expensive?

MIke

 2 
 on: Today at 12:51:31 PM 
Started by The Fishing Hobby - Last post by The Fishing Hobby
thanks, this can be a nice alternative for quick repairs on the go.

it seems that it might be a better choice than "Threadmaster one"
this "epoxy" offered the same (which it wasnt) qualities than a regular wraping epoxy but with in one bottle (no mixing) but most of the rod builders didnt liked it.
I asked about it few years ago when I was starting to repair my own rods and friends started to asked me to repair 3-4 rods with just one small guide broken and some of those rods were cheap $12-15 wallymart rods.
https://alantani.com/index.php?topic=19968.0


I have used 5-min and 20-min clear glue epoxy from the hardware store (J-B weld and loctite) before as wrapping epoxy for really quick repairs for guys that wanted their rod asap and didnt care about aesthetics and J-B weld clear glue worked really good too for that purpose, is flexible and 100% clear, cheap and the rod was in the water few hours later, so this gorilla clear glue will be considered as option as well.


I think trying it out would be a good idea. I have my doubts about using it on really heavy duty rods. Should be fine for most any freshwater fishing I'd ever be doing, but further testing is definitely needed!

 3 
 on: Today at 12:49:13 PM 
Started by The Fishing Hobby - Last post by The Fishing Hobby
Interesting.  From what I have read, silane adhesives are used in a wide variety of demanding commercial applications, so this is an interesting candidate.

It looks like the stuff has good shear strength,  flexibility, and UV resistance, so it does check a lot of boxes..

I find it useful to think of  thread wraps and resin (not adhesive) as being analogous to  fiberglass cloth and resin in boat repair.  Neither does the job on its own.  The resin has to wet and then get past  the fibers to adhere to the existing surface,  creating a new plastic matrix bonded to the original part.  Epoxy formulas designed for this purpose build out a proper matrix, and also adhere well to the different cured resins used in blanks.   Any general purpose adhesive  has a lower chance of hitting the bullseye for this specific situation.

A couple things to consider:

 Silane adhesives are water resistant enough to be recommended for outdoor use, but they are not waterproof.  Waterproof adhesives are necessary for marine applications, and I personally would shy away from using materials on a fishing rod that are inadequate for marine usage.

Silane adhesives are moisture cure.  In addition to wetting out (with water) parts you are gluing, thin coats are recommended to ensure that the adhesive farthest from the surface fully cures, as moisture will not readily penetrate after the skin forms on the surface.

If this particular product is used for commercial purposes, the manufacturer will have a data sheet that specifies the bonding strength for various materials,  how much strength is lost from water exposure at various time intervals, etc.  It is probably worth checking out.

A good use for this stuff might be semi-temporary replacement of a guide.  No epoxy mixing, or lots of turning.  Just apply a thin coat, wait overnight, and then fish the rod until the end of the season.   Being able to easily find it locally when traveling is a big bonus.

My apologies if some of this was covered in the video.  I did not watch all 20+ minutes and jumped past several  parts.

-J
I appreciate the thoughts! I usually use color preserver so the epoxy doesn't penetrate into the thread anyway. That isn't a concern for me personally but something others may want to keep in mind. I mentioned in the video that I only build rods for freshwater fishing and that isn't a very demanding situation. With this particular glue, wetting isn't needed for porous surfaces and I think there is enough ambient moisture in the air where I live that I get a good bond to the gloss rod blank. It doesn't come off unless I make it come off. After removing some of these wraps after 24 hours, the glue is indeed fully cured all the way down the bottom. I think this is because of the thin coat. Most people don't know this (and you may), but a lot of people use epoxy when building rods that isn't waterproof either. Some are and some aren't. Same with this glue. It isn't meant for continuous contact with water (like continuously submerged situations) but it is fine for getting wet. Water beads up on it just like it does on any epoxy.
One thing I'm not sure about is if it will hold up with really heavy duty rods used for saltwater and really big fish. I have my doubts about that.
I think the best thing to do is just try it and see if it works. I'm planning on an ultralight fiberglass rod build using this glue as my personal test platform. I don't foresee any problems using it, but I will definitely find out for sure over time.

 4 
 on: Today at 12:26:57 PM 
Started by steelfish - Last post by steelfish
....... sounds like you're half way down the rabbit hole anyway. Sheridan

hey compa Sheridan, this was dec 2016.
if you get ever tired of your current job, you can work as Fortuneteller, amigo!
3 years later and now Im on a deepest place down the rabbit hole.

just recently got "Santa N-Nut" with a early xmas gift of the wrapping lathe with a dryer, so now I will have two dryers and one power wrapper and one manual wrapper, still need 4 more hands and 6 more hours of the 24hrs of the day.

BTW, depending on the rod, the guide, etc I now use one coat of epoxy on one-guide repairs not 3 as before on light FW rods or ligth surf rods,
repairing guides are really a different case than my 1 post concern, for for boat rods depending on the guide to replace 2 coats are needed and few cases as trolling rods or HD bait rods 3 coats for a perfect epoxy job.

 5 
 on: Today at 12:07:05 PM 
Started by The Fishing Hobby - Last post by steelfish
thanks, this can be a nice alternative for quick repairs on the go.

it seems that it might be a better choice than "Threadmaster one"
this "epoxy" offered the same (which it wasnt) qualities than a regular wraping epoxy but with in one bottle (no mixing) but most of the rod builders didnt liked it.
I asked about it few years ago when I was starting to repair my own rods and friends started to asked me to repair 3-4 rods with just one small guide broken and some of those rods were cheap $12-15 wallymart rods.
https://alantani.com/index.php?topic=19968.0


I have used 5-min and 20-min clear glue epoxy from the hardware store (J-B weld and loctite) before as wrapping epoxy for really quick repairs for guys that wanted their rod asap and didnt care about aesthetics and J-B weld clear glue worked really good too for that purpose, is flexible and 100% clear, cheap and the rod was in the water few hours later, so this gorilla clear glue will be considered as option as well.


 6 
 on: Today at 12:03:34 PM 
Started by The Fishing Hobby - Last post by jurelometer
Interesting.  From what I have read, silane adhesives are used in a wide variety of demanding commercial applications, so this is an interesting candidate.

It looks like the stuff has good shear strength,  flexibility, and UV resistance, so it does check a lot of boxes..

I find it useful to think of  thread wraps and resin (not adhesive) as being analogous to  fiberglass cloth and resin in boat repair.  Neither does the job on its own.  The resin has to wet and then get past  the fibers to adhere to the existing surface,  creating a new plastic matrix bonded to the original part.  Epoxy formulas designed for this purpose build out a proper matrix, and also adhere well to the different cured resins used in blanks.   Any general purpose adhesive  has a lower chance of hitting the bullseye for this specific situation.

A couple things to consider:

 Silane adhesives are water resistant enough to be recommended for outdoor use, but they are not waterproof.  Waterproof adhesives are necessary for marine applications, and I personally would shy away from using materials on a fishing rod that are inadequate for marine usage.

Silane adhesives are moisture cure.  In addition to wetting out (with water) parts you are gluing, thin coats are recommended to ensure that the adhesive farthest from the surface fully cures, as moisture will not readily penetrate after the skin forms on the surface.

If this particular product is used for commercial purposes, the manufacturer will have a data sheet that specifies the bonding strength for various materials,  how much strength is lost from water exposure at various time intervals, etc.  It is probably worth checking out.

A good use for this stuff might be semi-temporary replacement of a guide.  No epoxy mixing, or lots of turning.  Just apply a thin coat, wait overnight, and then fish the rod until the end of the season.   Being able to easily find it locally when traveling is a big bonus.

My apologies if some of this was covered in the video.  I did not watch all 20+ minutes and jumped past several  parts.

-J

 7 
 on: Today at 11:18:53 AM 
Started by alantani - Last post by Lunker Larry
What dreams are made of. I gotta do that someday.

 8 
 on: Today at 10:57:21 AM 
Started by alantani - Last post by foakes
Beautiful catches, Alan!

Thanks for sharing!

Best, Fred

 9 
 on: Today at 10:51:15 AM 
Started by alantani - Last post by jon_elc
O.O   

 10 
 on: Today at 10:35:57 AM 
Started by johndtuttle - Last post by Hapster
Good Day, I was doing maintenance on my Penn Spinfisher VI 4500, & removed 4 shims & I'm not sure where to replace them. Two are copper colored & the others chrome. Need your assistance please.

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